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Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
rs reflection upon Mr. Benjamin, and I wish to give the case a fair consideration before making such a charge. Who is there in Richmond that believes General Beauregard has his headquarters at Brentsville? or that General G. W. Smith is at Leesburg? or that Gen. Johnston is at Manassas? Who is there in Richmond, either in or out of the Department, that cannot point out one hundred errors in every column of the Herald's report? Sometime ago, when the Armada was preparing to sail from Hampton Roads, I sent you the number of ships composing it, the number of regiments on board them, the number of guns in the light artillery, and also furnished other facts which have since been found correct.--This information was not from any official source, but was made up from items gleaned from the Herald and other papers which contained items from time to time regarding the movement, while they tried seriously to throw a veil of secrecy over it. Like a witness on the stand who volunteers a few
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Army of the Potomac.[our own correspondent.] Centreville, Dec. 15th. Rumors of an impending battle are thick enough, but are traceable to no authentic source, nor do they near any great amount of probability upon their face. From the immense sheaf of reports I can pick out a straw or two to show which way the wind blows. From below we hear that the enemy is about to advance towards the Occoquan, with the design of crossing at Colchester. Hampton's Legion has gone down to look after them there, and the other troops a few miles below are on the qui vive to catch a glimpse of "Uncle Dabe's" grand army. The forces in entrenched camps by the batteries on the Potomac have relaxed none of their vigilance, and, although chafing at the delay, have not become disheartened, and still cherish faint hopes of a battle before the winter closes. From above, rumor says a force seems to be gradually advancing towards Leesburg, and that the lines have been drawn very closely in that vicin
Brentsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
they came into the service with, while we know that there is scarcely one that has been unchanged. The reason for this is because the Virginia papers have been received with more regularity than those from the extreme South. To say there is a spy retained as a clerk in the War Department is a severs reflection upon Mr. Benjamin, and I wish to give the case a fair consideration before making such a charge. Who is there in Richmond that believes General Beauregard has his headquarters at Brentsville? or that General G. W. Smith is at Leesburg? or that Gen. Johnston is at Manassas? Who is there in Richmond, either in or out of the Department, that cannot point out one hundred errors in every column of the Herald's report? Sometime ago, when the Armada was preparing to sail from Hampton Roads, I sent you the number of ships composing it, the number of regiments on board them, the number of guns in the light artillery, and also furnished other facts which have since been found corre
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
oldiers without damage to its commercial and agricultural interest. In the Southern States, where the labor is performed almost entirely by a class of the population from which no soldiers are taken. It was thought that a ten per cent. ratio could be adopted. This caused some little rivalry among the States as to which should approach nearest the standard, and finally individuals began to argue the matter, each of course maintaining his own State was equal or superior to any. The South Carolina papers published lists of the troops sent from that State, Georgia followed, and so on throughout the Confederacy. No paper in the South took the trouble to condense these various reports, but the Herald did; and some time in July last came out with a full list of the rebel army up to that date, giving at the same time a partial list of the regular Confederate officers which I had obtained from the War Department in Montgomery, and published during the second session of Congress. Every
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
the Southern States, where the labor is performed almost entirely by a class of the population from which no soldiers are taken. It was thought that a ten per cent. ratio could be adopted. This caused some little rivalry among the States as to which should approach nearest the standard, and finally individuals began to argue the matter, each of course maintaining his own State was equal or superior to any. The South Carolina papers published lists of the troops sent from that State, Georgia followed, and so on throughout the Confederacy. No paper in the South took the trouble to condense these various reports, but the Herald did; and some time in July last came out with a full list of the rebel army up to that date, giving at the same time a partial list of the regular Confederate officers which I had obtained from the War Department in Montgomery, and published during the second session of Congress. Everybody raised the cry of a spy in the departments, but by comparing the
Colchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 7
Army of the Potomac.[our own correspondent.] Centreville, Dec. 15th. Rumors of an impending battle are thick enough, but are traceable to no authentic source, nor do they near any great amount of probability upon their face. From the immense sheaf of reports I can pick out a straw or two to show which way the wind blows. From below we hear that the enemy is about to advance towards the Occoquan, with the design of crossing at Colchester. Hampton's Legion has gone down to look after them there, and the other troops a few miles below are on the qui vive to catch a glimpse of "Uncle Dabe's" grand army. The forces in entrenched camps by the batteries on the Potomac have relaxed none of their vigilance, and, although chafing at the delay, have not become disheartened, and still cherish faint hopes of a battle before the winter closes. From above, rumor says a force seems to be gradually advancing towards Leesburg, and that the lines have been drawn very closely in that vicini
Thaliacus (search for this): article 7
r or two by some excited Winkle. Secretary Chase borrowed fifty million dollars upon the strength of our evacuation of Munson's Hill, and he got the promise of more upon the strength of the "Grand Review." That was his object, and not to prepare for an advance upon his "on to Richmond" programme.--Still the feeling at the North--in fact all over Yankeedom — is decidedly in favor of active operations this winter, and who knows what a day may bring forth. Horace says, (Book I, Carmen IX, Ad. Thaliacus,) quid sit futurum cars: quauere non fuge; and acting upon his advice, we cherish the small amount of hope still left, and await a battle expectant of it. The fortifications around Centreville are now completed, and present quite a formidable appearance. For field fortifications they are built very strong, some of the works being bastioned forts, constructed in a manner that shows skillful engineering on the part of somebody — Beauregard, I presume. Great care seems to have been t
y one that has been unchanged. The reason for this is because the Virginia papers have been received with more regularity than those from the extreme South. To say there is a spy retained as a clerk in the War Department is a severs reflection upon Mr. Benjamin, and I wish to give the case a fair consideration before making such a charge. Who is there in Richmond that believes General Beauregard has his headquarters at Brentsville? or that General G. W. Smith is at Leesburg? or that Gen. Johnston is at Manassas? Who is there in Richmond, either in or out of the Department, that cannot point out one hundred errors in every column of the Herald's report? Sometime ago, when the Armada was preparing to sail from Hampton Roads, I sent you the number of ships composing it, the number of regiments on board them, the number of guns in the light artillery, and also furnished other facts which have since been found correct.--This information was not from any official source, but was made
asked batteries," was only designed to quiet public opinion, and was not, as published to the world, the inactive of an advance upon the army of Rebels who awaited them. And what a "review" it was; and how suggestive of Falstaff mustering his recruits to see the doughty McDowell draw up his Bull Ruffners to salute the "big Indian" as he rode slowly along the lines. How it must have delighted the breach Princes. How the Rail-splitter must have chuckled!--Dr. Russell was there — and so was Jenkins. Ah! well, the "Grand Review" passed off and had its desired effect. The public mind was quieted for a time; more volunteers came on; stocks became easier, and all at the expense of a few broken legs and collar bones, and the accidental shooting of a soldier or two by some excited Winkle. Secretary Chase borrowed fifty million dollars upon the strength of our evacuation of Munson's Hill, and he got the promise of more upon the strength of the "Grand Review." That was his object, and
a great deal to accomplish before he gets his organization perfected and his men up to the standard of good soldiers. The "grand review," where one half of his cavalry tumbled off their horses and where his infantry trembled in their boots for fear of marching upon "Rebel masked batteries," was only designed to quiet public opinion, and was not, as published to the world, the inactive of an advance upon the army of Rebels who awaited them. And what a "review" it was; and how suggestive of Falstaff mustering his recruits to see the doughty McDowell draw up his Bull Ruffners to salute the "big Indian" as he rode slowly along the lines. How it must have delighted the breach Princes. How the Rail-splitter must have chuckled!--Dr. Russell was there — and so was Jenkins. Ah! well, the "Grand Review" passed off and had its desired effect. The public mind was quieted for a time; more volunteers came on; stocks became easier, and all at the expense of a few broken legs and collar bone
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