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November 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 3
nd severe suffering. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Camp Below Piketon, on the Sandy river, in Pike county, Ky., 54th Reg't Va. Vols., Dec. 9, 1861. The 54th Virginia regiment of volunteers, commanded by Col. Robt. C. Trigg, and the first Virginia regiment that responded to the call of Kentucky for help, arrived opposite the little village of Piketon on the 6th inst. --Our route was from Wytheville, Va. We left Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Va., on the 8th day of November, 1861, and was on the march for one whole month lacking but two days, passing over the most mountainous country in the world, crossing at short intervals the many water courses that flow down and drain this whole country. The march of this regiment has been one of the severest and most arduous of the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often in the mud. We bridged the Sandy river in two places. Our orders are to report
December 9th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 3
From Kentucky. arrival of volunteers at Piketon — Protracted March and severe suffering. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Camp Below Piketon, on the Sandy river, in Pike county, Ky., 54th Reg't Va. Vols., Dec. 9, 1861. The 54th Virginia regiment of volunteers, commanded by Col. Robt. C. Trigg, and the first Virginia regiment that responded to the call of Kentucky for help, arrived opposite the little village of Piketon on the 6th inst. --Our route was from Wytheville, Va. We left Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Va., on the 8th day of November, 1861, and was on the march for one whole month lacking but two days, passing over the most mountainous country in the world, crossing at short intervals the many water courses that flow down and drain this whole country. The march of this regiment has been one of the severest and most arduous of the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often
From Kentucky. arrival of volunteers at Piketon — Protracted March and severe suffering. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Camp Below Piketon, on the Sandy river, in Pike county, Ky., 54th Reg't Va. Vols., Dec. 9, 1861. The 54th Virginia regiment of volunteers, commanded by Col. Robt. C. Trigg, and the first Virginia regiment that responded to the call of Kentucky for help, arrived opposite the little village of Piketon on the 6th inst. --Our route was from Wytheville, Va. We left Christiansburg, Montgomery county, Va., on the 8th day of November, 1861, and was on the march for one whole month lacking but two days, passing over the most mountainous country in the world, crossing at short intervals the many water courses that flow down and drain this whole country. The march of this regiment has been one of the severest and most arduous of the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often
the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often in the mud. We bridged the Sandy river in two places. Our orders are to report at Prestonsburg, and we will leave here on tomorrow for that place. Two of our men died en route for this place, but, as yet, the regiment is in good health. Before starting from Christiansburg the officers of the regiment held a meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, they fired upon it without giving the women
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 3
meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, they fired upon it without giving the women and children any chance for escape. This seems to be characteristic of the brave and gallant General Nelson. The ladies of this place hailed our approach with shouting and cheers — a perfect hallow of shouts went up for Jeff, Davis and his brave boys by the citizens as we hove in sight. The enemy devastated the country, and stole all the valuable movable property they could get their hands upon. Respectfully, "Vato."
meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, they fired upon it without giving the women and children any chance for escape. This seems to be characteristic of the brave and gallant General Nelson. The ladies of this place hailed our approach with shouting and cheers — a perfect hallow of shouts went up for Jeff, Davis and his brave boys by the citizens as we hove in sight. The enemy devastated the country, and stole all the valuable movable property they could get their hands upon. Respectfully, "Vato."
McLellend (search for this): article 3
places. Our orders are to report at Prestonsburg, and we will leave here on tomorrow for that place. Two of our men died en route for this place, but, as yet, the regiment is in good health. Before starting from Christiansburg the officers of the regiment held a meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, they fired upon it without giving the women and children any chance for escape. This seems to be characteristic of the brave and gallant General Nelson. The ladies of this place hailed our approach with
Mary Nelson (search for this): article 3
meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, they fired upon it without giving the women and children any chance for escape. This seems to be characteristic of the brave and gallant General Nelson. The ladies of this place hailed our approach with shouting and cheers — a perfect hallow of shouts went up for Jeff, Davis and his brave boys by the citizens as we hove in sight. The enemy devastated the country, and stole all the valuable movable property they could get their hands upon. Respectfully, "Vato."
James C. Taylor (search for this): article 3
one of the severest and most arduous of the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often in the mud. We bridged the Sandy river in two places. Our orders are to report at Prestonsburg, and we will leave here on tomorrow for that place. Two of our men died en route for this place, but, as yet, the regiment is in good health. Before starting from Christiansburg the officers of the regiment held a meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats. To our surprise, when they reached the regiment at Cedar Bluff, in Tazewell county, they were found to be made of cotton goods and were at once returned to the Captain at Richmond. The enemy left here in great haste. When they entered the town, the
Prestonburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 3
61, and was on the march for one whole month lacking but two days, passing over the most mountainous country in the world, crossing at short intervals the many water courses that flow down and drain this whole country. The march of this regiment has been one of the severest and most arduous of the entire service. We have had to wade creeks, branches and rivers; camping upon the snow-clad ground, and often in the mud. We bridged the Sandy river in two places. Our orders are to report at Prestonsburg, and we will leave here on tomorrow for that place. Two of our men died en route for this place, but, as yet, the regiment is in good health. Before starting from Christiansburg the officers of the regiment held a meeting and sent Capt. James C. Taylor to Richmond, to ask of Gen. Cooper a suspension of marching orders, until the men were or could be supplied with overcoats; but the General refused to suspend the order and directed Capt. McLellend to send on five hundred overcoats.
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