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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Centralia, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 14
at Warrentown. [Second Dispatch.] Warrenton. Dec. 24, 1861--The damage to the North Missouri Railroad may be summed up as follows; Bridges at Sturgeon, Centralia, Mexico, Jeffstown, and Warrentown, burned; also one station and perhaps twenty cars, from fifty to sixty culverts, large and small; three or four water stationsearn that the persons who did the damage are yet encamped along the road, about five hundred being at High Hill, and other bodies at or near Martinsburg, Mexico, Centralia, Sturgeon, and Allan. At Centralia they went within half a mile of the Berge Sharp-Shooters and destroyed a bridge and water station. Two freight trains were cCentralia they went within half a mile of the Berge Sharp-Shooters and destroyed a bridge and water station. Two freight trains were captured within four miles of the camp of a detachment of the same force. At Renwick the work was directed by practical railroad men, and the right course was always taken to make the destruction complete. Where the track was taken up, the rails were removed, the ties gathered in piles and set on fire, and the rails thrown sco
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
nt of the citizens along the road, as no single party could have accomplished so much in one night. Three hundred of the villains are known to have been engaged in the destruction of the bridge track at Warrentown. [Second Dispatch.] Warrenton. Dec. 24, 1861--The damage to the North Missouri Railroad may be summed up as follows; Bridges at Sturgeon, Centralia, Mexico, Jeffstown, and Warrentown, burned; also one station and perhaps twenty cars, from fifty to sixty culverts, large and en. Pope arrived here last night, and were allowed to remain in the cars until this morning, when they were escorted by their capturers, under Col. Davis, to Dr. McDowell's medical college, where they will be taken care of for the present. Warrenton, Mo., Dec. 24. --By arrivals from Mexico we learn that the bridge over Sait river, which is the largest and most costly on the road, except that at Perrgue, which the rebels previously spared on Friday night, was entirely destroyed on Sunday ni
Otterville, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 14
. We hear of scarcely any pillage, or any other outrage beyond the destruction of the road and telegraph line. The damage to the road cannot fall short of $300,000, and at least one month will be required to repair it so that trains can pass. St. Louis, Dec. 23.--Dispatches received at headquarters say that the command sent to Lexington by General Pope burned two ferry boats and a foundry at that place, and took two captains, one lieutenant, four men, and several horses Otterville, Mo., Dec. 24. --The cavalry which General Pope sent to Lexington have returned. In addition to the two ferry boats and the rebel foundry which they burned and the rebel officers and privates captured, previously reported, they killed the notorious Arkansas Robinson, and drove every band of rebels from the county for miles on either side of the route. They report the county quiet of the rebels. Jefferson City, Dec. 24.--A gentleman who has been with the rebel army several weeks arri
North America (search for this): article 14
the Americans recognised the Canadians during their rebellion, Europe would have shouted out "infamy;" and yet France and England are preparing to do just that infamous thing. It will not surprise you to hear that the organs of this Government have discovered that the arrest of Messrs. Sildell and Mason took place in Spanish waters, and that hence Spain has a right to join England and France in recognizing the South. The Patris says we cannot remaining spectators of a struggle between North America and England. It is quite clear that it is not our duty to avenge the wrongs of England; but the recognition of the South by that power, which would imply a final separation from the United States, could not be regarded as an isolated act, and would impose upon France the necessity of assuming a decisive attitude on this question. The result would be that two great maritime powers of Europe might be drawn into a common action with the same identical political object. Since writing
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 14
, to pay every officer actually in service under Gen. Fremont, what is justly due him. Miscellaneous. Mr. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gun-boat Young Rover, which is stationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. There are over 200 English vessels in the Northern ports. They are making rapid preparations to hasten home. A rumor prevailed North that Mason and Slidell were to leave in the Europa, from Boston, on Wednesday. Gen. T. W. Sherman has returned to his command in Missouri, having been pronounces not insane. John M. Brewer, one of the Fort Warren prisoners from Baltimore, has taken the oath and been discharged.
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): article 14
dge on the part of our government, that such a capture was to take place, and a disavowal of all purpose to insult the British flag. This has delayed the presentation of the peremptory-demand of the British government, which came out on the Europe.--Further advices from London will therefore probably be a waited. A special dispatch to the Post from Washington gives a rumor that the Cabinet have resolved to release Mason and Sildell, and that orders have gone on to ship them at once to Halifax. The Post, however, regards this rumor as improbable. The Washington correspondent of the New York Herald, of the 25th inst., argues that, although nothing officially has transpired in regard to the deliberations of the Cabinet on the subject, yet there is no doubt but that the difficulty will be settled without a war between England and the United States. It concludes thus: "The affair is complicated. Time alone can unravel it, and the utmost prudence on the part of the Adminis
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
ve miles of iron destroyed, and ten miles of wire rendered useless. Two trains, one having eight car loads of hog and several car loads of hemp, and two cars of merchandise, are in the possession of the rebels. Four engines are lying where they can beseized by them. Some of the men who belonged to the trains have arrived here, from whom I learn that the persons who did the damage are yet encamped along the road, about five hundred being at High Hill, and other bodies at or near Martinsburg, Mexico, Centralia, Sturgeon, and Allan. At Centralia they went within half a mile of the Berge Sharp-Shooters and destroyed a bridge and water station. Two freight trains were captured within four miles of the camp of a detachment of the same force. At Renwick the work was directed by practical railroad men, and the right course was always taken to make the destruction complete. Where the track was taken up, the rails were removed, the ties gathered in piles and set on fire, and
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
ls and privations. Your triumph has been three-fold — over your own inexperience, the obstacles of nature, and the rebel forces. When our gallant young Commander was called from us, after the disaster of Bull Run, this department was left with less than fifteen thousand men to guard three hundred miles of railroad and three hundred miles of frontier, exposed to "bushwhackers" and the forces of Gens Floyd, Wise, and Jackson. The Northwestern pass into it was fortified and held, Cheat Mountain secured, the rebel assaults there victoriously repelled, and the Kanawha Valley occupied. A march of one hundred and twelve miles over bad roads brought you upon Floyd's entrenched position, whence the rebels were dislodged, and chased to Sewell. Finally your patience and watchingi put the traitor Floyd within your reach, and, though by a precipitate retreat he escaped your grasp, you have the substantial fruits of victory.--Western Virginia belongs to herself, and the invader is e
Clear Spring, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 14
only lessons of magnanimity and forbearance towards the unarmed and defenceless, but to thrust their calumnies and their boastings down their own traitorous throats. Let not a moment be lost in your preparations for the task before you. W. S. Rosecrans, Brigadier-General U.S. Army, Commanding Department Western Va. Interesting from the upper Potomac — Attempt to Bribe a Federal Picket, Etc. Williamsport, Dec. 21. --This morning a man named J.B Wharton, residing at Clear spring, approached one of the river pickets, and offered him $25 to carry a dispatch to the other side. The soldier made the act known to Col. Leonard, who had him arrested, but not until he had destroyed the dispatch. He is connected by marriage with ex-Senator Mason, now at Fort Warren. Col. Leonard holds him as a spy. This town has been under martial law for several months. Lieut. John G. Hovey, of company--Massachusetts 13th, is the Provost Marshal. Among his political prisoners are
Warrentown (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 14
Hudson, they burned the bridges, wood piles, water tanks, ties, tore up the rails for miles, bent them, and destroyed the telegraph line. This was continued to Warrentown, where the work of destruction ceased. How many were concerned in this villainous work is not yet known, but there is no doubt but that it was a preconcerted angle party could have accomplished so much in one night. Three hundred of the villains are known to have been engaged in the destruction of the bridge track at Warrentown. [Second Dispatch.] Warrenton. Dec. 24, 1861--The damage to the North Missouri Railroad may be summed up as follows; Bridges at Sturgeon, Centralia, Mexico, Jeffstown, and Warrentown, burned; also one station and perhaps twenty cars, from fifty to sixty culverts, large and small; three or four water stations, 10,000 ties, from 200 to 300 telegraph poles, and five miles of iron destroyed, and ten miles of wire rendered useless. Two trains, one having eight car loads of hog
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