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December 21st (search for this): article 14
as happily. The mass of the people of both countries wish him "God speed" in this labor of exalted humanity. Important from Missouri — bridge Burning by the Confederates--Success of the expedition sent to Lexington,&c. St. Charles, Mo. Dec. 21. --A preconcerted movement was made last night by the rebels along the North Missouri Railroad. The rebels who returned from Gen. Price's army destroyed about 100 miles of the load, or at least rendered it useless. Commencing eight moment be lost in your preparations for the task before you. W. S. Rosecrans, Brigadier-General U.S. Army, Commanding Department Western Va. Interesting from the upper Potomac — Attempt to Bribe a Federal Picket, Etc. Williamsport, Dec. 21. --This morning a man named J.B Wharton, residing at Clear spring, approached one of the river pickets, and offered him $25 to carry a dispatch to the other side. The soldier made the act known to Col. Leonard, who had him arrested, but no
December 23rd (search for this): article 14
ph line. The damage to the road cannot fall short of $300,000, and at least one month will be required to repair it so that trains can pass. St. Louis, Dec. 23.--Dispatches received at headquarters say that the command sent to Lexington by General Pope burned two ferry boats and a foundry at that place, and took two capthe track at that place will be to-morrow, if the men are not interrupted, and the repairs of the telegraph line keep pace with these of the road. St. Louis, Dec. 23. --General Halleck has issued an order, fixing the penalty of death on all parties engaged in destroying railroads and telegraphs, and requiring the towns and couad approved of all the bills presented to him. There was no further news from Somerset. Payment of officers appointed by General Farmont. Washington, Dec. 23. --Adjutant-General Thomas last week sanctioned the payment of all the officers appointed by Gen. Fremont, named in the list forwarded by Gen. Halleck. New
December 24th (search for this): article 14
s and a foundry at that place, and took two captains, one lieutenant, four men, and several horses Otterville, Mo., Dec. 24. --The cavalry which General Pope sent to Lexington have returned. In addition to the two ferry boats and the rebel founfrom the county for miles on either side of the route. They report the county quiet of the rebels. Jefferson City, Dec. 24.--A gentleman who has been with the rebel army several weeks arrived here to-day, and reports that on Thursday last Price upon them. They beat a hasty retreat, and when last heard from were at Hammansville, hurrying South. St. Louis, December 24.--About a thousand of the rebel prisoners taken by Gen. Pope arrived here last night, and were allowed to remain in theer Col. Davis, to Dr. McDowell's medical college, where they will be taken care of for the present. Warrenton, Mo., Dec. 24. --By arrivals from Mexico we learn that the bridge over Sait river, which is the largest and most costly on the road, ex
December 25th (search for this): article 14
Latest Northern News.the Mason-Slidell affair.important News from Missouri.address from General Rosencranz. &c., &c., &c., We have received Baltimore papers to the 24th, and New York dates of the 24th and 25th December. From their columns we extract the following items of interesting news: The Mason-Slidell affair — England bent on a war. From the Paris correspondence of the New York Herald, dated 6th of December, we make the following extracts: Now that the Northern States of America are in trouble, England and France seize eagerly upon the slightest pretext to attack them. The hot blood of indignation mounts to the cheeks of loyal Americans here and in London when reading the vile, unmanly threats of the principal organs of both Governments. It is useless for me to recapitulate the open menaces made. Your flies will afford you ample proof that I do not exaggerate when I say that abuse and threats are leaped upon you. The decision of the jurist consuls of the E
June, 12 AD (search for this): article 14
Latest Northern News.the Mason-Slidell affair.important News from Missouri.address from General Rosencranz. &c., &c., &c., We have received Baltimore papers to the 24th, and New York dates of the 24th and 25th December. From their columns we extract the following items of interesting news: The Mason-Slidell affair — England bent on a war. From the Paris correspondence of the New York Herald, dated 6th of December, we make the following extracts: Now that the Northern States of America are in trouble, England and France seize eagerly upon the slightest pretext to attack them. The hot blood of indignation mounts to the cheeks of loyal Americans here and in London when reading the vile, unmanly threats of the principal organs of both Governments. It is useless for me to recapitulate the open menaces made. Your flies will afford you ample proof that I do not exaggerate when I say that abuse and threats are leaped upon you. The decision of the jurist consuls of the E
December 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 14
illed, and a number wounded. Seven dead bodies were found yesterday morning; one was that of an officer, and was taken to Newport News. He wore buttons lettered " A. M. M.," perhaps the Alabama Minutes Men. It is reported that a whole company of negroes were engaged, and two of our men are known to have been shot by them. General Mansfield and Acting Brigadier General Weber, highly complimented the troops engaged, for their coolness and bravery. News from Kentucky. Cincinnati, Dec. 23, 1861. --The Commercial has a dispatch from Frankfort, Ky., saying that Hon. W. C. Anderson, formerly member of Congress, died to-day. Gov. Magofflu, contrary to expectations, had approved of all the bills presented to him. There was no further news from Somerset. Payment of officers appointed by General Farmont. Washington, Dec. 23. --Adjutant-General Thomas last week sanctioned the payment of all the officers appointed by Gen. Fremont, named in the list forwarded
December 24th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 14
the telegraph line. This was continued to Warrentown, where the work of destruction ceased. How many were concerned in this villainous work is not yet known, but there is no doubt but that it was a preconcerted and simultaneous movement of the citizens along the road, as no single party could have accomplished so much in one night. Three hundred of the villains are known to have been engaged in the destruction of the bridge track at Warrentown. [Second Dispatch.] Warrenton. Dec. 24, 1861--The damage to the North Missouri Railroad may be summed up as follows; Bridges at Sturgeon, Centralia, Mexico, Jeffstown, and Warrentown, burned; also one station and perhaps twenty cars, from fifty to sixty culverts, large and small; three or four water stations, 10,000 ties, from 200 to 300 telegraph poles, and five miles of iron destroyed, and ten miles of wire rendered useless. Two trains, one having eight car loads of hog and several car loads of hemp, and two cars of merchand
t there is no doubt but that the difficulty will be settled without a war between England and the United States. It concludes thus: "The affair is complicated. Time alone can unravel it, and the utmost prudence on the part of the Administration will be necessary to avoid a war which may involve us with more than one European Power, while we are engaged in a life and death struggle for the preservation of the Union itself." Gen. Scott's return. From the Washington Star, of the 23d inst, we clip the following in relation to the purpose which induces old "Fuss and Feathers" to return so soon to the United States: The fact that Gen. Scott has so soon returned to the United States (in the Arago) is understood by his immediate friends here to have been the result of his belief that he possesses information, concerning the state of the affair of the Trent on the other side of the water, of importance to our Government; and therefore hastens here with it. It will b
ress from General Rosencranz. &c., &c., &c., We have received Baltimore papers to the 24th, and New York dates of the 24th and 25th December. From their columns we extract the following items of interesting news: The Mason-Slidell affair — ms has been already charged to present the whole case to the British Government at London." The New York Post, of the 24th inst., says: A private letter from well advised sources at Washington represent that certain interviews took place bunder Gen. Fremont, what is justly due him. Miscellaneous. Mr. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gunationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. Ther<
e star of the Lincoln Cabinet seems brightening up, England will strike are too many successes are gained. The leading editorial of the New York Times, of the 25th inst., in reference to the Mason and Slidell imbroglio, says: "Everybody, high and low, rich and poor, was striving to out clamor everybody else in his fulmihave gone on to ship them at once to Halifax. The Post, however, regards this rumor as improbable. The Washington correspondent of the New York Herald, of the 25th inst., argues that, although nothing officially has transpired in regard to the deliberations of the Cabinet on the subject, yet there is no doubt but that the difish near Newport News. The following paragraph in reference to a skirmish near Newport News, we take from the "Situation" article of the New York Herald, of the 25th inst.: The skirmish at Newport News on the 22d was a brisk affair, considering that the 20th New York regiment, engaged on our side, had only two companies in
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