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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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John G. Hovey (search for this): article 14
Picket, Etc. Williamsport, Dec. 21. --This morning a man named J.B Wharton, residing at Clear spring, approached one of the river pickets, and offered him $25 to carry a dispatch to the other side. The soldier made the act known to Col. Leonard, who had him arrested, but not until he had destroyed the dispatch. He is connected by marriage with ex-Senator Mason, now at Fort Warren. Col. Leonard holds him as a spy. This town has been under martial law for several months. Lieut. John G. Hovey, of company--Massachusetts 13th, is the Provost Marshal. Among his political prisoners are R. D. Shepard, of Shepherdstown, son-in-law of A. R. Boteler; Abraham Shepard, a Captain in the Confederate Army, and a considerable number of civil officers of Morgan county, who undertook to execute the Rebel laws. Telegraphic communications are now received from Romney in 4 hours, including 20 miles of horse transportation. In a few days the wires will connect. The skirmish near N
further news from Somerset. Payment of officers appointed by General Farmont. Washington, Dec. 23. --Adjutant-General Thomas last week sanctioned the payment of all the officers appointed by Gen. Fremont, named in the list forwarded by Gen. Halleck. New names have been forwarded since, and instructions asked in regard to them. Orders were sent out to day by Mr. Thomas, to pay every officer actually in service under Gen. Fremont, what is justly due him. Miscellaneous. Mr. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gun-boat Young Rover, which is stationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. There are over 200 English vessels in the Nort
M. De la Guerioniere (search for this): article 14
n with the same identical political object. Since writing this the Patris has come out so strongly for the rebels as quite to astonish all classes here, except those who know what it costs. The London Times and Post affect to consider this as wonderfully suggestive, and speak of the Pairse as the most confidential organ of the Emperor Napoleon. On the part of these journals such an assertion is false; as they well know that their own Paris correspondents have informed them that M. de la Guerioniere, the head of the paris, is no longer in favor with his Majesty, who sees him no more. I assert that both the Times and Post are well aware of this, and that when they pretend to attack undue significance to the Patrie, they are as false as it is The Patrie has now no political importance. Since the fall of its chief editor, 14 gets no more inspiration. Unfortunately, the Pays and Constitutionnel do. It was these worthy sheets that made the discovery about the Spanish waters
. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gun-boat Young Rover, which is stationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. There are over 200 English vessels in the Northern ports. They are making rapid preparations to hasten home. A rumor prevailed North that Mason and Slidell were to leave in the Europa, from Boston, on Wednesday. Gen. T. W. Sherman has returned to his command in Missouri, having been pronounces not insane. John M. Brewer, one of the Fort Warren prisoners from Baltimore, has taken the oath and been discharged. Col. Mulligan has declined an invitation to lecture in Boston. He says he is anxious to return to the war
Winfield Scott (search for this): article 14
a war which may involve us with more than one European Power, while we are engaged in a life and death struggle for the preservation of the Union itself." Gen. Scott's return. From the Washington Star, of the 23d inst, we clip the following in relation to the purpose which induces old "Fuss and Feathers" to return so soon to the United States: The fact that Gen. Scott has so soon returned to the United States (in the Arago) is understood by his immediate friends here to have been the result of his belief that he possesses information, concerning the state of the affair of the Trent on the other side of the water, of importance to our Governcollision with England on two former occasions --in that of the northeastern boundary difficulty, and that of Gen. Harney's imbroglio — was due in great part to Gen. Scott's personal efforts to settle the questions then in issue between the two Governments peaceably. He doubtless hopes — we trust justly — that in this case his pr<
T. W. Sherman (search for this): article 14
r. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gun-boat Young Rover, which is stationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. There are over 200 English vessels in the Northern ports. They are making rapid preparations to hasten home. A rumor prevailed North that Mason and Slidell were to leave in the Europa, from Boston, on Wednesday. Gen. T. W. Sherman has returned to his command in Missouri, having been pronounces not insane. John M. Brewer, one of the Fort Warren prisoners from Baltimore, has taken the oath and been discharged. Col. Mulligan has declined an invitation to lecture in Boston. He says he is anxious to return to the war
— bridge Burning by the Confederates--Success of the expedition sent to Lexington,&c. St. Charles, Mo. Dec. 21. --A preconcerted movement was made last night by the rebels along the North Missouri Railroad. The rebels who returned from Gen. Price's army destroyed about 100 miles of the load, or at least rendered it useless. Commencing eight miles south of Hudson, they burned the bridges, wood piles, water tanks, ties, tore up the rails for miles, bent them, and destroyed the teles from the county for miles on either side of the route. They report the county quiet of the rebels. Jefferson City, Dec. 24.--A gentleman who has been with the rebel army several weeks arrived here to-day, and reports that on Thursday last Price's camp at Osceola was thrown into confusion by the news that the Union troops were upon them. They beat a hasty retreat, and when last heard from were at Hammansville, hurrying South. St. Louis, December 24.--About a thousand of the rebel p
e who have been with you, as I have, can fully appreciate your trials and privations. Your triumph has been three-fold — over your own inexperience, the obstacles of nature, and the rebel forces. When our gallant young Commander was called from us, after the disaster of Bull Run, this department was left with less than fifteen thousand men to guard three hundred miles of railroad and three hundred miles of frontier, exposed to "bushwhackers" and the forces of Gens Floyd, Wise, and Jackson. The Northwestern pass into it was fortified and held, Cheat Mountain secured, the rebel assaults there victoriously repelled, and the Kanawha Valley occupied. A march of one hundred and twelve miles over bad roads brought you upon Floyd's entrenched position, whence the rebels were dislodged, and chased to Sewell. Finally your patience and watchingi put the traitor Floyd within your reach, and, though by a precipitate retreat he escaped your grasp, you have the substantial fruits of
way through them without losing a man. Six of the 20th however were slightly wounded.-- Ten of the enemy are known to have been killed, and a number wounded. Seven dead bodies were found yesterday morning; one was that of an officer, and was taken to Newport News. He wore buttons lettered " A. M. M.," perhaps the Alabama Minutes Men. It is reported that a whole company of negroes were engaged, and two of our men are known to have been shot by them. General Mansfield and Acting Brigadier General Weber, highly complimented the troops engaged, for their coolness and bravery. News from Kentucky. Cincinnati, Dec. 23, 1861. --The Commercial has a dispatch from Frankfort, Ky., saying that Hon. W. C. Anderson, formerly member of Congress, died to-day. Gov. Magofflu, contrary to expectations, had approved of all the bills presented to him. There was no further news from Somerset. Payment of officers appointed by General Farmont. Washington, Dec. 23.
e 24th, and New York dates of the 24th and 25th December. From their columns we extract the following items of interesting news: The Mason-Slidell affair — England bent on a war. From the Paris correspondence of the New York Herald, dated 6th of December, we make the following extracts: Now that the Northern States of America are in trouble, England and France seize eagerly upon the slightest pretext to attack them. The hot blood of indignation mounts to the cheeks of loyal Americans here and in London when reading the vile, unmanly threats of the principal organs of both Governments. It is useless for me to recapitulate the open menaces made. Your flies will afford you ample proof that I do not exaggerate when I say that abuse and threats are leaped upon you. The decision of the jurist consuls of the English Crown is a farce. The inconsistency of such a conclusion is too glaring not to let the world see that it is England's desire to go to war to save herself from
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