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China (China) (search for this): article 1
all the force in the field that it can possibly raise, having made the most determined and persistent efforts to furnish men and money for the cause. The people have been most severely taxed, and those at all suspected of Union sentiments, or proclivities, have been forced to contribute enormous sums. Many of the merchants and professional men have been impoverished by the exactions of the "Confederacy." The strongest and oldest Union man is Hon. John E. Ward, formerly our Minister to China, and he is dreadfully persecuted by the rebels, who have arrested him at least twenty times while attempting to escape, robbed him of his entire property and some $400,000, and threatened several times to hang him. Mr. Ward says they can kill him if they like, but that he will never surrender his allegiance to the Federal Government, or cease to detest and denounce the miserable abortion known as the Southern Confederacy. He is very anxious to go North, but is so closely watched that h
Kit Carson (Colorado, United States) (search for this): article 1
and after shaking hands they had a familiar chat, Other Ministers were then presented by Mr. Seward. The diplomatic corps was followed by the Justices of the Supreme Court, the officers of the army, headed by Gen. McDowell, and the officers of the navy, headed by Captain Wilkes. The army officers were generally in undress uniform, but these of the navy were in "full toggery," with cocked hats and epaulette. Among the prominent visitors was Major W. F. M. Arny, successor of Kit Carson, U. S. Indian Agent in New Mexico. He wore a full suit of buckskin, made in the Mexican style, elegantly embroidered with silk and beads. He private represented to Mrs. Lincoln a splendid blanket as a New Year's offering. It is an evidence of the taste and skill of the Rocky Mountain Indians. The blanket was made by a squaw of a Navajo chief, she having been employed upon it for five months. It is of large size, of wool, the figures upon it being white, red and blue. --Major Arny says the
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 1
ed every one, and all the citizens fled from the place. The city has no protection for defences whatever, all the guns, ammunition, and cannon having been sent to Virginia. There were no soldiers there but one regiment, which was encamped near the town temporarily, on its way to Virginia. During the residence of my informant in Savannah there were two or three drafts for soldiers, and he was compelled to furnish two substitutes for the rebel army, one of whom, an ex-lumber merchant of Maine, was the most violent Secessionist in the place. The South, he believes, has all the force in the field that it can possibly raise, having made the most determined and persistent efforts to furnish men and money for the cause. The people have been most severely taxed, and those at all suspected of Union sentiments, or proclivities, have been forced to contribute enormous sums. Many of the merchants and professional men have been impoverished by the exactions of the "Confederacy."
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
gs no news of interest from the lower Potomac. Vessels continue to run the blockade when the wind is fair. The navy-yard to-day presented a Sabbath like containt to its usual week-day scenes of activity, and its usual week-day sounds of hammering, clicking, steaming and brewing; all work being suspended. Mrs. Baxley, the Bebel spy. The Washington correspondent of the New York Herald December 31, says: Mrs, Baxley, the female spy, arrested on board the Baltimore and Old Point boat, with letters and memoranda of a treasonable character conceited about her person, has been brought here, and awaits her examination. She maintains a dogged silence upon points connected with her treason. Mrs. Baxley had not only in the folds of her dress, but in the rolis of her hair, contraband letters, which are in possess full of the proper authorities. Gen. Sumner's health — his removal to Washington. The Washington telegraphic correspondent of the New York Herald,
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
with if the attacks of vertigo with which he was troubled. New Year's day on the Virginia side — serenading. All the troops on the Virginia side, at eight o'clock this morning, were making extensive preparations for enjoying New Year's day. The programmes were read, theatrical representations and pig races being prominent in the bills. The occasional firing of guns were but incidents of the jubilation. An order has been issued prohibiting any bands in the service of the United States from going out on serenading parties, unless by previous permission of the Provost Marshal. There has, it appears, been an excess of such music at night, and in many cases proved more an annoyance than a compliment. Celebration of New Year's day in New York New York, Jan. 1. --The day was generally observed in the spirit for which New York is famous. All the stores, banks and public offices were closed, and every body seemed bent on enjoyment. The weather was beautiful th
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ah daily practiced with fire-arms to perfect themselves in their use. He thinks that even in Savannah the presence of the Federal army would be hailed with joy by a majority of the people. Savannah, like all the Southern towns through which Mr. Biddell passed, is entirely barren of business, and complaints are rife of the stagnation of trade, and the scarcity of money. --Mr. B. had the greatest difficulty in obtaining $500 in gold, although his brother-in- law had $90,000 of Georgia currency in the Planters' Bank, and when he did procure coin, was compelled to pay fifty cents premium for it. Mr. Biddell says that the most astounding fal ods are daily circulated and believed throughout the South, and that he himself had no doubt, at one time, that Lincoln had been hanged. Suck stories as the taking of Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York, very common, and the Savannah newspapers publish accounts of false victories won by the rebels, five or six times every week
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
nati Times, dated December 25th, we extract the following: Mr. Nelson R. A. Biddell, a merchant of Philadelphia, who married his wife in Savannah, Georgia, and who left there on the 2d instant, has just arrived here by way of Nashville, Bowling Greece, and Louisville. Mr Biddell had great difficulty in getting out of Savannah, having labored faithfully, but in vain to do so for several months. Mr. Biddell describes the alarm and panic at Savannah, after the Federal attack on Port Royal, as most extraordinary. Fear seized every one, and all the citizens fled from the place. The city has no protection for defences whatever, all the guns, ammunition, and cannon having been sent to Virginia. There were no soldiers there but one regiment, which was encamped near the town temporarily, on its way to Virginia. During the residence of my informant in Savannah there were two or three drafts for soldiers, and he was compelled to furnish two substitutes for the rebel army, o
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
--The day was generally observed in the spirit for which New York is famous. All the stores, banks and public offices were closed, and every body seemed bent on enjoyment. The weather was beautiful throughout. Lies of a Yankee Refugee — his Representation of the condition of the South, &c. From the Frankfort correspondent of the Cincinnati Times, dated December 25th, we extract the following: Mr. Nelson R. A. Biddell, a merchant of Philadelphia, who married his wife in Savannah, Georgia, and who left there on the 2d instant, has just arrived here by way of Nashville, Bowling Greece, and Louisville. Mr Biddell had great difficulty in getting out of Savannah, having labored faithfully, but in vain to do so for several months. Mr. Biddell describes the alarm and panic at Savannah, after the Federal attack on Port Royal, as most extraordinary. Fear seized every one, and all the citizens fled from the place. The city has no protection for defences whatever, all
ack brocade with woven bunches of flowers) received the through with her usual affability. A large number of volunteers were present among them General Blanker, with all the field officers of the General Division, in full uniform. After having been present at the Diplomatic presentation, the members of the Cabinet repaired to their houses, where they in turn received their friends. The Diplomats all called on Mr. Seward, whose daughter-in-law, Mrs Frederick Seward, did the honors. Mr. Cameren and the ladies of his family received calls from all the officers and many citizens. Mayor Wallack kept "open house" at his residence on Louisiana avenue, and his predecessor; Col. Berrett, was among the first who partook of his hospitalities. The police in their becoming new uniforms, paid the Mayor a visit, and were reviewed by him at 9 o'clock. The President was gratified to learn, at the commencement of his reception, by one of the medical attendants at "headquarters," that
M'Clellan (search for this): article 1
Late Northern news. the Observance of New Year's day at the North--Story of a Yankee Refugee — Facts and incidents, &c. We give below some extracts from late Northern papers received at this office: New Year's day in Washington — the President's reception — Entertainments by the Recreating--Gen. M'Clellan's health, &c. From the following special dispatches to the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated Washington, January 1, it will be seen that the Yankees had quite a gay time in the Federal metropolis on New Year's day: Never, within the memory of the oldest inhabitant, have we enjoyed such a warm, pleasant New Year's day at the national metropolis, and never has it been so decorously or generally observed. Our Southern friends were sad roystered, and in former years by noon there was a large number of intoxicated gentlemen of the F. F.'s V.'s to be seen.--This year, everything is orderly and quiet, although they have kept up an incessant firing of heavy guns a<
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