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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 19
the first time. On motion of Mr. Bradford, the Committee on finance were instructed to inquire into the expediency of reporting a bill authorizing the payment of interest due on the coupons of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, guaranteed by the State of Virginia. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor, presenting a communication from the Governor of Georgia and the joint resolutions adopted by the Legislature of that State, affirming that the separation from the United States is final, urging that the war of independence be urged with vigor, and pledging Georgia to stand by her sister Southern States until that independence is achieved. On motion of Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, the aforesaid resolutions were referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and the Governor's communication ordered to be printed. A communication was received from the President of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, extending the courtesies of his road to the members of
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 19
gates. The House of Delegates met, pursuant to adjournment, at 12 o'clock M., the Speaker in the Chair. Prayer by Rev. Dr. Jeter. The Senate bill to amend the act incorporating the Danville Manufacturing Company, was read the first time. On motion of Mr. Bradford, the Committee on finance were instructed to inquire into the expediency of reporting a bill authorizing the payment of interest due on the coupons of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, guaranteed by the State of Virginia. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor, presenting a communication from the Governor of Georgia and the joint resolutions adopted by the Legislature of that State, affirming that the separation from the United States is final, urging that the war of independence be urged with vigor, and pledging Georgia to stand by her sister Southern States until that independence is achieved. On motion of Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, the aforesaid resolutions were referred to the
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 19
g a bill authorizing the payment of interest due on the coupons of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, guaranteed by the State of Virginia. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor, presenting a communication from the Governor of Georgia and the joint resolutions adopted by the Legislature of that State, affirming that the separation from the United States is final, urging that the war of independence be urged with vigor, and pledging Georgia to stand by her sister Southern StatGeorgia to stand by her sister Southern States until that independence is achieved. On motion of Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, the aforesaid resolutions were referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and the Governor's communication ordered to be printed. A communication was received from the President of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, extending the courtesies of his road to the members of the House of Delegates. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor announcing the resignations of Jas. Boggs, of Pendlet
S. T. Pendleton (search for this): article 19
tates until that independence is achieved. On motion of Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, the aforesaid resolutions were referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and the Governor's communication ordered to be printed. A communication was received from the President of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, extending the courtesies of his road to the members of the House of Delegates. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor announcing the resignations of Jas. Boggs, of Pendleton, and John Gatewood, of Shenandoah, as members of the House of Delegates. On motion of Mr. Grattan, the communication was laid on the table. Mr. Tomlin. moved to reconsider the last vote. It appeared from the letter of Mr. Gatewood, just read his the Clerk, that he had been prevented from attending to his duties as a member of the House by the refusal of Gen. T. J. Jackson to permit him to leave his company, now in service. The Convention had granted the right to those members o
ght to those members of the General Assembly in the military service of the State, to absent themselves from their companies, in order to perform their duties as members, and he entered his protest against the act of General Jackson, as one interfering with the privileges of this House. Mr. Barbour concurred with the gentleman from King William. This was a flagrant breach of the privileges of the House. He moved that the House refuse to accept the resignation of Mr. Gatewood. Mr. Robertson also agreed with the gentleman preceding him, but he thought the subject was one of great importance, and deserved more than hasty action. He thought it ought to be referred to a committee. Mr. Rutherfoord moved to refer the subject of his resignation to the Committee on Privileges and elections. Mr. Tomlin was anxious to have immediate action taken. He thought the Sergeant at-Arms ought to be directed to go and bring the gentleman here, so that he might be permitted to exerc
James Boggs (search for this): article 19
ster Southern States until that independence is achieved. On motion of Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, the aforesaid resolutions were referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and the Governor's communication ordered to be printed. A communication was received from the President of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, extending the courtesies of his road to the members of the House of Delegates. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor announcing the resignations of Jas. Boggs, of Pendleton, and John Gatewood, of Shenandoah, as members of the House of Delegates. On motion of Mr. Grattan, the communication was laid on the table. Mr. Tomlin. moved to reconsider the last vote. It appeared from the letter of Mr. Gatewood, just read his the Clerk, that he had been prevented from attending to his duties as a member of the House by the refusal of Gen. T. J. Jackson to permit him to leave his company, now in service. The Convention had granted the right to t
T. J. Jackson (search for this): article 19
laid on the table. Mr. Tomlin. moved to reconsider the last vote. It appeared from the letter of Mr. Gatewood, just read his the Clerk, that he had been prevented from attending to his duties as a member of the House by the refusal of Gen. T. J. Jackson to permit him to leave his company, now in service. The Convention had granted the right to those members of the General Assembly in the military service of the State, to absent themselves from their companies, in order to perform their duties as members, and he entered his protest against the act of General Jackson, as one interfering with the privileges of this House. Mr. Barbour concurred with the gentleman from King William. This was a flagrant breach of the privileges of the House. He moved that the House refuse to accept the resignation of Mr. Gatewood. Mr. Robertson also agreed with the gentleman preceding him, but he thought the subject was one of great importance, and deserved more than hasty action. He tho
John Gatewood (search for this): article 19
ad to the members of the House of Delegates. The Clerk read a communication from the Governor announcing the resignations of Jas. Boggs, of Pendleton, and John Gatewood, of Shenandoah, as members of the House of Delegates. On motion of Mr. Grattan, the communication was laid on the table. Mr. Tomlin. moved to reconsider the last vote. It appeared from the letter of Mr. Gatewood, just read his the Clerk, that he had been prevented from attending to his duties as a member of the House by the refusal of Gen. T. J. Jackson to permit him to leave his company, now in service. The Convention had granted the right to those members of the General As with the gentleman from King William. This was a flagrant breach of the privileges of the House. He moved that the House refuse to accept the resignation of Mr. Gatewood. Mr. Robertson also agreed with the gentleman preceding him, but he thought the subject was one of great importance, and deserved more than hasty action.
t he had been prevented from attending to his duties as a member of the House by the refusal of Gen. T. J. Jackson to permit him to leave his company, now in service. The Convention had granted the right to those members of the General Assembly in the military service of the State, to absent themselves from their companies, in order to perform their duties as members, and he entered his protest against the act of General Jackson, as one interfering with the privileges of this House. Mr. Barbour concurred with the gentleman from King William. This was a flagrant breach of the privileges of the House. He moved that the House refuse to accept the resignation of Mr. Gatewood. Mr. Robertson also agreed with the gentleman preceding him, but he thought the subject was one of great importance, and deserved more than hasty action. He thought it ought to be referred to a committee. Mr. Rutherfoord moved to refer the subject of his resignation to the Committee on Privileges an
curred with the gentleman from King William. This was a flagrant breach of the privileges of the House. He moved that the House refuse to accept the resignation of Mr. Gatewood. Mr. Robertson also agreed with the gentleman preceding him, but he thought the subject was one of great importance, and deserved more than hasty action. He thought it ought to be referred to a committee. Mr. Rutherfoord moved to refer the subject of his resignation to the Committee on Privileges and elections. Mr. Tomlin was anxious to have immediate action taken. He thought the Sergeant at-Arms ought to be directed to go and bring the gentleman here, so that he might be permitted to exercise his privilege as a member of the House of Delegates. Mr. Barnoue withdrew his motion, and the motion of Mr. Rutherfoord. was then adopted. Mr. Barnour presented a resolution encouraging the manufacture of saltpetre, which was adopted. On motion of Mr. Bradford, the House then adjourned.
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