hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 56 0 Browse Search
France (France) 24 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 20 0 Browse Search
Burnside 16 2 Browse Search
Thomas S. Price 16 0 Browse Search
James Shields 15 1 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
West Point (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 13, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 46 total hits in 12 results.

1 2
January, 1 AD (search for this): article 3
The Sinking cause of Jeff. Davis and his Southern Confederacy. [From the New York Herald, Jan. 1.] The independent Cotton Confederacy of Jeff. Davis has seen its best days. Under the increasing pressure of our fleets and armies, it is reduced to the condition of a city invested by an overwhelming force and cut off from its supplies. Growing up, as in a single night, into a luxuriant development, like Jonah's gourd, it is willing as rapidly away. From every quarter of the South, in every variety of manifestation, the facts and the evidence are daily accumulating upon our hands that nothing but the intervention of England or France can prevent this overstrained and exhausted rebellion from collapsing within Mr. Seward's limitation of ninety days, like the Great South Sea Bubble or any other audacious but shallow imposture. In the interesting statements which we published yesterday from two Union refugees who had run the gauntlet of the Davis despotism from Texas to Indiana
Judah P. Benjamin (search for this): article 3
the fate of Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Ship Island; and that, in short, "the prospect" of an independent Southern Utopia within any reasonable period of time is exceedingly gloomy. But the third article, that on "Government Speculation," from our doleful New Orleans contemporary, we are gratified to say, reveals the fact that all the swindling jobs of government officials, contractors, bucksters, sharpers, and rogues are not confined to the public service of the United States. Judah P. Benjamin, the head of the rebel Department of Justice at Richmond, has at least one subordinate who deals out "justice" by first extorting silver from the people, and then selling it at fourteen per cent. premium; and this, we are told, is in perfect keeping with the extraordinary conduct still pursued by the Post-Office Department." "Indeed," says our indignant New Orleans editor, still harping on the Richmond rebel junta, "it is no exaggeration to say that Buchananism is in full and magnifice
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 3
The Sinking cause of Jeff. Davis and his Southern Confederacy. [From the New York Herald, Jan. 1.] The independent Cotton Confederacy of Jeff. Davis has seen its best days. Under the increasing pressure of our fleets and armies, it is reduced to the condition of a city invesacts is from a long article of that paper on the late message of Jeff. Davis to his Confederate Congress at Richmond. The editor does not believe that the peculiar logic of Davis will convince England or France of the inefficiency of the Federal blockade, or bring either of those t he does not tell the whole truth, he tells enough to show that Jeff. Davis, with his Southern Confederate despotism, is fast becoming a pubpen revolt. Our New Orleans editor has the league at his back, and Davis and his tools are aware of it. New Orleans, it will also be bode manifest to them--first, that the Southern cotton nationality of Davis and his confederates is an exploded bubble; second, that the Govern
rmies, it is reduced to the condition of a city invested by an overwhelming force and cut off from its supplies. Growing up, as in a single night, into a luxuriant development, like Jonah's gourd, it is willing as rapidly away. From every quarter of the South, in every variety of manifestation, the facts and the evidence are daily accumulating upon our hands that nothing but the intervention of England or France can prevent this overstrained and exhausted rebellion from collapsing within Mr. Seward's limitation of ninety days, like the Great South Sea Bubble or any other audacious but shallow imposture. In the interesting statements which we published yesterday from two Union refugees who had run the gauntlet of the Davis despotism from Texas to Indiana, there are some very suggestive disclosures. Thus it appears our "blockade is depriving the people of the revolted States of many of the necessaries of life;" that "their currency is in the most wretched condition, and is daily
France (France) (search for this): article 3
of the South, in every variety of manifestation, the facts and the evidence are daily accumulating upon our hands that nothing but the intervention of England or France can prevent this overstrained and exhausted rebellion from collapsing within Mr. Seward's limitation of ninety days, like the Great South Sea Bubble or any other on the late message of Jeff. Davis to his Confederate Congress at Richmond. The editor does not believe that the peculiar logic of Davis will convince England or France of the inefficiency of the Federal blockade, or bring either of those Powers to his assistance, but argues that European nations are not to be gained to the rebeldes, from New Orleans around to Richmond, and thence through the interior to Nashville, utterly breaking up the Davis despotism, root and branch. Let England and France exercise their patience and philosophy a month longer, and two things will be made manifest to them--first, that the Southern cotton nationality of Davis and his
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 3
erate ports. In the next article of the New Orleans philosopher on "The Prospect" he thinks that praying and fasting are not equal to the duty of coping with Enfield guns and rifled cannon for that Providence always takes the side of the heaviest artillery; that our "formidable fleets" have created a terrible panic throughout the South; that Fernandina, Brunswick, Savannah, and other places on the Southern seacoast, are in great danger of sharing the fate of Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Ship Island; and that, in short, "the prospect" of an independent Southern Utopia within any reasonable period of time is exceedingly gloomy. But the third article, that on "Government Speculation," from our doleful New Orleans contemporary, we are gratified to say, reveals the fact that all the swindling jobs of government officials, contractors, bucksters, sharpers, and rogues are not confined to the public service of the United States. Judah P. Benjamin, the head of the rebel Department of Ju
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 3
s to his assistance, but argues that European nations are not to be gained to the rebel cause by merely refusing them any cotton except through Confederate ports. In the next article of the New Orleans philosopher on "The Prospect" he thinks that praying and fasting are not equal to the duty of coping with Enfield guns and rifled cannon for that Providence always takes the side of the heaviest artillery; that our "formidable fleets" have created a terrible panic throughout the South; that Fernandina, Brunswick, Savannah, and other places on the Southern seacoast, are in great danger of sharing the fate of Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Ship Island; and that, in short, "the prospect" of an independent Southern Utopia within any reasonable period of time is exceedingly gloomy. But the third article, that on "Government Speculation," from our doleful New Orleans contemporary, we are gratified to say, reveals the fact that all the swindling jobs of government officials, contractors, b
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
t through Confederate ports. In the next article of the New Orleans philosopher on "The Prospect" he thinks that praying and fasting are not equal to the duty of coping with Enfield guns and rifled cannon for that Providence always takes the side of the heaviest artillery; that our "formidable fleets" have created a terrible panic throughout the South; that Fernandina, Brunswick, Savannah, and other places on the Southern seacoast, are in great danger of sharing the fate of Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Ship Island; and that, in short, "the prospect" of an independent Southern Utopia within any reasonable period of time is exceedingly gloomy. But the third article, that on "Government Speculation," from our doleful New Orleans contemporary, we are gratified to say, reveals the fact that all the swindling jobs of government officials, contractors, bucksters, sharpers, and rogues are not confined to the public service of the United States. Judah P. Benjamin, the head of the rebel D
Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
cotton except through Confederate ports. In the next article of the New Orleans philosopher on "The Prospect" he thinks that praying and fasting are not equal to the duty of coping with Enfield guns and rifled cannon for that Providence always takes the side of the heaviest artillery; that our "formidable fleets" have created a terrible panic throughout the South; that Fernandina, Brunswick, Savannah, and other places on the Southern seacoast, are in great danger of sharing the fate of Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Ship Island; and that, in short, "the prospect" of an independent Southern Utopia within any reasonable period of time is exceedingly gloomy. But the third article, that on "Government Speculation," from our doleful New Orleans contemporary, we are gratified to say, reveals the fact that all the swindling jobs of government officials, contractors, bucksters, sharpers, and rogues are not confined to the public service of the United States. Judah P. Benjamin, the head
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
very variety of manifestation, the facts and the evidence are daily accumulating upon our hands that nothing but the intervention of England or France can prevent this overstrained and exhausted rebellion from collapsing within Mr. Seward's limitation of ninety days, like the Great South Sea Bubble or any other audacious but shallow imposture. In the interesting statements which we published yesterday from two Union refugees who had run the gauntlet of the Davis despotism from Texas to Indiana, there are some very suggestive disclosures. Thus it appears our "blockade is depriving the people of the revolted States of many of the necessaries of life;" that "their currency is in the most wretched condition, and is daily growing worse, while the sugar and cotton planters have already mortgaged their plantations in order to raise means of subsistence for their families and slaves, " that "gold and silver down the Mississippi have almost entirely disappeared, the former being at 35 pe
1 2