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n other directions, little else save continuous lines of mud, varying from two to six inches in depth. It is of that sticky nature peculiar to the mud of the Great west, and would be a most serious impediment to the march of infantry or the movement of transportation trains. Cavalry alone could get through it without breaking down on the first day's march, and even to that arm of the service it would be very fatiguing. We have positive information from General Price's army up to the 3d instant. It evacuated Springfield on New Year's day, and encamped on Wilson creek, near the old battle ground, also taking a position at Pond Spring, twelve miles west of Springfield, where Gen. Lyon's army waited for several days on its arrival from Roonville. A picket and foraging party held possession of Marshfield on the 5th, but a force of our troops had gone from Major Wright's command, and will probably succeed in driving them out. A party less than 200 strong were at Bolivar, on the roa
down on the first day's march, and even to that arm of the service it would be very fatiguing. We have positive information from General Price's army up to the 3d instant. It evacuated Springfield on New Year's day, and encamped on Wilson creek, near the old battle ground, also taking a position at Pond Spring, twelve miles west of Springfield, where Gen. Lyon's army waited for several days on its arrival from Roonville. A picket and foraging party held possession of Marshfield on the 5th, but a force of our troops had gone from Major Wright's command, and will probably succeed in driving them out. A party less than 200 strong were at Bolivar, on the road from Springfield to Warsaw, engaged in procuring flour and other supplies for the rebel army. The Secessionists of Springfield and vicinity have nearly all gone South, taking with them their negroes and all their moveable property. A portion of Fort-Smith is reported destroyed by fire about a month since. A few refuges
s follows: The following named twenty-four exchanged prisoners from Richmond--twenty taken at the battle of Bull Run, on the 21st of July, and four while on picket at Munson's Hill, on the 28th of August --were paid off at Washington on the 13th inst., and returned to the camp of their regiment in Virginia under direction of Lieutenant W. Banks. They halted at Colonel Ward's quarters, and gave him three times three hearty cheers, as their commanding officer at the Hull Run battle. An over is well prepared to receive an at tack; but fears are entertained that Fort Craig will be taken and the Texans advance on Santa Fe. Considerable excitement prevails in that place. A strange Juxtaposition. The Boston Traveller, of the 13th instant, says: Five officers of the British army reached this city on Friday last, in the steamer from Europe, on their way to Canada, preparatory to fighting the United States, should a war with England occur. They stopped at a hotel, and thei
iversary of the birth of Christ. When you write say if you got my letter dated 1st of January. Do not send me any money, as I have made arrangements with Colonel Corcoran for all I want. My health never was better. Be of good cheer; all will be right. Kiss little Mary for me. My love to mother, sister and the little boys. Your affectionate husband. J. W. Dempsey. Recovery of Gen. M'Clellan. The Washington telegraphic correspondent of the New York Herald, under date of the 14th inst., says: General McClellan has quite recovered from his recent illness, and is now able to devote himself to business. Those whose impatience had induced them to murmur at the to them apparently unreasonable delay of any great military movement, will soon have occasion to acknowledge their error.--General McClellan confides his plans to none, except as they are to be executed. His purpose is to effectually crush out the rebellion, and restore the public peace and the integrity of the
ompany B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, company G; Henry Hege, company G; Hugh F. Dunnigan, company H; Chas Redecker, company G; John Tyler, company D; Samuel Van Duger, company I; Wm. Fielding, company F; Wm. H. Brees, company l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg, company B, and Edw. L. Marsh, company E. Total, twenty-four. Another letter from Dempsey, the Yankee prisoner. From the New York Herald, of the 15th instant, we copy the following letter, from J. W. Dempsey, who, it will be remembered, wrote a letter from the Charleston prison some time since, in which he took occasion to utter many falsehoods with regard to the treatment of Federal prisoners in the South: Columbia, S. C., Jan. 4, 1862. My Dear Wife --Before this reaches you the papers, no doubt, will have informed you of our removal from Charleston to this city.-- We left Charleston New Year's morning, and arrived here late in t
January 1st (search for this): article 1
arm of the service it would be very fatiguing. We have positive information from General Price's army up to the 3d instant. It evacuated Springfield on New Year's day, and encamped on Wilson creek, near the old battle ground, also taking a position at Pond Spring, twelve miles west of Springfield, where Gen. Lyon's army wa My Dear Wife --Before this reaches you the papers, no doubt, will have informed you of our removal from Charleston to this city.-- We left Charleston New Year's morning, and arrived here late in the afternoon. There was a military escort in attendance, commanded by Capt. Schiver. At the depot, and along the line of march, and box, together with four letters from you, on Christmas Eve. From circumstances that I will here after explain, it was impossible for me to write until New Year's morning. Your likeness and little Mary's was my only company this anniversary of the birth of Christ. When you write say if you got my letter dated 1st of January
January 13th (search for this): article 1
ntention to procure a quantity of such seed as he believes will succeed in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois for distribution in small quantities. One hundred and twenty-five condemned Government horses were sold at auction to day, bringing from one dollar to ninety-eight dollars, or an average of twenty-eight dollars each. Is is said that some of these animals have contagious diseases. News from New Mexico--rebel troops marching to attack Fort Craig and Fort Union. Kansas City, Mo, Jan. 13. --The Santa Fe mail has arrived, with dates to December 29. Two thousand Texan troops are reported to be marching up the Rio Grand river for the purpose of attacking Fort Craig, and the same number marching up the Tocos river to attack Fort Union. The troops stationed at Fort Wise have been ordered to New Mexico. Fort Union is well prepared to receive an at tack; but fears are entertained that Fort Craig will be taken and the Texans advance on Santa Fe. Considerable excitement prevai
January 14th (search for this): article 1
eral report of the fight at Prestonsburg. Louisville, Jan. 14. --The following official documents have just been receive from Rolla — movements of Gen. Price, &c. Sedalia, Mo., Jan. 14 --Advices have reached here that the 1st Kansas regiregulations for Visiting the District Jail. Washington, Jan. 14. --On account of the inquisitorial proclivities of cConfederate batteries on the lower Potomac. Washington, Jan. 14. --A bout 8 o'clock last night, as the Reliance was tions of the Confederates at Cave city, Ky. Louisville, Jan. 14. --The rebels of Hammond's command, encamped up the and mules to be found. Indian affairs. Washington, Jan. 14. --The Committee on Indian Affairs will soon recomme seed in demand — sale of condemned horses. Washington, Jan. 14. --Numerous applications are made to the Commissione at home. Accident on the western Railroad. Troy, Jan. 14. --This forenoon, as the Troy and Boston train was a
July 21st (search for this): article 1
ot of arms about ten miles distant, and, sending out an expedition, seized nearly a hundred guns and a supply of flour and bacon. Several prisoners were taken at the same time. This is the third haul he has made within four weeks. The released prisoners from Richmond returned to camp. The special Washington correspondent of the New York Herald writes as follows: The following named twenty-four exchanged prisoners from Richmond--twenty taken at the battle of Bull Run, on the 21st of July, and four while on picket at Munson's Hill, on the 28th of August --were paid off at Washington on the 13th inst., and returned to the camp of their regiment in Virginia under direction of Lieutenant W. Banks. They halted at Colonel Ward's quarters, and gave him three times three hearty cheers, as their commanding officer at the Hull Run battle. An over whelming outburst of congratulation and applause from the entire regiment, a hearty welcome from the Colonel, and suitable refreshments
rs and men. I expected to find some of the members of my regiment here, but I was disappointed. Poor fellows, I have not heard from them since I left Richmond. Had any one of them been sent with me it would be much more pleasant for me, and nothing worse for them, as I could have relieved their sufferings in many ways. If my letters have not been received, I fear their friends and themselves will think I have forgotten them. I sent you the names of all the wounded from Richmond last August. If you receive it save it, as I have lost the copy. I have written to Colonel Tompkins and Captain Decorsey, but got no answer. You will be delighted to learn Colonel Corcoran and the officers confined with him are in good health. They were removed here with us. Lieutenants Connolly and Underhill, in fact all the officers and men, are in good health. My dear wife, I received my trunk and box, together with four letters from you, on Christmas Eve. From circumstances that I will here af
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