hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Tyler 45 1 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 42 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 40 0 Browse Search
John Hagan 32 0 Browse Search
Vera Cruz (Veracruz, Mexico) 32 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward A. Pollard 18 0 Browse Search
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
John S. Caskie 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 56 total hits in 19 results.

1 2
John Tyler departed this life at his lodgings, in this city, after a brief illness, at 12 o'clock last night. Mr. Tyler has served the people of Virginia with ability and distinction, in various public positions, for almost half a century. He has served in the General Assembly, on the Executive Council, in the House of Representatives of the United States, as Governor of the State, Senator in Congress, Vice President and President of the United States, member of the State Convention of 1829-'30, and the Convention of 1861, and, at the time of his death, was a member of the Provisional Congress, and a member elect of the Permanent Congress of the Confederate States. His services have been important and valuable; and, in all of these positions, he has fully met the public expectations. The lose of such a man, at a time when his talents and experience are so greatly needed in the public councils, is a calamity greatly to be deplored. Well may the people of Virginia and the South
fe at his lodgings, in this city, after a brief illness, at 12 o'clock last night. Mr. Tyler has served the people of Virginia with ability and distinction, in various public positions, for almost half a century. He has served in the General Assembly, on the Executive Council, in the House of Representatives of the United States, as Governor of the State, Senator in Congress, Vice President and President of the United States, member of the State Convention of 1829-'30, and the Convention of 1861, and, at the time of his death, was a member of the Provisional Congress, and a member elect of the Permanent Congress of the Confederate States. His services have been important and valuable; and, in all of these positions, he has fully met the public expectations. The lose of such a man, at a time when his talents and experience are so greatly needed in the public councils, is a calamity greatly to be deplored. Well may the people of Virginia and the Southern Confederacy mourn for the le
January 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 9
Legislature of Virginia Senate. Saturday,Jan. 18, 1862. The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock Mr. Collier, the Senator recently elected in the city of Petersburg, and county of Prince george, to fill a vacancy appeared and took his seat. Death of Ex-President Tyler. The President laid before the Senate the following communication from the Executive: Executive Department, January 18, 1862. Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Delegates: John Tyler departed this life at his lodgings, in this city, after a brief illness, at 12 o'clock last night. Mr. Tyler has served the people of Virginia with ability and distinction, in Collier, Isbell, New. man, Johnson, and Wiley. After the announcement of the committee as above, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Saturday, Jan. 18, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, Mr. Collier in the Chair. Prayer by Rev, Dr. Moore. The Speaker pre tem presented to the House a communication f
and appropriate language of justice and truth. The committee nominated on the part of the Senate to meet the committee on the part of the House, to carry out the object designated in the resolutions, consisted of Messrs. Beanoh, Robertson, Collier, Isbell, New. man, Johnson, and Wiley. After the announcement of the committee as above, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Saturday, Jan. 18, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, Mr. Collier in the Chair. Prayer by Rev, Dr. Moore. The Speaker pre tem presented to the House a communication from the Governor. [See Senate proceedings.] Mr. Barbour arose and after a few suitable remarks presented a series of joint resolutions in reference to Mr. Tyler's death, which were unanimously adopted. [The resolutions will be found in our Senate report.] Eulcgles were afterwards pronounced by Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, and other. The Speaker then appointed the commit. too, and the House adjourned,
stance of their feeling and eloquent remarks upon the character and services of the subject of the resolutions. It was evident that in the tributes that were thus paid, it was the aim of the several speakers to rest the merits of the distinguished statesman upon the single and appropriate language of justice and truth. The committee nominated on the part of the Senate to meet the committee on the part of the House, to carry out the object designated in the resolutions, consisted of Messrs. Beanoh, Robertson, Collier, Isbell, New. man, Johnson, and Wiley. After the announcement of the committee as above, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Saturday, Jan. 18, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, Mr. Collier in the Chair. Prayer by Rev, Dr. Moore. The Speaker pre tem presented to the House a communication from the Governor. [See Senate proceedings.] Mr. Barbour arose and after a few suitable remarks presented a series of joint resolutions in refer
gements for his funeral and burial. Resolved That with the consent of his family his remains be deposited in Hollywood Cemetery, in the city of Richmond, near the remains of James Monroe, and that the Governor of this State be authorized to cause a suitable monument to be erected to his memory. Resolved, That these resolutions be forthwith communicated by the Speaker of the House of Delegates to the Congress of the Confederate States, with a request that they concur therein. Mr. Branch, of Williamsburg, said that as he had the honor to represent a part of the district in which the deceased had lived during a long life of public service, he moved the unanimous adoption of the preamble and resolutions which had come from the House. Mr. Robertson, of the city of Richmond: I cannot permit the occasion to pass without saying a few words, to express my sense of the merits and virtues of a deceased friend. On my way to the Capitol this morning, I learned that John Tyler,
Legislature of Virginia Senate. Saturday,Jan. 18, 1862. The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock Mr. Collier, the Senator recently elected in the city of Petersburg, and county of Prince george, to fill a vacancy appeared and took his esenting. this district that I felt it incumbent on me to make these few remarks. Mr. Robertson was followed by Mr.Collier of Petersburg, Mr. Dickinson of Prince Edward, and Mr. Isbell of Jefferson. We regret that we have not space to add to on the part of the House, to carry out the object designated in the resolutions, consisted of Messrs. Beanoh, Robertson, Collier, Isbell, New. man, Johnson, and Wiley. After the announcement of the committee as above, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Saturday, Jan. 18, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, Mr. Collier in the Chair. Prayer by Rev, Dr. Moore. The Speaker pre tem presented to the House a communication from the Governor. [See Senate proceedings.]
Dickinson (search for this): article 9
be deplored. Well may the people of Virginia and the Southern Confederacy mourn for the less of one not less distinguished for his manly virtues than his brilliant career as a statesman. Respectfully, John Letcher. On motion of Mr. Dickinson, of Prince Edward, the communication was laid on the table, and ordered to be printed. A message was received from the House of Delegates, communicating resolutions commemorating the death of Hon. John. Tyler. The preamble and resolutioof these resolutions. It is in consequence of my representations. It is in consequence of my representing. this district that I felt it incumbent on me to make these few remarks. Mr. Robertson was followed by Mr.Collier of Petersburg, Mr. Dickinson of Prince Edward, and Mr. Isbell of Jefferson. We regret that we have not space to add to the above even the substance of their feeling and eloquent remarks upon the character and services of the subject of the resolutions. It was evident t
nsequence of my representations. It is in consequence of my representing. this district that I felt it incumbent on me to make these few remarks. Mr. Robertson was followed by Mr.Collier of Petersburg, Mr. Dickinson of Prince Edward, and Mr. Isbell of Jefferson. We regret that we have not space to add to the above even the substance of their feeling and eloquent remarks upon the character and services of the subject of the resolutions. It was evident that in the tributes that were thus ropriate language of justice and truth. The committee nominated on the part of the Senate to meet the committee on the part of the House, to carry out the object designated in the resolutions, consisted of Messrs. Beanoh, Robertson, Collier, Isbell, New. man, Johnson, and Wiley. After the announcement of the committee as above, the Senate adjourned. House of Delegates. Saturday, Jan. 18, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, Mr. Collier in the Chair. Prayer by Rev, Dr. Moo
Jefferson (search for this): article 9
wn to be repeated. His acts and his character are identified with the history of our State and country, and are known in Europe. I am confident that no dissenting voice will be heard upon the passage of these resolutions. It is in consequence of my representations. It is in consequence of my representing. this district that I felt it incumbent on me to make these few remarks. Mr. Robertson was followed by Mr.Collier of Petersburg, Mr. Dickinson of Prince Edward, and Mr. Isbell of Jefferson. We regret that we have not space to add to the above even the substance of their feeling and eloquent remarks upon the character and services of the subject of the resolutions. It was evident that in the tributes that were thus paid, it was the aim of the several speakers to rest the merits of the distinguished statesman upon the single and appropriate language of justice and truth. The committee nominated on the part of the Senate to meet the committee on the part of the House, to
1 2