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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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McClellan (search for this): article 1
, and under the depression gold mounted rapidly again to an exorbitant premium. Their spirit — about our fighting. They have made up their mind that the North must be as well convinced by this time as they are of the impossibility of reconstructing the Union, and must, therefore, be waging the war as one of subjugation, Against this, former Union men will fight as readily as original secessionists, and it is this conviction which has, of late, produced such unanimity. They regard McClellan as a great General, but say it is a pity he should be compelled to deal with troops he is afraid to trust. The fighting at Belmont, they say, was about the only good fighting done in the war, on our side, and they are amazed that we did not make it a complete success. Mr. C. was three days in Columbus, but was not permitted to see much of the fortifications. In passing in and out, however, enough was seen to show that they are of the most formidable nature. The rebels, themselves,
Cairo to this city by Geo. W. Gage, Esq., and other citizens, who were cognizant of their condition. Cox, in company with Gilbert, Morrell, and a fourth party, named Gardner, who has remained in Cairo, are all strong Union men, who, prior to the breaking out of the war, had been engaged in various capacities at the South. Upon the commencement of hostilities, they, in common with numerous other Northern men, were impressed into the rebel army. Gilbert, who had formerly been connected with Rice's equestrian establishment, was compelled to join a Louisiana regiment, Cox, who was a compositor in the office of that rampant organ of Secession, the Memphis Appeal, was offered his choice — to enlist in a Tennessee regiment, or be confined in the laboratory and engaged in manufacturing cartridges. He chose the former, as presenting the best opportunities for escape. Morrell was also impressed into a Tennessee regiment, and Gardner into a Louisiana regiment. The concentration of the Sout
ibly be placed in. To the men who took advantage of my absence to break up the old Sixty-ninth for the advancement of their own sordid interest, under the mask of patriotism, I shall have something to say on a more favorable occasion. Burnside's expedition. The following intelligence is culled from the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Jan. 22d: Rumors here seem to indicate that Gen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River tGen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River to take Wilmington, N. C. If this be true, it is quite probable that no demonstration will be made against Norfolk at present. An arrival from the expedition is now looked for with the greatest interest and anxiety. From Cairo, Ill., Jan. 19th, it is learned that the recent reconnaissance in force from Cairo was made in order to ascertain the strength and force of our position in Mississippi. The Yankee papers say it is soon to be followed up by a grand movement down the Mississippi river
army, arrived at the Tremont House on Monday night, having been forwarded from Cairo to this city by Geo. W. Gage, Esq., and other citizens, who were cognizant of their condition. Cox, in company with Gilbert, Morrell, and a fourth party, named Gardner, who has remained in Cairo, are all strong Union men, who, prior to the breaking out of the war, had been engaged in various capacities at the South. Upon the commencement of hostilities, they, in common with numerous other Northern men, were ioice — to enlist in a Tennessee regiment, or be confined in the laboratory and engaged in manufacturing cartridges. He chose the former, as presenting the best opportunities for escape. Morrell was also impressed into a Tennessee regiment, and Gardner into a Louisiana regiment. The concentration of the Southern forces at Columbus brought them together, and their sympathy of feeling and sentiment soon discovered them to each other. and they laid various plans of escape. The battle of en
ritation." No one formally proposed any course of action, but the designs of the conspirators were plain to the new Attorney General. He went home troubled. He had in tended, coming in at so late a day, to remain a quiet member of this discordant council. But it was not in his nature to sit quiet longer under such utterances. The next meeting was a long and stormy one, Mr. Holt, feebly seconded by the President, urging the immediate reinforcement of Sumter, while Thompson, Floyd, and Thomas contended that a quasi treaty had been made by the officers of the Government with the leaders of the rebellion to offer no resistance to their violations of law and seizures of Government property. Floyd, especially, blazed with indignation at what he termed the "violation of honor." At last Mr. Thompson formally moved that an imperative order be issued to Major Anderson to retire from Sumter to Fort Moultrie--abandoning Sumter to the enemy, and proceeding to a post where he must at once s
January 19th (search for this): article 1
Burnside's expedition. The following intelligence is culled from the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Jan. 22d: Rumors here seem to indicate that Gen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River to take Wilmington, N. C. If this be true, it is quite probable that no demonstration will be made against Norfolk at present. An arrival from the expedition is now looked for with the greatest interest and anxiety. From Cairo, Ill., Jan. 19th, it is learned that the recent reconnaissance in force from Cairo was made in order to ascertain the strength and force of our position in Mississippi. The Yankee papers say it is soon to be followed up by a grand movement down the Mississippi river, both by land and water, and in half a dozen directions. Another object of the well supported reconnaissance was to threaten Columbus in the rear, to prevent General Polk from sending reinforcements to Buckner or Bowling Green, or from affordi
January 22nd (search for this): article 1
ggle. He returns fully satisfied of the desperation of the South, and of the improbability that they will ever be finally subjugated. Arrival of deserters from the rebel army — interesting details of their escape.[from the Chicago Tribune, Jan. 22 Three young men, named Charles Cox, Jesse Gilbert, and W. J. Morrell, deserters from the Southern army, arrived at the Tremont House on Monday night, having been forwarded from Cairo to this city by Geo. W. Gage, Esq., and other citizens, whfor the advancement of their own sordid interest, under the mask of patriotism, I shall have something to say on a more favorable occasion. Burnside's expedition. The following intelligence is culled from the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Jan. 22d: Rumors here seem to indicate that Gen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River to take Wilmington, N. C. If this be true, it is quite probable that no demonstration will be made ag
Memphis business was comparatively prostrate, and large fires were of frequent occurrence. Stanton, the New Secretary of war, in Buchanan's Cabinet[from the St. Louis Republican, Jan. 20. A Buchanan's Cabinet, Mr. Attorney-General Black was transferred to the portfolio of State, and Mr. Stanton, then absent from Washington, was fixed upon as Attorney-General. The same night he arrived --abandoning Sumter to the enemy, and proceeding to a post where he must at once surrender. Stanton could sit still no longer, and rising, he said, with all the earnestness that could be expresseloyd and Thompson sprang to their feet with fierce, menacing gestures, seeming about to assault Stanton. Mr. Holt took a step forward to the side of the Attorney General. The imbecile President imphe room, and Floyd disappeared from Washington. Such was the end of Floyd and the beginning of Stanton. Col. Corcoran. Col. Corcoran, of the New York 69th, writes two letters from his prison
he floor of the guard-house and then forced their way through the dirt and rubbish, by means of the file, underneath four buildings, and emerged in sight of the picket guard, who were huddled together round a fire. They crawled along upon their hands and knees and managed to elude the observation of the picket. In this manner they proceeded until they reached the bushes, when they set off at a rapid pace, which was not slackened until they came within the lines of the Twentieth Illinois, Col. Marsh. They represent that Columbus is strongly fortified, and that the troops are still at work day and night in the entrenchments.--They are in hourly expectation of an attack, and sleep at night — when they do sleep — upon their arms. The forces at Columbus number some 40,000 men, composed of all nationalities, and mainly from Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The Tennessee troops are well uniformed in "niggen cloth," and armed with improved muskets. The other troops, h
the condition of the seceded States and course to be pursued with the garrison at Fort Sumter were discussed, Floyd and Thompson dwelling upon "the irritation of the Southern heart," and the folly of "continuing a useless garrison to increase the irs a long and stormy one, Mr. Holt, feebly seconded by the President, urging the immediate reinforcement of Sumter, while Thompson, Floyd, and Thomas contended that a quasi treaty had been made by the officers of the Government with the leaders of thef Government property. Floyd, especially, blazed with indignation at what he termed the "violation of honor." At last Mr. Thompson formally moved that an imperative order be issued to Major Anderson to retire from Sumter to Fort Moultrie--abandoningt, and the men who had so long ruled and billed the President, were surprised and enraged to be thus rebuked. Floyd and Thompson sprang to their feet with fierce, menacing gestures, seeming about to assault Stanton. Mr. Holt took a step forward to
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