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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
they set off at a rapid pace, which was not slackened until they came within the lines of the Twentieth Illinois, Col. Marsh. They represent that Columbus is strongly fortified, and that the troops are still at work day and night in the entrenchments.--They are in hourly expectation of an attack, and sleep at night — when they do sleep — upon their arms. The forces at Columbus number some 40,000 men, composed of all nationalities, and mainly from Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The Tennessee troops are well uniformed in "niggen cloth," and armed with improved muskets. The other troops, however, are wretchedly armed with shot-guns, and poorly uniformed, many of them barefooted, but all seem hopeful, contented, and confident of ultimate success. In the ranks are large numbers of Union men, who have been impressed into the service, and will seize the first opportunity to escape. Columbus is defended by eighty pieces of ordnance, commanding the river, the la
Port Royal Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ey reduced Hilton ad. The whole country side at once rushed down with miscellaneous weapons and no organization: and even after fifteen or twenty thousand had collected, they would only have swelled the slaughter on their own side, if an attack had been promptly made. But now everything has been lost, the fortifications have been strengthened, and the most efficient preparations have been made for a desperate defence. At New Orleans the people were much depressed over the loss of Port Royal island,-- Subsequently, however, they consoled themselves with the reflection that it was foolish for them to have ever thought of holding the islands against our powerful navy; but when we attempted to leave the cover of our men-of-war and attack them on the main land, they would be ready for us. Mason and Slidell. The news of the capture of Mason and Slidell at once brought gold down from thirty-five to fifteen per cent, premium. Confidence in their Government increased as the pro
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Orleans is represented as having been made almost impregnable. The shell road and every avenue of approach to the city are defended by very powerful batteries, sweeping them for miles, while on either side felled trees form an impenetrable abattis out into the swamp. And, to man the fortifications and aid in the defence, they have a force of no less than 50,000 men, under Major General Lovell. The Port Royal Affair. Mr. C. was in Savannah at the time of the naval bombardment at Port Royal. A single regiment, in his opinion, could have taken Savannah, or the fleet could have run past Fort Pulaski and taken the city with more case than they reduced Hilton ad. The whole country side at once rushed down with miscellaneous weapons and no organization: and even after fifteen or twenty thousand had collected, they would only have swelled the slaughter on their own side, if an attack had been promptly made. But now everything has been lost, the fortifications have been strengthen
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
, their bridge of ferry-boats was blown down the stream, and one, happening to pass over one of these sunken torpedoes, was literally blown to pieces. There were about 30,000 troops at Columbus, and some 10,000 or 12,000 had been sent to Bowling Green within the last two weeks. They were established in comfortable log huts, and appeared well, though rather miscellaneously clothed. They spoke of our gun-boats with great respect; said they had complete plans of the Benton, furnished by one t down the Mississippi river, both by land and water, and in half a dozen directions. Another object of the well supported reconnaissance was to threaten Columbus in the rear, to prevent General Polk from sending reinforcements to Buckner or Bowling Green, or from affording relief to the Confederates at camps Beauregard and Felicia. Northern Railroad facilities. The Yankee Congress is engaged in considering the subject of increased railroad facilities between New York and Washington.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
d until they reached the bushes, when they set off at a rapid pace, which was not slackened until they came within the lines of the Twentieth Illinois, Col. Marsh. They represent that Columbus is strongly fortified, and that the troops are still at work day and night in the entrenchments.--They are in hourly expectation of an attack, and sleep at night — when they do sleep — upon their arms. The forces at Columbus number some 40,000 men, composed of all nationalities, and mainly from Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The Tennessee troops are well uniformed in "niggen cloth," and armed with improved muskets. The other troops, however, are wretchedly armed with shot-guns, and poorly uniformed, many of them barefooted, but all seem hopeful, contented, and confident of ultimate success. In the ranks are large numbers of Union men, who have been impressed into the service, and will seize the first opportunity to escape. Columbus is defended by eighty pieces of
West Indies (search for this): article 1
eavily laden with Enfield rifles, army stores, and the more important necessaries. They have purchased large quantities of arms in Europe, and have got the greater portion of them safely in. Many articles are of course very scarce, such as the heavier classes of foreign imports, but he saw nothing of actual want more than is usual in large cities. The vessels which ran the blockade are mostly small, light-draught steamers, built solely with a view to speed, which clear from ports of the West Indies, with British papers, for some neutral port, sail under British colors, and, with the aid of the best pilots. run in under cover of the night. If they see the blockading vessels in the way at one port they stand off shore, run down to another and try again, and so on until they get in. The enormous profits of course pay for the delay and risk. The Sumter not a Privateer. Mr. C. states that the Sumter is not now sailing under letters of marque, as has been universally supposed,
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 1
to this thoroughfare. Good at Figuring. The New York Herald says: The following table exhibits the Union force now in the South western part of Kentucky, from where we are in daily expectation of receiving some glorious news: Infantry120,000 Cavalry12,000 Artillery, 19 batteries3,000 Total135,000 Reciprocity treaty with Canada. The House Committee on Commerce have before them the question of the reciprocation treaty between the United States and Canada. to this thoroughfare. Good at Figuring. The New York Herald says: The following table exhibits the Union force now in the South western part of Kentucky, from where we are in daily expectation of receiving some glorious news: Infantry120,000 Cavalry12,000 Artillery, 19 batteries3,000 Total135,000 Reciprocity treaty with Canada. The House Committee on Commerce have before them the question of the reciprocation treaty between the United States and Canada.
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
casion. Burnside's expedition. The following intelligence is culled from the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Jan. 22d: Rumors here seem to indicate that Gen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River to take Wilmington, N. C. If this be true, it is quite probable that no demonstration will be made against Norfolk at present. An arrival from the expedition is now looked for with the greatest interest and anxiety. From Cairo, Ill., Jan. 19th, it is learned that the recent reconnaissance in force from Cairo was made in order to ascertain the strength and force of our position in Mississippi. The Yankee papers say it is soon to be followed up by a grand movement down the Mississippi river, both by land and water, and in half a dozen directions. Another object of the well supported reconnaissance was to threaten Columbus in the rear, to prevent General Polk from sending reinforcements to Buckner or Bowling Green, or
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
President, urging the immediate reinforcement of Sumter, while Thompson, Floyd, and Thomas contended that a quasi treaty had been made by the officers of the Government with the leaders of the rebellion to offer no resistance to their violations of law and seizures of Government property. Floyd, especially, blazed with indignation at what he termed the "violation of honor." At last Mr. Thompson formally moved that an imperative order be issued to Major Anderson to retire from Sumter to Fort Moultrie--abandoning Sumter to the enemy, and proceeding to a post where he must at once surrender. Stanton could sit still no longer, and rising, he said, with all the earnestness that could be expressed in his bold and resolute features, "Mr. President, it is my duty as your legal adviser to say that you have no right to give up the property of the Government, or abandon the soldiers of the United States to its enemies; and the course proposed by the Secretary of the Interior, if followed,
Pamlico Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
most disagreeable position that men can possibly be placed in. To the men who took advantage of my absence to break up the old Sixty-ninth for the advancement of their own sordid interest, under the mask of patriotism, I shall have something to say on a more favorable occasion. Burnside's expedition. The following intelligence is culled from the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Jan. 22d: Rumors here seem to indicate that Gen. Burnside has abandoned the project of entering Pamlico Sound, and has gone up the Cape Fear River to take Wilmington, N. C. If this be true, it is quite probable that no demonstration will be made against Norfolk at present. An arrival from the expedition is now looked for with the greatest interest and anxiety. From Cairo, Ill., Jan. 19th, it is learned that the recent reconnaissance in force from Cairo was made in order to ascertain the strength and force of our position in Mississippi. The Yankee papers say it is soon to be followed up b
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