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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 2
ly employed a preacher for their edification. One great cause of the rebellion, which he omitted to speak of yesterday, was the division of the church--North and South. Mr. Harlan, (Rep.,) of Iowa, said, that on a former occasion, in debate on this subject, several Senators from the South stated essentially the same facts, but were rebuked by the Senator from Virginia (Mr. Mason) with the declaration that it was the policy of the South not to teach the slaves. Mr. Cowan, (Rep.,) of Pa., said that he had a very slight acquaintance with the opposed him in his political dogmas. He (Mr. Cowan) was as much in favor of putting down the rebellion as any one. He claimed that in examining this case the Senate must be governed by the salle rules as if they were as jurors. The charge against the Senator from Indiana is that of treason. There cannot be any half-way charge or half-way guilt. The Senator must be guilty of treason or nothing. If there was war between the North and t
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
ormed there could be no harm in sending such a letter. He (Mr. Cowan) thought that did not amount to much, as it was simply following the example of the circle in which he (Mr. Bright) moved. He (Mr. Cowan) was willing to admit that the writing of such a letter was a great folly; but he thought that Mr. Bright might have looked at the matter from another stand- point, and he (Mr. Cowan) was not willing to affix the stigma of treason from such doubtful testimony. Mr. Harris, (Rep.,) of N. Y., said: Up to the called session of July last but a single Senator has been expelled for three quarters of a century. In the early history of our Government a Senator had engaged in seducing several tribes of Indians from their allegiance to our Government, and had attempted to attach them to the British Government For that high misdemeanor, as it is called inconsistent with the performance of his duty, as the record states, he was expelled. Another Senator was supposed, some time after tha
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
son. Mr. Sumner, (Rep.,) of Mass., said that he did not understand there was such a war, but that Jeff. Davis and his confederates had levied war against the Government, and they were traitors. Mr. Cowan replied that if it could be proved that it was the intention of Mr. Bright to aid the traitors, there could be no doubt of his treason. The first fact to consider is, was there a state of war at the time the the letter was written? There were then three or four parties in the United States. One of them believed in secession. Another party did not believe in secession, yet thought if the States seceded we had no right to force them back. At the head of this party was Jas. Buchanan. Another party thought that as the Southern States had gone on in their secession movements until March, and had formed a Government, it was impolitic now to coerce them. Another party opposed secession, and was willing to take any means whatever to put it down. He (Mr. Cowan) understood that
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
we it to the country to expel him, and, above all, we owe it to the patriotic State of Indiana. Even now the telegraph flashes the news that her Tenth regiment has been nearly decimated. Her sons lie dead upon the ground, slain in defence of their country, and shall we retain here a Senator who would aid to furnish the rebellion with arms that are to kill and destroy her own citizens? Almost every day the Government seizes some persons in correspondence with the enemy and sends them to Fort Warren. I would deal more summarily with such men if I had the power. I would bring them up before martial law, and, if found guilty, I would hang or shoot them, and would say to all persons hereafter in like offences, such shall be your due. Some time last July a letter was found in the Post-Office of this city — a letter directed to the Richmond Enquirer--inquiring whether the Confederate Government wished to purchase any improved cannon. That letter was from my own State, and my own city —
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
there was war between the North and the South, and the Senator from Indiana aided the South, he would, of course, be guilty of treason. Mr. Sumner, (Rep.,) of Mass., said that he did not understand there was such a war, but that Jeff. Davis and his confederates had levied war against the Government, and they were traitors. on trial was unfit for parliamentary duty. It is well for this Senate that this doctrine had not been promulgated at an earliest day. If so, the Senator from Massachusetts (Mr. Sumner) would never have been permitted to hurl his polished, burning shafts against the barbarism of slavery, and the clarion voice of the veteran Senatoer's Ferry. Allow me to introduce my friend Coppic, who recommend and reliable in every truly. I Summer. How long would the Senator from Massachusetts have held his seat, and how soon would the Senator from Indiana have voted for his expulsion? If an open rebel ought to be expelled, ought not the person to b
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 2
ools where the slaves were taught to read. His own slaves, when born, were baptized according to the rights of the church to which he belonged, and female slaves were given in marriage just the same as white people. Mr. Rhett himself, who owned a large number of slaves, built a church, and specially employed a preacher for their edification. One great cause of the rebellion, which he omitted to speak of yesterday, was the division of the church--North and South. Mr. Harlan, (Rep.,) of Iowa, said, that on a former occasion, in debate on this subject, several Senators from the South stated essentially the same facts, but were rebuked by the Senator from Virginia (Mr. Mason) with the declaration that it was the policy of the South not to teach the slaves. Mr. Cowan, (Rep.,) of Pa., said that he had a very slight acquaintance with the opposed him in his political dogmas. He (Mr. Cowan) was as much in favor of putting down the rebellion as any one. He claimed that in examinin
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
jurors. The charge against the Senator from Indiana is that of treason. There cannot be any half the North and South, and if the Senator from Indiana thought the rebellion was not consummated, an had not the acquaintance of the Senator from Indiana beyond a mere speaking one, but that should nhomas D. Lincoln, written by the Senator from Indiana, one of which was addressed to his Excellencyes sufficient cause to expel the Senator from Indiana. The expulsion was absolutely demanded. We his seat, and how soon would the Senator from Indiana have voted for his expulsion? If an open rebe excited the indignation of the Senator from Indiana, if he had been a loyal man, and would have m care whether he did or not. The Senator from Indiana, when he gave him the letter, completed his ond, above all, we owe it to the patriotic State of Indiana. Even now the telegraph flashes the newsr no unkindness, sir, toward the Senator from Indiana, but I am grieved that one so long in the ser[11 more...]
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 2
eems to me, if the Senate were to expel this senator without coming to the conclusion that he was guilty of a treasonable design, it would be guilty of the greatest injustice toward the Senator and toward the Senate. Mr. Ten Eyck, (Rep.,) of N. J., had not the acquaintance of the Senator from Indiana beyond a mere speaking one, but that should not alter his course in this case. The simple fact was the finding of two letters on the person of Thomas D. Lincoln, written by the Senator from Imake, upon these facts, against the Senator from Indiana: that he aided, or intended to aid, those two rebels, Lincoln and Davis — knowingly aided them in the prosecution of their schemes of treason. And here I take issue with the Senator from New Jersey, (Mr. Ten Eyck,) who alleged that it does not appear that Lincoln ever visited Davis. I do not care whether he did or not. The Senator from Indiana, when he gave him the letter, completed his offence. That the rebellion existed and was in arm
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 2
t been promulgated at an earliest day. If so, the Senator from Massachusetts (Mr. Sumner) would never have been permitted to hurl his polished, burning shafts against the barbarism of slavery, and the clarion voice of the veteran Senator from New Hampshire (Mr. Hale) would long since have ceased to resound in this hall. And there are other Senators who have long been suspected of being too much imbued with a certain unhealthy doctrine to have held their seats by any certain tenure, if the Senae aggressors if war followed. He (Mr. Ten Eyck) upheld that great principle of common law which resolved all doubts for the benefit of those arraigned, and should vote against the expulsion of the Senator from Indiana. Mr. Clark, (Rep.,) of N. H., referred to the letter written to Jeff. Davis, and thought that letter and the circumstances sufficient cause to expel the Senator from Indiana. The expulsion was absolutely demanded. We could not properly satisfy the country or support the Ad
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
lark, (Rep.,) of N. H., referred to the letter written to Jeff. Davis, and thought that letter and the circumstances sufficient cause to expel the Senator from Indiana. The expulsion was absolutely demanded. We could not properly satisfy the country or support the Administration if we permitted such a Senator to remain in his seat. Suppose a letter had been found on the person of Copple, the confederate of John Brown, as follows:-- To John Brown, Leader of the Negro Insurrection, Harper's Ferry. Allow me to introduce my friend Coppic, who recommend and reliable in every truly. I Summer. How long would the Senator from Massachusetts have held his seat, and how soon would the Senator from Indiana have voted for his expulsion? If an open rebel ought to be expelled, ought not the person to be expelled who furnished aid to the open rebel to make the rebellion successful? He contended that the Senator could not plead ignorance that he went with the intention
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