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Barksdale (search for this): article 8
e in the rear of McLean's Ford. Longstreet's brigade held its former ground at Blackburn's Ford, from Jones's left to Bonham's right, at Mitchell's Ford, and was supported by Jackson's brigade, consisting of Colonels James L. Presson's 4th, Harper's 5th, Allen's 2d, the 27th, Lieut. Col. Echoll's, and the 33d, Cumming's Virginia regiments, 2,611 strong, which were posted behind the skirting of pines, to the rear of Blackburn's and Mitchell's Ford, and in rear of this support, was also Barksdale's 13th regiment Mississippi volunteers, which had lately arrived from Lynchburg. Along the edge of a pine thicket, in rear of and equidistant from McLean's and Blackburn's Fords, ready to support either position, I had also placed all of Bee's and Bartow's brigades that had arrived — namely, two companies of the 11th Mississippi, Lieut. Col. Liddell; the 2d Mississippi, Col. Falkner, and the Alabama, with the 7th and 8th Georgia regiments, (Colonels Gartrell and Lieut. Col. Gardner,)
equidistant from McLean's and Blackburn's Fords, ready to support either position, I had also placed all of Bee's and Bartow's brigades that had arrived — namely, two companies of the 11th Mississippi, Lieut. Col. Liddell; the 2d Mississippi, Col. Falkner, and the Alabama, with the 7th and 8th Georgia regiments, (Colonels Gartrell and Lieut. Col. Gardner,) in all 2,732 bayonets. Bonham's brigade, as before held Mitchell's Ford, its right near Longstreet's left, its left extending in the dialton's five guns, (two rifled,) two guns (one piece rifled) of Stanard's and two six-pounders of Rogers's batteries, the latter under Lieut. Heaton; and on the left by Gartrell's reduced ranks and Col. Smith's battalion, subsequently reinforced Falkner's Second Mississippi regiment, and by another regiment of the army of Shenandoah, just arrived upon the field, the Sixth (Fisher's) North Carolina. Confronting the enemy at this time, my forces numbered, at most, not more than 6,500 infantry an
D. B. Harris (search for this): article 8
in front of the line of battle. In this order he awaited the coming of the masses of the enemy, now drawing near. In the meantime, about 7 o'clock A. M., Jackson's brigade, with Imboden's, and five pieces of Walton's battery, had been sent to take up a position along Bull Run to guard the interval between Cocke's right and Bonham's left, with orders to support either in case of need — the character and topographical features of the ground having been shown to General Jackson by Captain D. B. Harris, of the Engineers, of this Army Corps. So much of Bee's and Bartow's brigades, now united, as had arrived — some 2,800 muskets — had also been sent forward to the support of the position of the Stone Bridge. The enemy beginning his detour from the turnpike, at a point nearly half-way between Stone Bridge and Centreville, had pursued a tortuous, narrow trace of a rarely used road, through a dense wood, the greater part of his way, until near the Sudley Road. A division under<
William Smith (search for this): article 8
said, as a support. Cocke's brigade, increased by seven companies of the 8th, Hunton's, three companies of the 49th, Smith's Virginia regiments, two companies of cavalry, and a battery under Rogers of four 6-pounders, occupied the line in fronth could not reach the distant enemy. As the Federalists had advanced with an-- That is, when the battle began — Smith's brigade and Fisher's North Carolina came up later, and made total of army of Shenandoah engaged of all arms 8,934, Hillines bordering the southeastern rim of the plateau, on which the battle was now to rage so long and so fiercely. Col. Wm. Smith's battalion of the 49th Virginia volunteers, having also come up by my orders, I placed it on the left of Gartrell's two six-pounders of Rogers's batteries, the latter under Lieut. Heaton; and on the left by Gartrell's reduced ranks and Col. Smith's battalion, subsequently reinforced Falkner's Second Mississippi regiment, and by another regiment of the army of Shen
orders having been duly dispatched by staff officers, at 11.30 A. M., General Johnston and myself set out for the immediate field of action, which we reached in rear of the Robinson and widow Henry's houses, at about 12 meridian, and just as the commands of Bee, Bartow, and Evans, had taken shelter in a wooded ravine behind the former, stoutly held at the time by Hampton with his legion, which had made a stand there after having previously been as far forward as the turnpike, where Lieutenant Colonel Johnson, an officer of brilliant promise, was killed, and other severe losses were sustained. Before our arrival upon the scene, General Jackson had moved forward with his brigade of five Virginia regiments from his position in reserve, and had judiciously taken post below the brim of the plateau, nearly east of the Henry House, and to the left of the ravine and woods occupied by the mingled remnants of Bee's, Bartow's, and Evans's command, with Imboden's battery, and two of Stanard's
er ground at Blackburn's Ford, from Jones's left to Bonham's right, at Mitchell's Ford, and was supported by Jd Lieut. Col. Gardner,) in all 2,732 bayonets. Bonham's brigade, as before held Mitchell's Ford, its righd rear of Bull Run, extending from the direction of Bonham's left, and guarding Island, Ball's and Lewis's Forah, guarded the level ground extending in rear from Bonham's left to Cocke's right. Two companies of Radfy of eight pieces was temporarily placed in rear of Bonham's extreme left. Major Walton's reserve batteryccessively by Generals D. R. Jones, Longstreet, and Bonham respectively, supported by their several appointed Run to guard the interval between Cocke's right and Bonham's left, with orders to support either in case of nesix guns, and Earley's brigade. Two regiments from Bonham's brigade, with Kemper's four six pounders, were alon, Generals Ewell, Jones, (D. R.,) Longstreet, and Bonham, were directed to make a demonstration to their sev
y at the time playing from his well-chosen position with brilliant effect with spherical case, the enemy having first opened on him from a rifle battery, probably Griffin's, with elongated cylindrical shells, which flew a few feet over the heads of our men, and exploded in the crest of the hill immediately in rear. As Bee adva formed of Colonels Hunter's and Heintzleman's divisions, Colonels Sherman's and Keye's brigades of Tyler's division, and of the formidable batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arnold regulars, and Second Rhode Island, and two Dahlgren howitzers — a force of over 20,000 infantry, seven companies of regular cavalry, and twenty-four p battery of six rifle guns — the pride of the Federalists, the object of their unstinted expenditure in outfit — and the equally powerful regular light battery of Griffin, were brought forward and placed in immediate action, after having, conjointly with the batteries already mentioned, plays from former positions with destructive <
s left, its left extending in the direction of Cocke's right. It was organized as at the end of th's brigade, as before said, as a support. Cocke's brigade, increased by seven companies of the- brigade, near the Stone Bridge, also under Gen. Cocke's command. The latter held the Stone Brground extending in rear from Bonham's left to Cocke's right. Two companies of Radford's Cavalediate front, I at once ordered him, as also Gen. Cocke, if attacked, to maintain their position to he Stone Bridge, but giving information to General Cocke of his change of position and the reasons n along Bull Run to guard the interval between Cocke's right and Bonham's left, with orders to suppton's) Virginia regiment, which, detached from Cocke's brigade by my orders and those of Gen. Johnseatly thinned. Withers's 18th regiment of Cocke's brigade had come up in time to follow this c's regiments. Preston's 28th regiment, of Cocke's brigade, had by that time entered the same b
centrating at this point. Made acquainted with my plan of operations and dispositions to meet the enemy, he gave them his entire approval, and generously directed their execution under my command. In consequence of the untoward detention, however, of some five thousand (5,000) of General Johnston's Army Corps, resulting from the inadequate and imperfect means of transportation for so many troops, at the disposition of the Manassas Gap Railroad, it became necessary, on the morning of the 21st, before daylight, to modify the plan accepted to suit the contingency of an immediate attack on our lines by the main force of the enemy, then plainly at hand. The enemy's forces, reported by their best informed journals to be 55,000 strong. I had learned from reliable sources, on the night of the 20th, were being concentrated in and around Centreville, and along the Warrenton turnpike road, to Bull Run, near which our respective pickets were in immediate proximity. This fact, with the
Corps, resulting from the inadequate and imperfect means of transportation for so many troops, at the disposition of the Manassas Gap Railroad, it became necessary, on the morning of the 21st, before daylight, to modify the plan accepted to suit the contingency of an immediate attack on our lines by the main force of the enemy, then plainly at hand. The enemy's forces, reported by their best informed journals to be 55,000 strong. I had learned from reliable sources, on the night of the 20th, were being concentrated in and around Centreville, and along the Warrenton turnpike road, to Bull Run, near which our respective pickets were in immediate proximity. This fact, with the conviction that, after his signal discomfiture on the 18th of July, before Blackburn's Ford — the centre of my lines — he would not renew the attack in that quarter, induced me at once to look for an attempt on my left flank, resting on the Stone Bridge, which was but weakly guarded by men, as well as but sl
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