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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
o give him battle. This force, if possible, ought to be collected from Tennessee and Kentucky. Their close correspondence shows distinctly enough the urgent necessity of so shaping the command in the Valley of the Kanawha as to insure, in the future, that unity of action upon which alone can rest any hope of success in military matters. I have not thought proper to take any other notice of these transactions, than to bring them to the notice of the President and Secretary of the Confederate States. The reasons which have induced me to take this course, I am sure, will not be misunderstood by either. I apprehend the course the enemy proposes to pursue is to carry out the plans indicated by General Rosecrans to Gen. Tyler, for the invasion of the interior of the State and the seizure of Lewisburg, set forth in an intercepted letter of the latter, a month ago. To prevent this I am in command of an actual force of four thousand two hundred men. This force will be required to o
Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
The Battles of 1861.Official reports. Official report of Brigadier-General Jno. B. Floyd, of the battle of the 10th September, 1861. Headquarters Army of Kanawha, Camp on the Road, Sept. 12, 1861. Hon. L. P. Walker, Secretary of War: Sir: Information had reached me for some number of days that a heavy force was advancing towards my position, from the direction of Clarksburg, in the North western part of the State. As these rumors became certainty, I made an effort to strengthen myself, first, by reinforcement, and secondly, by entrenchments, sufficient to with stand the very large force of the enemy. My orders to General Wise I send you copies of, and also copies of his replies. I failed in procuring reinforcements, but succeeded somewhat better in the construction of a temporary breastwork. At three o'clock in the evening of the 10th of September, the enemy, under the command of General Rosecrans, (as we learned through prisoners,) of whose advance I was f
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
engaged over another, it is but proper to say that the artillery behaved with the greatest bravery and efficiency; that under the command of Capt. Guy, who had reached me only two days before, and were for the first time under fire, behaved themselves in a manner worthy of all praise. I am very confident that I could have beaten the enemy and have marched directly to the Valley of Kanawha, if the reinforcements from Gen. Wise's column had come up when ordered, and the regiments from North Carolina and Georgia could have reached me before the close of the second days conflict. I cannot express the regret which I feel at the necessity over which I had no control, which required that I should recross the river. I am confident that if I could have commanded the services of five thousand men, instead of eighteen hundred, which I had, I could have opened the road directly into the Valley of the Kanawha. It would seem now as if the object so nearly accomplished can only be obtaine
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
ccess in military matters. I have not thought proper to take any other notice of these transactions, than to bring them to the notice of the President and Secretary of the Confederate States. The reasons which have induced me to take this course, I am sure, will not be misunderstood by either. I apprehend the course the enemy proposes to pursue is to carry out the plans indicated by General Rosecrans to Gen. Tyler, for the invasion of the interior of the State and the seizure of Lewisburg, set forth in an intercepted letter of the latter, a month ago. To prevent this I am in command of an actual force of four thousand two hundred men. This force will be required to oppose the advance of Gen. Cox and Gen. Rosecrans, with, as their forces, as they undoubtedly will, of at least 1,200 men. This disparity in numbers, is too great, although I will certainly give battle to the invading army at some strong point in the mountain passes as I may hope will equalize, to some extent, ou
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 12
ther, it is but proper to say that the artillery behaved with the greatest bravery and efficiency; that under the command of Capt. Guy, who had reached me only two days before, and were for the first time under fire, behaved themselves in a manner worthy of all praise. I am very confident that I could have beaten the enemy and have marched directly to the Valley of Kanawha, if the reinforcements from Gen. Wise's column had come up when ordered, and the regiments from North Carolina and Georgia could have reached me before the close of the second days conflict. I cannot express the regret which I feel at the necessity over which I had no control, which required that I should recross the river. I am confident that if I could have commanded the services of five thousand men, instead of eighteen hundred, which I had, I could have opened the road directly into the Valley of the Kanawha. It would seem now as if the object so nearly accomplished can only be obtained by an advance
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
rans, with, as their forces, as they undoubtedly will, of at least 1,200 men. This disparity in numbers, is too great, although I will certainly give battle to the invading army at some strong point in the mountain passes as I may hope will equalize, to some extent, our numbers. This may occur within the next three days; but should it be deferred for any length of time, I hope the Department will find itself to strengthen us with reinforcements. In the mean time, should Gen. Lee attack and repulse the enemy at Rich Mountain, I will hold myself in position to fall upon his flank or rear, as circumstances may allow or my force authorize. I have the honor to be, with high respect your obedient servant. [This is signed by Adjutant Peters, because an injury prevents my holding a pen.] Jno. B. Floyd, Brig.-Gen. Com'g Army of Kanawha. By William E. Peters, A. A. Gen., Floyd's Brigade. The above is an exact copy of the original. Edw'd S. Joynes, War Department, Dec. 10, 1861.
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
he second days conflict. I cannot express the regret which I feel at the necessity over which I had no control, which required that I should recross the river. I am confident that if I could have commanded the services of five thousand men, instead of eighteen hundred, which I had, I could have opened the road directly into the Valley of the Kanawha. It would seem now as if the object so nearly accomplished can only be obtained by an advance upon the enemy, by the left bank of the Kanawha river, with a sufficient force at any time to give him battle. This force, if possible, ought to be collected from Tennessee and Kentucky. Their close correspondence shows distinctly enough the urgent necessity of so shaping the command in the Valley of the Kanawha as to insure, in the future, that unity of action upon which alone can rest any hope of success in military matters. I have not thought proper to take any other notice of these transactions, than to bring them to the notice o
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
uired that I should recross the river. I am confident that if I could have commanded the services of five thousand men, instead of eighteen hundred, which I had, I could have opened the road directly into the Valley of the Kanawha. It would seem now as if the object so nearly accomplished can only be obtained by an advance upon the enemy, by the left bank of the Kanawha river, with a sufficient force at any time to give him battle. This force, if possible, ought to be collected from Tennessee and Kentucky. Their close correspondence shows distinctly enough the urgent necessity of so shaping the command in the Valley of the Kanawha as to insure, in the future, that unity of action upon which alone can rest any hope of success in military matters. I have not thought proper to take any other notice of these transactions, than to bring them to the notice of the President and Secretary of the Confederate States. The reasons which have induced me to take this course, I am sure
Wilcox Com (search for this): article 12
crans, with, as their forces, as they undoubtedly will, of at least 1,200 men. This disparity in numbers, is too great, although I will certainly give battle to the invading army at some strong point in the mountain passes as I may hope will equalize, to some extent, our numbers. This may occur within the next three days; but should it be deferred for any length of time, I hope the Department will find itself to strengthen us with reinforcements. In the mean time, should Gen. Lee attack and repulse the enemy at Rich Mountain, I will hold myself in position to fall upon his flank or rear, as circumstances may allow or my force authorize. I have the honor to be, with high respect your obedient servant. [This is signed by Adjutant Peters, because an injury prevents my holding a pen.] Jno. B. Floyd, Brig.-Gen. Com'g Army of Kanawha. By William E. Peters, A. A. Gen., Floyd's Brigade. The above is an exact copy of the original. Edw'd S. Joynes, War Department, Dec. 10, 1861.
R. Emmett Tyler (search for this): article 12
in the future, that unity of action upon which alone can rest any hope of success in military matters. I have not thought proper to take any other notice of these transactions, than to bring them to the notice of the President and Secretary of the Confederate States. The reasons which have induced me to take this course, I am sure, will not be misunderstood by either. I apprehend the course the enemy proposes to pursue is to carry out the plans indicated by General Rosecrans to Gen. Tyler, for the invasion of the interior of the State and the seizure of Lewisburg, set forth in an intercepted letter of the latter, a month ago. To prevent this I am in command of an actual force of four thousand two hundred men. This force will be required to oppose the advance of Gen. Cox and Gen. Rosecrans, with, as their forces, as they undoubtedly will, of at least 1,200 men. This disparity in numbers, is too great, although I will certainly give battle to the invading army at some strong
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