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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 6
ommand and his office were dissolved. The Confederate Government then tendered him a new commission coeval with the departure of Gregg's regiment, of the 14th of July. His first appointment was of the 20th April, and put him at the head of the brigadier-Generals-- the oldest in the service. The second, of the 14th July, put a dozen Brigadier-Generals above him — among them Gen, David Jones, who is closely connected by marriage with the President. Strangely it happens that Gen. Walker, of Georgia, was superseded by Col. Taylor, another near connection. Gen. Bonham consulted all the general officers in the Army of the Potomac, and they all agreed with him that such treatment of him was a wrong and an outrage. The following letter from Gen. Bonham on this subject has been published: Near Centreville, Nov. 12, 1861. Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War: Sir: I have not expressed myself happily if I have conveyed to your mind the idea that I maintain you can
Mayfield (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
ers filled with troops have been there for the last ten days or two weeks. This is regarded as a point where the enemy might attempt a landing, with the view of trying to reach the city by land. Attempting is not always doing. Negro stealing. A Tennessee correspondent says: A Confederate officer from Camp Beauregard, now in this city, informs us that Gen. Grant's division, in its retreat from Fort Henry to Paducah, stole 300 slaves on the route, and took them to Paducah! At Mayfield they uniformed and armed 150 negro men, and placed them in their ranks as Federal soldiers. Gen. Bonham's resignation. The Charleston Mercury, of February 1st, says: We learn from Richmond that Gen. Bonham has resigned his office as General of the Confederate States. The reason of his resignation we understand to be as follows: Gen. Bonham was Major General of the forces of South Carolina when he received an appointment of Brigadier General of the Confederate States, an
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
city by land. Attempting is not always doing. Negro stealing. A Tennessee correspondent says: A Confederate officer from Camp Beauregard, now in this city, informs us that Gen. Grant's division, in its retreat from Fort Henry to Paducah, stole 300 slaves on the route, and took them to Paducah! At Mayfield they uniformed and armed 150 negro men, and placed them in their ranks as Federal soldiers. Gen. Bonham's resignation. The Charleston Mercury, of February 1st, saysPaducah! At Mayfield they uniformed and armed 150 negro men, and placed them in their ranks as Federal soldiers. Gen. Bonham's resignation. The Charleston Mercury, of February 1st, says: We learn from Richmond that Gen. Bonham has resigned his office as General of the Confederate States. The reason of his resignation we understand to be as follows: Gen. Bonham was Major General of the forces of South Carolina when he received an appointment of Brigadier General of the Confederate States, and was ordered to Richmond. He was appointed a Brigadier General of no particular regiments formed into a brigade. Indeed, there were no regiments in the Confederate service at
Gainsboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
advance at any moment, I accept the commission now tendered. I desire, however, at the same time, respectfully to state that I shall ask leave to resign it as soon as so nothing decisive shall take place, or we shall go into winter quarters. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. L. Bonnam, Brig. Gen., 1st Brigade, 1st Corps. Army of the Potomac. General Crittenden's position. The Knoxville Register, says that General Crittenden now has his headquarters at Gainesboro', on the Cumberland river From a member of Gen. Carroll's brigade, who left there on Tuesday night last, we learn that the force there is perfectly organized, the camp in good order, and in the receipt of ample supplies. The enemy have not crossed the river at Mill Springs, with the exception of small parties of skirmishers. They seem to be deterred by a well founded dread of a flank movement by our forces. Southern arms. The Fayetteville (N. C.) Armory is turning out some highl
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
resting facts concerning the situation at Savannah; Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the Savannah river, is a strong casemated work, which, it is believed, the enemy can neither pass, take, nor starve out. All large vessels must come under its guns. The whole space between the city and the ocean is cut up and intersected by rivers, creeks, cuts, and openings. How many of these have been obstructed, and how, is not for us to say. Wall's Cut is an opening from Port Royal into the Savannah river, with some 7 or 8 feet depth at high water. This out opens into the Savannah river about six miles above Fort Pulaski, and of course out of the range of its guns. Into this cut the enemy's light gunboats had come, and were trying to force their way into the Savannah river, but had not succeeded at the latest dates. On the Georgia side of the river the Lincolnites have availed themselves of two openings known as Wilmington Creek and Freeborn's Out, connecting
Warsaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 6
into the Savannah river, with some 7 or 8 feet depth at high water. This out opens into the Savannah river about six miles above Fort Pulaski, and of course out of the range of its guns. Into this cut the enemy's light gunboats had come, and were trying to force their way into the Savannah river, but had not succeeded at the latest dates. On the Georgia side of the river the Lincolnites have availed themselves of two openings known as Wilmington Creek and Freeborn's Out, connecting Warsaw Sound with Augustine creek or river, and from thence with savannah river. These two openings run for some distance through the marsh, quite near to the main river — say, within half a mile, and this at a point opposite Wall's Cut, and about two miles from it. It was between these vessels in the cuts, on both sides the Savannah river, that Tatuall's fleet had to pass on their way to Fort Pulaski on Tuesday of last week, and received a heavy fire from the vessels on both sides. Of the natur
Mill Springs (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
, your obedient servant, M. L. Bonnam, Brig. Gen., 1st Brigade, 1st Corps. Army of the Potomac. General Crittenden's position. The Knoxville Register, says that General Crittenden now has his headquarters at Gainesboro', on the Cumberland river From a member of Gen. Carroll's brigade, who left there on Tuesday night last, we learn that the force there is perfectly organized, the camp in good order, and in the receipt of ample supplies. The enemy have not crossed the river at Mill Springs, with the exception of small parties of skirmishers. They seem to be deterred by a well founded dread of a flank movement by our forces. Southern arms. The Fayetteville (N. C.) Armory is turning out some highly finished fire-arms at this time. The Observer notices a splendid rifle lately manufactured at these works.--It is much the same, in general appearance, as the U. S. rifle for some years past; made at Harper's Ferry, and at Spring field, Mass.; but for certain improvement
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
signation we understand to be as follows: Gen. Bonham was Major General of the forces of South Carolina when he received an appointment of Brigadier General of the Confederate States, and was ordeformed into a brigade. Indeed, there were no regiments in the Confederate service at all in South Carolina when he was appointed. He went on to Richmond, however, with Col. Gregg's regiment of infantry, sent on by the Governor of South Carolina. This regiment was put under his command; and then came Col. Kershaw's, then Bacon's, then Cash's, and other regiments from South Carolina, which, as thSouth Carolina, which, as they came, were, without discrimination, put under his command. Colonel Gregg's regiment being enlisted for six months only, was disbanded by the expiration of its term of service, before the battle of lies.--Charleston Mercury. Salt making. More than a hundred men are now engaged in South Carolina making salt. The Legislature of the State recently appropriated $100,000, in order to encou
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
rittenden now has his headquarters at Gainesboro', on the Cumberland river From a member of Gen. Carroll's brigade, who left there on Tuesday night last, we learn that the force there is perfectly organized, the camp in good order, and in the receipt of ample supplies. The enemy have not crossed the river at Mill Springs, with the exception of small parties of skirmishers. They seem to be deterred by a well founded dread of a flank movement by our forces. Southern arms. The Fayetteville (N. C.) Armory is turning out some highly finished fire-arms at this time. The Observer notices a splendid rifle lately manufactured at these works.--It is much the same, in general appearance, as the U. S. rifle for some years past; made at Harper's Ferry, and at Spring field, Mass.; but for certain improvements, in the matter of sword-bayonet, Maynard primer, and perfection of finish in all parts, it must be pronounced very far superior. The back-sights are set for 300 and 400 yards.
Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 6
Southern intelligence. From Southern journals we collate the following: The situation at Savannah. The contents of a private letter, published by the Wilmington Journal, gives some interesting facts concerning the situation at Savannah; Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the Savannah river, is a strong casemated work, which, it is believed, the enemy can neither pass, take, nor starve out. All large vessels must come under its guns. The whole space between the city and the ocean is cut up and intersected by rivers, creeks, cuts, and openings. How many of these have been obstructed, and how, is not for us to say. Wall's Cut is an opening from Port Royal into the Savannah river, with some 7 or 8 feet depth at high water. This out opens into the Savannah river about six miles above Fort Pulaski, and of course out of the range of its guns. Into this cut the enemy's light gunboats had come, and were trying to force their way into the Savannah ri
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