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West Indies (search for this): article 24
here, but lacked the essential elements truth, General Siegel has not withdrawn his resignation, and will not do so until he has assurance that he can be justly and impartially treated. Mason and Slidell Embarked for England By the British West India mail steamer at Panama, the Panama Herald, of the ultimo, learns that the British gun-board Rinaldo, with Messrs. Slidell and Mason and their Secretaries on board; had reaches St. Thomas on the 15th of January, transferred her passengers to the British West India mail steamer La Plata, bo for Southampton. The New York Custom-House. The quantity of foreign merchandize imported during the month of January was a sufficient to supply the demand; for it's quantity thrown on the market exceeded that imported during the month by about one million of dollars — the value of the merchandize withdrawn from warehouse exceeding the value of that placed in store by about this sum. There has been a constant though gradual, decrease in t
Panama City (Panama) (search for this): article 24
l elements truth, General Siegel has not withdrawn his resignation, and will not do so until he has assurance that he can be justly and impartially treated. Mason and Slidell Embarked for England By the British West India mail steamer at Panama, the Panama Herald, of the ultimo, learns that the British gun-board Rinaldo, with Messrs. Slidell and Mason and their Secretaries on board; had reaches St. Thomas on the 15th of January, transferred her passengers to the British West India mailPanama Herald, of the ultimo, learns that the British gun-board Rinaldo, with Messrs. Slidell and Mason and their Secretaries on board; had reaches St. Thomas on the 15th of January, transferred her passengers to the British West India mail steamer La Plata, bo for Southampton. The New York Custom-House. The quantity of foreign merchandize imported during the month of January was a sufficient to supply the demand; for it's quantity thrown on the market exceeded that imported during the month by about one million of dollars — the value of the merchandize withdrawn from warehouse exceeding the value of that placed in store by about this sum. There has been a constant though gradual, decrease in the amount of goods in bond al
Shipping Point, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 24
d there. He went out to the house of Widow Taylor, who is his aunt. He says he told his aunt's folks that some of our pickets were posted at his gate. Widow Taylor has at least one son in the rebel army. A squadron of Stewart's rebel cavalry had been at her house about a week ago, and had taken forty-three head of cattle from people residing in that neighborhood. Activity of rebel batteries on the Lower Potomac. Sunday being the rebels' fancy day for firing, the batteries at Shipping Point opened on the Maryland shore after breakfast. A number of shells were thrown across, one of them bursting over the land, while others did not appear to explode. One of the shells exploded immediately on leaving the gun, the boiling up of the water close in to the Virginia shore indicating where the fragments fell. After wasting a great deal of powder the rebels ceased firing, thus concluding the morning service. In the afternoon they opened fire again, the shells bursting as in the m
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 24
ardly able to subsist themselves. But I am confident no movement of this kind is intended. General Schoepff's brigade has been moved South, five miles from Somerset, to the river, and General Thomas has now possession of this place. General Manson's brigade occupies the entrenchments at Mill Spring, where they cannot long rceived. In reply, I will state that it would afford me great pleasure to comply with your request; but I am informed the body of Gen. Zollicoffer was removed to Somerset, and has been from there sent to his home in Tennessee, in charge of one of your surgeons who was taken prisoner by the United States forces in the engagement ofays longer where they were, that all their provisions were in their haver-sacks when they marched. He thinks if we had had a general in the place of Schoepff at Somerset, that their whole force could have been captured. Federal account of the last skirmish at Occoquan. Monday afternoon another little skirmish occurred ne
Monticello (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 24
the supply trains, General Sehoepff will move forward to Monticello, with General Manson's and General Curtin's brigades, an left to die. Mill Spring, Jan. 28. --A visit to Monticello revealed to Gen. Hanson the fact that not less than one nts was shown. A fear existed that Boyls would cross to Monticello and cut off the rear. The crossing of the river was begun at an early hour in the day. Many of the men reached Monticello at dusk, and the main force had passed that point at midnhe point of the convergence of the roads from Rowena and Monticello was passed. Gen. Crittenden and staff were among the fi to the sick or wounded. Aspect of the country. Monticello, lately occupied by the Confederate troops, is describedpassed. The Confederate wounded. On the read to Monticello we saw wounded in every house, with the exception of theg the left lung, and who walked from the battle-field of Monticello.--He says at least 150 men were drowned in crossing the
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 24
t eloquent.--I cannot detail the hundreds of other instances that I might name, nor have I the full list of the wounded. Among the many wounded at this place I find the following of the Fifteenth Mississippi alone, who have just given me their names: John Buckley, in thigh. John Goodrich, in thigh. B. F. Watson, in thigh. John Lucas, badly burned; has negro servant with him. Wm. A Turner, in foot. B. D. Clemens, arm and side — a cousin of Jerre Clemens, of Huntsville, Ala. Thomas J. Stearns, in knee. W. G. Chisholm. Wallace B. Skurr, right arm. At the same place is Henry E. Graves, of Nashville, a member of the Twentieth Tennessee, who was shot through the left side the ball penetrating the left lung, and who walked from the battle-field of Monticello.--He says at least 150 men were drowned in crossing the Cumberland river, and corroborates the statement of another that the officers in the boats used their swords on the men to keep them
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 24
hinks if we had had a general in the place of Schoepff at Somerset, that their whole force could have been captured. Federal account of the last skirmish at Occoquan. Monday afternoon another little skirmish occurred near the banks of the Occoquan.--It was reported in the morning that a body of rebels was at Pohick ChurchOccoquan.--It was reported in the morning that a body of rebels was at Pohick Church. Captain Lowing, of the 3d Michigan regiment, Col. Chainplin, then on picket duty in front of General Heintzelman's division, took thirty-four men, under Lieutenant Brennan, from Company F, and forty-four, under Lieut. Bryan, from Company H, and went to meet them. Arriving at Pohick Church, no rebels were seen. The party, however, proceeded to the banks of the Occoquan, opposite the town of that name. Arriving there early in the afternoon, a few unarmed men were observed drilling in the town. They gave the alarm; when a number of rebels came from the houses and fired on our men. A brief skirmish took place. Four of the rebels were seen to fall, and w
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 24
negro servant with him. Wm. A Turner, in foot. B. D. Clemens, arm and side — a cousin of Jerre Clemens, of Huntsville, Ala. Thomas J. Stearns, in knee. W. G. Chisholm. Wallace B. Skurr, right arm. At the same place is Henry E. Graves, of Nashville, a member of the Twentieth Tennessee, who was shot through the left side the ball penetrating the left lung, and who walked from the battle-field of Monticello.--He says at least 150 men were drowned in crossing the Cumberland river, and corroborates the statement of another that the officers in the boats used their swords on the men to keep them from swamping the boats, thus killing a great many, who sank to the bottom. Wallace B. Skurr, wounded in the right arm, does not require the wealth which he professes to have to the amount of $300,000, to make him a gentleman. His gentlemanly demeanor and manners are naturally his. --He speaks, acts, and appears like a gentleman. He made a statement of much interest
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 24
int to the river. As soon as it is possible to arrange the supply trains, General Sehoepff will move forward to Monticello, with General Manson's and General Curtin's brigades, and own, while the river points further South will be held by Gen. Boyle's brigade. This route to Nashville will be held at all hazards, as its present occupation threatens the rear of General Buckner. This force will prove a strong and able one, and may yet act in concert with General McCook, in an attack upon Bowling Green, if such an attack is ever made, which is extremely doubtful. Confederate sick left to die. Mill Spring, Jan. 28. --A visit to Monticello revealed to Gen. Hanson the fact that not less than one hundred and seventy-five sick and wounded rebels had be on left to die at that place, ten miles from the river, which they knew we could not cross. On the morning of Tuesday subsequent to the fight many of those left had died, and the bodies of three others were found a mile beyond.
Peru, Ind. (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 24
their contracts to the highest bidders.--Indeed, it is known that such down right swindling has been proven that the people will be amazed when it is made public. The immaculate Thurlow Weed figures very conspicuously in the testimony. Some twenty more witnesses have been subpoenaed for tomorrow, from whom some spicy evidence is expected. As the committee will likely leave for Albany on Thursday, it is not probable that their investigation will be completed this week. The Minister to Peru The Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary, Mr. Christopher Robinson, from the United States, was only receiver by the Peruvian authorities on the 10th ult The whole civic and military powers of Limit were in requisition to do honor to the veteran, and to evince sympathy and regard for the honored Republic which he represented. Cotton and the universal Yankee in Nicaragua. The Herald's Nicaraguan correspondent says: The civil war in the United States and the blocka
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