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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Zollicoffer (search for this): article 2
several spans of the bridge at Florence connecting with Tuscumbia. There were six steamboats at Florence, two of which were captured. The other four were set on fire and burned by the citizens of Florence. A private dispatch received this evening from Decatur, says everything is quiet. The trains will run regularly again on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. New Orleans, Feb. 10.--Private and general dispatches sustain the report that reconnoitering gun-beats had gone up the Tennessee river as high as Florence. Nashville, Feb. 10.--A private dispatch received last night from Florence states that the gun-boats had left that place. Fort Donaldson had been largely reinforced, but no advices received of movements there. Ex-Gov. W. Campbell declines the tender of the appointment of a Brigadier General, and assigns as a reason his physical inability to perform the duties of the office. He was to have filled the place vacated by the death of Gen. Zollicoffer.
Jonathan B. Young (search for this): article 2
n Tyler, representative elect, went off very quietly, the news of the disaster to our arms at Roanoke Island seeming to cast a damper over the spirits of those usually in the habit of indulging in boisterous manifestations. We give only the returns from the First and Second Wards, some confusion in the counting of the Third Ward vote causing the clerks to evacuate the polling precinct at an early hour in the evening. The vote in Jefferson Ward was, Jas Lyons, 263; Wm. H. Macfarland, 172; Geo. W. Randolph, 34; Jno. B. Young, 13; John Robertson, 5; Robert Saunders, 4; Martin Meredith Lipscomb, 2. In Madison Ward, Jas. Lyons, 321; Wm. H. Macfarland, 202;. Geo. W. Randolph, 29; John Robertson; 12; Robert Saunders, 11; John B. Young, 9. It is said that Lyons's majority in Monroe Ward is 15, and in the city 137 over all others. His majority at Henrico Court-House is stated to be in the neighborhood of 300. Several days must elapse before the final result will be ascertained.
Jonathan B. Young (search for this): article 9
instantly directed my Aid, Lieutenant Drayton, to accompany Col. Stiles to the road along which his regiment was advancing, and to statio it in position by the side of the other Georgia troops. On entering the fort with Capt. Read's company they were cordially greeted by both officers and men. The vigorous attack from the fleet continued unabated, with still no decided damage to any of their ships. About 12.30 P. M. I again went out of the fort, with my Assistant Adjutant-General, Captain Young, for the purpose of mustering together the infantry and reseves, and have them in readiness for any eventuality. Before leaving, however, I turned over the command to Col. Heyward, with directions to hold out as long as any effective fire could be returned. Having mounted our horses, we rejoined the troops near hospital No. 2. I received information through one of the videttes that a steamer and small boats were sounding close to the besch; I detached Capt. Berry, with three compa
John B. Young (search for this): article 2
n Tyler, representative elect, went off very quietly, the news of the disaster to our arms at Roanoke Island seeming to cast a damper over the spirits of those usually in the habit of indulging in boisterous manifestations. We give only the returns from the First and Second Wards, some confusion in the counting of the Third Ward vote causing the clerks to evacuate the polling precinct at an early hour in the evening. The vote in Jefferson Ward was, Jas Lyons, 263; Wm. H. Macfarland, 172; Geo. W. Randolph, 34; Jno. B. Young, 13; John Robertson, 5; Robert Saunders, 4; Martin Meredith Lipscomb, 2. In Madison Ward, Jas. Lyons, 321; Wm. H. Macfarland, 202;. Geo. W. Randolph, 29; John Robertson; 12; Robert Saunders, 11; John B. Young, 9. It is said that Lyons's majority in Monroe Ward is 15, and in the city 137 over all others. His majority at Henrico Court-House is stated to be in the neighborhood of 300. Several days must elapse before the final result will be ascertained.
Joseph A. Yates (search for this): article 9
eft flank of the water front were under the direction of Captain Bedon, ninth regiment South Carolina volunteers, the flanking and rear guns of the fort were mansed by detachments from Captains Bedon's, Cannuady's, and White's companies, ninth regiment South Carolina volunteers, Major F. D Lee, South Carolina Englneers, and constructing engineer of Fort Walker, not only fought gallatly at the batteries, but afforded valuable assistance at other points in work during he contest. Captain Joseph A. Yates, battalion South Carolina Artillery and acting orduance officer was zealous in the execution of the all the duties assigned to him. Towards the close of the fight he was severely wounded, but has since recovered, and is gain ready, in an other field, to resist all maranders that approach our shores. Dr. Ogeer and his able assistants, Drs. W. C. Ravenel and William Ellioti a volunteer from Savannah, Georgia, were present and rendered efficient service in the hospitals. I cannot
men in the field, of which fifty thousand are cavalry, and such a powerful weight of artillery as will soon demonstrate that "Henven is always on the side of the strongest batteries." There is no terror to Southern minds in all this gasconade, and contempt of both God and man. The batties which have already taken place ought to satisfy even infidel scoffers that the battle is not always to the strong, and that there is a Providence above human wisdom and power, which directs and controls the issues of battles, as of all other earthly affairs. As to the army of 700,000, that is 100,000 more than was pretended even by the lying reports of Cameron, and, in all probability, just double the actual number in the field. Half of that number is a vast force, but it is not magnificent enough for the inventive Herald. It requires something approaching the host of Xerxes to suit his imagination — a host which, in its character and destiny, seems to have profigured the Grand Army of Lincolndom.
Samuel Worrell (search for this): article 6
Killed. --Samuel Worrell, a boy aged 15 years, was killed at Danville, Va., several days ago, by companion named Samuel Angel. Worrell was suffering intense pain from a swollen foot, and in his agony begged Angel to kill him. Not thinking the gun was loaded, and having no idea of doing mischief, Angel took down a fowling piece, fired and killed his companion. The affair created much excitement in Danville. Killed. --Samuel Worrell, a boy aged 15 years, was killed at Danville, Va., several days ago, by companion named Samuel Angel. Worrell was suffering intense pain from a swollen foot, and in his agony begged Angel to kill him. Not thinking the gun was loaded, and having no idea of doing mischief, Angel took down a fowling piece, fired and killed his companion. The affair created much excitement in Danville.
A. S. Woolbridge (search for this): article 7
lk Iron Manufacturing Company, of the county of Floyd, was reported from the Committee on Agriculture and Manufactures. Mr. West offered a resolution that the House meet daily at ten o'clock A. M., until the military bill shall be disposed of. Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, objected, and the resolation laid over under the rule. On motion of Mr. Dabney, the House took up and considered the bill authorizing the County Court of Powhatan to correct the assessment on the lands of A. S. Woolbridge's estate. The bill was passed. The following resolution of inquiry into expediency was adopted: By Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt — Of incorporating a company to manufacture salt at Big Lick, in Roanoke county. Mr. McCamant offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That leave be given to bring in a bill providing for the confiscation of lands of citizens of the United States, west of the Alleghanies, and transferring to loyal citizens of the Commonwealth, righ
Wooderidge (search for this): article 7
House of Delegates. Monday, Feb. 10, 1862. The House met at eleven o'clock. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Wooderidge, of the Episcopal denomination. A bill to incorporate the Westfolk Iron Manufacturing Company, of the county of Floyd, was reported from the Committee on Agriculture and Manufactures. Mr. West offered a resolution that the House meet daily at ten o'clock A. M., until the military bill shall be disposed of. Mr. Robertson, of Richmond, objected, and the resolation laid over under the rule. On motion of Mr. Dabney, the House took up and considered the bill authorizing the County Court of Powhatan to correct the assessment on the lands of A. S. Woolbridge's estate. The bill was passed. The following resolution of inquiry into expediency was adopted: By Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt — Of incorporating a company to manufacture salt at Big Lick, in Roanoke county. Mr. McCamant offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That leave
John Withers (search for this): article 9
yton; as also that of the gentlem comprising my volunteer staff, Captains Cheves, H Rose, E. Lynch, J. E. Eddings, J. J. Middleton, Jr. and Joseph M. Huger. The names of the officers and men not mentioned in my report, will be found deservedly mentioned in the official reports of the Colonels of regiments, commandants of batteries, and chiefs of the general staff. I have the honor to be. Respecfully, yours, [Singed.] Thos. F. Drayton. Brigadieir-General commanding. [Official] John Withers.A. A. Genral. Heanq'rs Departement South Carolina, Charleston, Nov. 17, 1861. It might be proper to remark upon the within report, there are probably some in advertent in accurac as --or to give a report of movements and ordes from these head quarters, and instructions given after news was received that the enemy's fleet was intended, for Port Royal, and how they were carried out and followed I deem, however, that no good would result to the service from a discusssion of these po
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