hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Tennessee River (United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
A. H. Foote 16 0 Browse Search
O. Jennings Wise 16 4 Browse Search
Frank Johnston 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,246 total hits in 562 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Beauregard (search for this): article 10
becomes relaxed, and dissase then steps in to do us tenfold more harm than would a dozen pitched battles. The announcement to the troops by either Johnston or Beauregard, that active operations were about to be commenced, would, like magic, out down our lists of sick, and infuse fresh vigor into the frames of those who have just emerged from the hospitals. But this announcement, from present appearances, is far in the distance. Once in a while Beauregard tosses a hope to us. Not long since he told the Marylanders that he intended, with his own hands, to plant the battle flag of their regiment upon the Battle monument in Baltimore city. His promise lea lip his words were passed, and each heart was aflame with enthusiasm. It has passed now. The battle flag still remains at Camp Cheanpeake with the exiles, and Beauregard is no nearer the city of Baltimore than when he tittered those prectous words of promise. I do not question the of our much-loved General. Far from it. He ma
Frank Johnston (search for this): article 10
ps. Action is the panacea for an army; indolence in its bane. If it keep in motion, the minds of the soldiers are always occupied, and their physical powers brought into play. If it keep to its encampments, the monotonous routine of duties soon wears down the spirits of the soldiers; physical exertion is almost wholly suspended, mind and body becomes relaxed, and dissase then steps in to do us tenfold more harm than would a dozen pitched battles. The announcement to the troops by either Johnston or Beauregard, that active operations were about to be commenced, would, like magic, out down our lists of sick, and infuse fresh vigor into the frames of those who have just emerged from the hospitals. But this announcement, from present appearances, is far in the distance. Once in a while Beauregard tosses a hope to us. Not long since he told the Marylanders that he intended, with his own hands, to plant the battle flag of their regiment upon the Battle monument in Baltimore city. His
Baltimore City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 10
les. The announcement to the troops by either Johnston or Beauregard, that active operations were about to be commenced, would, like magic, out down our lists of sick, and infuse fresh vigor into the frames of those who have just emerged from the hospitals. But this announcement, from present appearances, is far in the distance. Once in a while Beauregard tosses a hope to us. Not long since he told the Marylanders that he intended, with his own hands, to plant the battle flag of their regiment upon the Battle monument in Baltimore city. His promise leaped like wild fire throughout the army; from lip to lip his words were passed, and each heart was aflame with enthusiasm. It has passed now. The battle flag still remains at Camp Cheanpeake with the exiles, and Beauregard is no nearer the city of Baltimore than when he tittered those prectous words of promise. I do not question the of our much-loved General. Far from it. He may know of things of which we do not even dream, and
A Yanner Oddicial Staterment of the killed and wounded at Mill Sprise --Dr. W. W. Strew, of General Schoeff's brigade, gives the follwing report of lthe killed and woulded on both sider in the Mill Spring battle: Federals wounded 134 killed 36. Confederates brought into Federal quartera and wounds dressed, 74 killed and buried on the fild, 190.
Yanner Oddicial Staterment (search for this): article 11
A Yanner Oddicial Staterment of the killed and wounded at Mill Sprise --Dr. W. W. Strew, of General Schoeff's brigade, gives the follwing report of lthe killed and woulded on both sider in the Mill Spring battle: Federals wounded 134 killed 36. Confederates brought into Federal quartera and wounds dressed, 74 killed and buried on the fild, 190.
W. W. Strew (search for this): article 11
A Yanner Oddicial Staterment of the killed and wounded at Mill Sprise --Dr. W. W. Strew, of General Schoeff's brigade, gives the follwing report of lthe killed and woulded on both sider in the Mill Spring battle: Federals wounded 134 killed 36. Confederates brought into Federal quartera and wounds dressed, 74 killed and buried on the fild, 190.
history the heroic fortitude of our galiant troops. Nobly and well did Capt. O. Jennings Wise, of your city, stand up with his men to the fierce encounter, when, suddenly, he was shot through the side and instantly fell. One of his men asking him if he was much hurt--"Not much," said he, "but fight them yet." He was borne from the scene of action in a blanket.--About 300 of our brave boys fell, and nearly all the rest were either wounded or taken prisoners. The enemy's loss is laid down at 1000. Four of their ships were sunk, they doing but little damage to any of our boats. Com. Lynch and other parts of our fleet did noble service — his ship being among the first to open fire on the enemy's shipping. At last accounts they were in pursuit of Com. Lynch. In the midst of this terrible struggle, it will be regretted that Gen. Wise was seriously indisposed at Nag's Head. Both he and his son are expected here to-day. I am sorry to say that but very few escaped from Capt. Wise's
, is not still onward? True, the news comes that the hospitable town of Elizabeth City has been shelled and burned, and that the vandal hordes are desolating the pleasant places of the Sound coast. But they cannot go far into the interior, and the day is coming when these Northern minious shall be driven back in disgrace to their in hospitable and barren soil. Gen. Wise, though still sick, is, I learn, on his way to this city. Captain O. Jeanings Wise was dangerously wounded. Major Lawson, Lieut. Miller and Capt. Coles, are reported a mong the killed. The enemy lost in killed and wounded one thousand, our loss three hundred, besides more than two thousand prisoners. We must be nerved for a vigorous resistance, and Providence will assist us as heretofore in this cause of honor, and truth, and human rights. How we fought at Roanoke. The Norfolk Day Book gives the following concerning the desperate courage exhibited by our troops at Roanoke: It is said that th
O. Jennings Wise (search for this): article 11
history the heroic fortitude of our galiant troops. Nobly and well did Capt. O. Jennings Wise, of your city, stand up with his men to the fierce encounter, when, sudLynch. In the midst of this terrible struggle, it will be regretted that Gen. Wise was seriously indisposed at Nag's Head. Both he and his son are expected here to-day. I am sorry to say that but very few escaped from Capt. Wise's company. Large quantities of ammunition were saved by our troops. The women, children, and shall be driven back in disgrace to their in hospitable and barren soil. Gen. Wise, though still sick, is, I learn, on his way to this city. Captain O. Jeanings said to have been the case particularly with the Richmond Blues, under command of Capt. O. Jennings Wise. Capt. Wise, we learn, fell bravely, urging his men on. s said to have been the case particularly with the Richmond Blues, under command of Capt. O. Jennings Wise. Capt. Wise, we learn, fell bravely, urging his men on.
onward? True, the news comes that the hospitable town of Elizabeth City has been shelled and burned, and that the vandal hordes are desolating the pleasant places of the Sound coast. But they cannot go far into the interior, and the day is coming when these Northern minious shall be driven back in disgrace to their in hospitable and barren soil. Gen. Wise, though still sick, is, I learn, on his way to this city. Captain O. Jeanings Wise was dangerously wounded. Major Lawson, Lieut. Miller and Capt. Coles, are reported a mong the killed. The enemy lost in killed and wounded one thousand, our loss three hundred, besides more than two thousand prisoners. We must be nerved for a vigorous resistance, and Providence will assist us as heretofore in this cause of honor, and truth, and human rights. How we fought at Roanoke. The Norfolk Day Book gives the following concerning the desperate courage exhibited by our troops at Roanoke: It is said that the enemy came u
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...