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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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the closing of the Southern ports with stones, but if it has, it is done in more becoming language than that employed by the English Foreign office, for the same purpose. In London they continue to write to Paris that the French Government is taking the lead in the matter of a recognition of the Confederacy, and declaration of the nullity of the blockade, while in Paris they write to London that it is the English Government which is taking the lead. The statement so often repeated, that in July last the French Government proposed a recognition to the English Government, continues to circulate uncontradicted, and yet it would be important to know what foundation there is for such a report. It would be difficult to say upon what fact or facts the irritation against us al Paris is cased. The commerce at Rouen and at Lyons is arrested, and a hundred thousand workpeople at least are now living on contributions from the Government and from private individuals; but to provoke a war w
William H. Seward (search for this): article 1
elevating influence of such a political constitution and such a country, without seeing a single act of injustice committed on any one, or suffering a single injury myself, there can be but one loyal wish — namely that I may die, as I have lived, a citizen of the unbroken American Union, and may leave to those who come after me, as we received from those who went before us, all its honored institutions, unimpaired and reinvigorated. I remain, my dear sir, yours sincerely and truly, William H. Seward. To Smith O' Brien, Esq., Killiney, county Dublin, Ireland. The Emperor's speech. The London correspondent of the New York Times writes as follows: The speech of the Emperor was rather a damper to those who expected immediate French intervention. Its saving clause, "as long as neutral rights shall be respected," is some comfort to Messrs. Manu and Yancey But he truth is, that the he just now has his hands full of his own finances. His speech was for the Bourse. It was
McClellan (search for this): article 1
ucceeding in breaking up the Union, and more especially the parentage, education, character, and general antecedents of McClellan. The person of whom his Imperial Majesty demanded this information is acquainted thoroughly with the South and the coast line along the Southern States. He is a fellow-townsman of McClellan, was on intimate terms with the General's father, an Irish surgeon, who settled at Philadelphia, and who was noted for his kindness of heart, shrewdness of character, and straightforward, original manners, as well as his great success as a medical practitioner. Surgeon McClellan was also celebrated for the good advice he was in the habit of giving to the young folk of the city in which he lived, and gave, years age, t"the conversation turned to the Commander-in-chief of the United States army. If Napoleon was not already aware that Gen. McClellan was trained in the art of war at the military academy of West Point, and in the Crimean war with the "Jeunesse strang
f the British Government towards the prisoners, and to promote their comfort on board his ship; and they speak in the same manner of the behavior and conduct of all the British officers, both of the naval and merchant service, with whom they have come in contact. Mr Slidell left here by the 11.30 A. M. Train for London, whence he proceeds to Paris, where Mrs. Slidell and family are awaiting his arrival. Mr. Mason followed by the 2 o'clock train, a telegram having been received from Captain Pegram, who is in London, that he would wait there to meet him. There was a considerable crowd of persons collected on the dock-quay when the Plata came alongside, as, indeed, there always is on the arrival of a West India mail steamer, and the number was undoubtedly increased as the news spread that Mason and Slidell were on board — curiosity to see the four men whose case has figured so prominently before the world during the last two months, and who are said by the Times to have cost thi
s, but if it has, it is done in more becoming language than that employed by the English Foreign office, for the same purpose. In London they continue to write to Paris that the French Government is taking the lead in the matter of a recognition of the Confederacy, and declaration of the nullity of the blockade, while in Paris theet it would be important to know what foundation there is for such a report. It would be difficult to say upon what fact or facts the irritation against us al Paris is cased. The commerce at Rouen and at Lyons is arrested, and a hundred thousand workpeople at least are now living on contributions from the Government and from , both of the naval and merchant service, with whom they have come in contact. Mr Slidell left here by the 11.30 A. M. Train for London, whence he proceeds to Paris, where Mrs. Slidell and family are awaiting his arrival. Mr. Mason followed by the 2 o'clock train, a telegram having been received from Captain Pegram, who is in
then driven by the violence of the storm that was raging to Bermuda They all landed at Bermuda, and remained there one day. Admiral Milue ordered the Rinaldo to take them on to St. Thomas to catch the mail steamer for England, offering the Commissioners, however, if they preferred it, to send them on in Her Majesty's ship Racer, but they expressed themselves well satisfied with the Rinaldo, and accordingly proceeded in her. She left Bermuda on the 10th inst., and arrived at St., Thomas on the 14th, about two hours before the Fleta sailed for this port. The health of the prisoners has not suffered in any way by their confinement in Fort Warren, although they describe both the prison and the treatment they received as being very bad. Capt. Hewitt, of the Rinaldo, did everything in his power to testify the kindly feelings of the British Government towards the prisoners, and to promote their comfort on board his ship; and they speak in the same manner of the behavior and conduct of all
and by being followed brought in Europe a young and unknown American, after a few years steady industry, to a position honorable in the highest degree. After listening to the history of the respectable old Irish emigrant, who, His Majesty was also informed, from the rapid manner in which he performed the old-fashioned operation on those afflicted with the Dolores was nicknamed "Core tic doloreux instanter,"the conversation turned to the Commander-in-chief of the United States army. If Napoleon was not already aware that Gen. McClellan was trained in the art of war at the military academy of West Point, and in the Crimean war with the "Jeunesse strangere," which attached itself to the French army, he was on this occasion informed of it, as well as the high probity and unflinching strength of character which, irrespective of great intellectual qualities, would be sufficient to mark him out as one of the leading men in the American Union. Circumstances illustrative of them were
Livingston (search for this): article 1
t attempt to get up any sort of demonstration on the part of the spectators; not a cheer was raised, and when the released prisoners left the Plata they passed on shore, and to their hotel, just as any ordinary passengers. Some of the officers of the Nashville waited upon Messrs Mason and Slidell to pay their respects, immediately on the arrival of the Plata. Reward's letter to Smith O'Brien. Washington, Dec. 24, 1861 Mr. Dear Sir. I have received your letter of these of Livingston, it is a pleasant stream. stance, in these times of care and anxiety, to know that the generous friendship which was so long ago formed between us has, on your part, as it has on my own, survived the accidents of time and distance. I thank you sincerely, moreover, for the interest in the affairs of my country which prompted your communication, and I have not the least disposition to complain that you gave it to the press before it could reach my hands. The subject in not a private,
William Smith (search for this): article 1
ce of such a political constitution and such a country, without seeing a single act of injustice committed on any one, or suffering a single injury myself, there can be but one loyal wish — namely that I may die, as I have lived, a citizen of the unbroken American Union, and may leave to those who come after me, as we received from those who went before us, all its honored institutions, unimpaired and reinvigorated. I remain, my dear sir, yours sincerely and truly, William H. Seward. To Smith O' Brien, Esq., Killiney, county Dublin, Ireland. The Emperor's speech. The London correspondent of the New York Times writes as follows: The speech of the Emperor was rather a damper to those who expected immediate French intervention. Its saving clause, "as long as neutral rights shall be respected," is some comfort to Messrs. Manu and Yancey But he truth is, that the he just now has his hands full of his own finances. His speech was for the Bourse. It was peace all over.
January 24th (search for this): article 1
European News. From our late Northern files we continue to extract from the latest European intelligence as follows: The American question — Attitude of France. The correspondent of the New York Times, writing from Paris, under date of Jan, 24th, says: The French Government has probably protested against the closing of the Southern ports with stones, but if it has, it is done in more becoming language than that employed by the English Foreign office, for the same purpose. In London they continue to write to Paris that the French Government is taking the lead in the matter of a recognition of the Confederacy, and declaration of the nullity of the blockade, while in Paris they write to London that it is the English Government which is taking the lead. The statement so often repeated, that in July last the French Government proposed a recognition to the English Government, continues to circulate uncontradicted, and yet it would be important to know what foundation ther
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