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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 24
g upon them was the election of a Speaker to preside over their future deliberations. The nomination of candidates for Speaker being in order, Mr. Foote, of Tennessee, offered a resolution declaring Hon. Thos. S. Bocock, of Virginia, the choice of the House for Speaker. The resolution of Mr. Foote was adopted with but one or outh Carolina, a committee of two was appointed to conduct him to the chair. The presiding officer appointed Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic address, which was listened to with marked attention, and was received, at its moved the House proceed to the election of a Clerk and put in nomination Mr. Emmett Dixon of Georgia. Mr. Pryon, of Virginia, nominated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, nominated Mr. McDonald, of Virginia, and earnestly supported the nomination. He spoke of
United States (United States) (search for this): article 24
t, after which he proceeded to administer the following oath, which was done by calling up the delegations from the several states of the Confederacy: "You and each of you do solemnly swear that you will support the Constitution of the Confederate States: So help you God." This was the most deeply impressive part of the whole ceremony. As the delegation from each State gathered around the desk of the Speaker, a solemn stillness pervaded the entire hall, and the whole crowd, members anof Virginia, the choice of the House for Speaker. The resolution of Mr. Foote was adopted with but one or two dissenting voices, and Mr. Bocock was duly declared the Speaker elect of the first Congress under the permanent Government of the Confederate States. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, a committee of two was appointed to conduct him to the chair. The presiding officer appointed Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, th
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 24
House of Representatives. At 12 o'clock precisely, the House was called to order by Hon. Howell Cobb, of Georgia, the presiding officer of the late Provisional Congress, who stated that it was made his duty by an act of the Provisional Congress to preside over the Permanent Congress until its organization. An earnest and impressive prayer was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Duncan, of the M. E. Church. The call of the roll of the members was then commenced, and at its conclusion the presited the permanent Constitution of this Southern Confederacy. Again, I thank you. When the Speaker had concluded his marks, Mr. Cury, of Alabama, moved the House proceed to the election of a Clerk and put in nomination Mr. Emmett Dixon of Georgia. Mr. Pryon, of Virginia, nominated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, nominated Mr. McDonald, of Virginia, and earnestly supported the nomination. He spoke of Mr. McD's posi
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 24
ell also of the self-sacrifice, patriotism, and enlarged statement ship of the Congress which inaugurated the permanent Constitution of this Southern Confederacy. Again, I thank you. When the Speaker had concluded his marks, Mr. Cury, of Alabama, moved the House proceed to the election of a Clerk and put in nomination Mr. Emmett Dixon of Georgia. Mr. Pryon, of Virginia, nominated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, non 17. Mr. Dixon having received a majority of the votes call was duly declared elected Clerk of the State of Representatives. Mr. Russell of Virginia, moved that House process the election of a and the choice call upon Mr. R. H. Wyne Alabama. Thus ended the organization of the permanent Congress of our new Government body upon which rests on a graver respectability than ever before a burdened the mind body, and who process of a deliberated to with the keenest acceding will be l
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 24
tional liberty. He hold it would be the pleasure of the house to Mr. McDonald, which would be an evidence on the part of the House, in his organization, to disregard former political opinion in the selection of its officers. A member from Missouri nominated Mr. Thomas M. Johnson, in that State, and sustained his nomination by an appropriate and touching allude to the sacrifices made by her citizens, at the sufferings she had endured to release herself from the oppressive thraldom of the abortion Government. Mr. Johnson was of eminent qualifications, and the State of Missouri would accept as a big compliment his selection as the Clerk of the first Congress under the new Government. The Clerk then proceeded to call the roll, of the following result: First vote — Dixon 32, Cluskey 33, Johnson 21, McDonald 7. Miltons withdrew the name of Mr. McDonald, and the House proceeded to a second vote, as follows — Dixon 41, Cluskey 27, Johnson 19. being no election, a third and final vo
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 24
The resolution of Mr. Foote was adopted with but one or two dissenting voices, and Mr. Bocock was duly declared the Speaker elect of the first Congress under the permanent Government of the Confederate States. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, a committee of two was appointed to conduct him to the chair. The presiding officer appointed Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic adSouth Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic address, which was listened to with marked attention, and was received, at its conclusion, with warm applause: Gentlemen of the House of Representatives: I return to you my sincere thanks for the honor you have done me, in selecting me to preside over your deliberations, during this the first Congress under our permanent Constitution. And I desire to say that it will be my one great aim, in discharging the duties of this office, so to conduct myself as to show to you and to the world th
duty devolving upon them was the election of a Speaker to preside over their future deliberations. The nomination of candidates for Speaker being in order, Mr. Foote, of Tennessee, offered a resolution declaring Hon. Thos. S. Bocock, of Virginia, the choice of the House for Speaker. The resolution of Mr. Foote was adopted wiMr. Foote was adopted with but one or two dissenting voices, and Mr. Bocock was duly declared the Speaker elect of the first Congress under the permanent Government of the Confederate States. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, a committee of two was appointed to conduct him to the chair. The presiding officer appointed Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic address, which was listened to with marked attention, and was received, at its conclusion, with warm applause: Gentlemen of the House of Representatives: I return to you my sincere thanks for the honor
nated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, nominated Mr. McDonald, of Virginia, and earnestly supported the nomination. He spoke of Mr. McD's positions one of the editors of as influentad seriously labored for the maintenance of constitutional liberty. He hold it would be the pleasure of the house to Mr. McDonald, which would be an evidence on the part of the House, in his organization, to disregard former political opinion in thent. The Clerk then proceeded to call the roll, of the following result: First vote — Dixon 32, Cluskey 33, Johnson 21, McDonald 7. Miltons withdrew the name of Mr. McDonald, and the House proceeded to a second vote, as follows — Dixon 41, Cluskey 2Mr. McDonald, and the House proceeded to a second vote, as follows — Dixon 41, Cluskey 27, Johnson 19. being no election, a third and final vote was had, which decided the contest in favor of Mr. Dixon. Third vote — Dixon 44, Cluskey 16, Johnson 17. Mr. Dixon having received a majority of the votes call was duly declared elected
W. Cluskey (search for this): article 24
the election of a Clerk and put in nomination Mr. Emmett Dixon of Georgia. Mr. Pryon, of Virginia, nominated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, nominated Mr. McDonald, of Virginiss under the new Government. The Clerk then proceeded to call the roll, of the following result: First vote — Dixon 32, Cluskey 33, Johnson 21, McDonald 7. Miltons withdrew the name of Mr. McDonald, and the House proceeded to a second vote, as follows — Dixon 41, Cluskey 27, Johnson 19. being no election, a third and final vote was had, which decided the contest in favor of Mr. Dixon. Third vote — Dixon 44, Cluskey 16, Johnson 17. Mr. Dixon having received a majority of the votes call wCluskey 16, Johnson 17. Mr. Dixon having received a majority of the votes call was duly declared elected Clerk of the State of Representatives. Mr. Russell of Virginia, moved that House process the election of a and the choice call upon Mr. R. H. Wyne Alabama. Thus ended the organization of the permanent Congress of<
ged enabling them to tell also of the self-sacrifice, patriotism, and enlarged statement ship of the Congress which inaugurated the permanent Constitution of this Southern Confederacy. Again, I thank you. When the Speaker had concluded his marks, Mr. Cury, of Alabama, moved the House proceed to the election of a Clerk and put in nomination Mr. Emmett Dixon of Georgia. Mr. Pryon, of Virginia, nominated Mr. W. Cluskey, of Tennessee, and supported the nomination earnestly. Mr. Lyons, of Virginia, nominated Mr. McDonald, of Virginia, and earnestly supported the nomination. He spoke of Mr. McD's positions one of the editors of as influential journal in this city a journal which, he said, had take an early and decided and in defence of our rights, and which had seriously labored for the maintenance of constitutional liberty. He hold it would be the pleasure of the house to Mr. McDonald, which would be an evidence on the part of the House, in his organization, to disr
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