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ith their wagons and baggage. Gen. Curtis reports having taken more prisoners than he knows what to do with. Particulars of the Retaking of Springfield. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Democrat, dated Springfield, 15th, says:--Our army under Gen. Curtis marched from Lebanon on the 10th and formed in three divisions, the right under Colonel Jeff. C. Davis, the left under Colonel Carr, and the centre under General Siegel. Six miles from Springfield, on the 12th, a skirmish took place between our advance and a party of rebels, in which nine of the latter were killed, and one or our men was slightly wounded. At sunset on the same day 300 of the enemy attacked our pickets, but were driven back with a loss of three. This was regarded as the commencement of the battle, and two hundred cavalry and infantry, with a battery of artillery, were sent forward. The battery was placed on an eminence commanding the supposed approach of the rebels, and three
Latest from the North.surrender of Fort Donelson.Official reports.great losses on both sides. &c., &c., &c. We are in possession of Northern papers of the 17th inst. All of them teem with "the latest" and "the very latest" intelligence from Fort Donelson, the capture of which is heralded in the most imposing and largest sized capitals. The Baltimore Sun, of Monday, publishes an extra dated at 2 P. M. of that day, from which we make the following extracts: The fall of Donelson. We have this morning, through the "Associated Press," some stirring intelligence.--Fort Donelson, in Tennessee, is said to have surrendered to the Federal forces, with 15,000 prisoners, including Gens. Johnston, Buckner and Pillow. The captured fort was made of earth, and was constructed last summer; situated at Dover, on the west bank of the Cumberland, where that river washes an obtuse angle. It is 12 miles southeast of the latter fort, and, it is stated, mounted about ten 24 and 32 pounder
February 14th (search for this): article 9
lling back to meet McIntosh, who is coming up with reinforcements, and on his joining him he would return and give us battle. The probabilities are, however, that he is in full retreat. The people in and around Springfield express undoubted satisfaction at the arrival of our troops, and general rejoicing is manifested throughout the Southwest at the retreat of the rebels. This expedition will doubtless end the campaign in Missouri. Union victory in upper Virginia. Pawpaw, Va., Feb. 14 --8 P. M.--Major-General G. B. McClellan: The railroad was opened to Hancock this morning; also, the telegraph. We had an important forced reconnaissance last night, which was completed to-day. We broke up the rebel nest at Blooming Gap.--We ran down and captured seventeen (17) commissioned officers — among them Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Captains, &c. I will forward a description list. We engaged them with four hundred cavalry. Our infantry were not near enough to sup
February 15th (search for this): article 9
ur later than previous accounts.] Chicago, Feb. 17.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated "Camp in the Field, February 15, 6 P. M.," says: The right wing commenced storming the fort about noon to-day, and have taken the right wing of thghting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Missouri Democrat, dated Saturday, Feb. 15, P. M., says: Commander Foote reached here at twelve o'clock last night, on board the U. S. gunboat Conestoga. Another account. Chicago, Feb. 16. --The Tribune's special correspondence is as follows: Fort Donelson, Feb. 15.--Forenoon.--The firing commenced yesterday at day break and continued at upheavals all day. Up to four o'clock no moves lag Officer, Com' Naval Force Western Division. The President thanks the army and Navy. Washington City, D. C., Feb. 15. --The President, Commander-in-Chief of the army and navy, returns thanks to Brig.-Gen. Burnside and Flag Officer G
February 16th (search for this): article 9
dispatches are as follows: Cincinnati, February 16.--The Commercial has received the following ting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Missouri Deand the battle was to be renewed. Cairo, Feb. 16.--The steamer Minnehsha arrived here from Forte position of Affairs on Friday. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --The Democrat has a special dispatch f... A Sorties by the enemy. Chicago, Feb. 16. --Captain Wise, of the steamer Minnehshistance above. Still Later.--St. Louis, Feb. 16.--Dispatches received at headquarters say that Our troops in possession. Louisville, Sunday, Feb. 16. --Gen. Mitchell's troops have crossrear guard defeated and Scouted. St. Louis. Feb. 16. --General Halleck has received dispatch of the Retaking of Springfield. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Democrat, d A Circular from Gen. Halleck. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --The following circular has been issue[1 more...]
February 17th (search for this): article 9
ing the above, we learn that ten regiments now in the Ohio camps are ordered at once to the Cumberland. Washington, Feb. 17.--In the House, this morning, Mr. Colfax asked and readily obtained permission to make a statement relative to Fort Donelth applause and laughter.] [This dispatch appears to be about one hour later than previous accounts.] Chicago, Feb. 17.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated "Camp in the Field, February 15, 6 P. M.," says: The right wing commencedforces are now almost breast to breast, ready to open the work of death upon each other at any moment. Cincinnati, Feb. 17, A. M.--Fort Donelson was taken yesterday with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Buckner and Johnson. St. Louis, Feb. 17.--Dispatches from General Grant to General Hallock announce the surrender of Fort Donelson, with 15,000 prisoners, including Generals Johnson, Buckner, and Pillow. The Singe--three days fighting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis,
February 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 9
taken by our troops commands the main work of Fort Donelson, and Gen. Grant telegraphs that he would be able to capture that fort to-day, (Sunday.) Dispatch from Com. Foote. U. S. Flag-Ship St. Louis,Near Fort Donelson, via Paducah, February 15, 1862. To Hon. Gibson Welles, Secretary of the Navy: Sir: I made an attack on Fort Donelson yesterday, at 3 o'clock P. M., with four iron-clad gunboats and two wooden ones, and after one hour and a quarter severe fighting, the latter part y and stronghold, and that it shall forever be honored and respected, as the emblem of Liberty and Union, in every land and upon every sea. By order of the President: The by Caution of Bowling Green--why it was done. Louisville, Saturday, Feb. 15, 1862. To Maj.-Gen. McClellan: Mitchell's Division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day, making a bridge to cross. The enemy had burnt the bridge at 1 o'clock in the morning, and were evacuating the place when he
aid to have surrendered to the Federal forces, with 15,000 prisoners, including Gens. Johnston, Buckner and Pillow. The captured fort was made of earth, and was constructed last summer; situated he protection of the bridge and the communication with Nashville. It is also reported that General Buckner left Bowling Green ten or twelve days ago with ten thousand men, supposed to be destined fo of the United States, with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Gen. A. Sidney Johnston and Gen. Buckner. Floyd ran and escaped. There has been very heavy loss on both sides. [When the faci, Feb. 17, A. M.--Fort Donelson was taken yesterday with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Buckner and Johnson. St. Louis, Feb. 17.--Dispatches from General Grant to General Hallock announce the surrender of Fort Donelson, with 15,000 prisoners, including Generals Johnson, Buckner, and Pillow. The Singe--three days fighting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. -
te of these reinforcements is probably 40,000 men. General Buell, we understand, goes with General McCook's division to ing, and were evacuating the place when he arrived. D. C. Buell, Brig.-Gen. Comd'g. [From the Washington Star, ofo-day, the General-in-Chief has received a dispatch from Gen. Buell, announcing that his advance, under Gen. Mitchell, reach and Stripes over it, the river being but to cross. Gen. Buell had for some days past been concentrating a large force mmediately by the fall of Nashville before the main body of Buell's army, and the fall of Knoxville before the division of Gen. Thomas. Neither Buell or Thomas can meet with any resistance to speak of in marching directly on those most important strs point is as yet exceedingly meagre, consisting only of Gen. Buell's very brief dispatch. That, however, is enough to showtunate that they have been allowed to escape. But from General Buell's reticence, and his interdiction upon the telegraph, i
Ambrose Burnside (search for this): article 9
sultation with Gen. Grant and my own officers here, I determined to retire until we could repair damages by bringing up a competent force from Cairo to attack the fort. I have sent the Tyler to the Tennessee river to render the railroad bridge impassable. A. H. Foote, Flag Officer, Com' Naval Force Western Division. The President thanks the army and Navy. Washington City, D. C., Feb. 15. --The President, Commander-in-Chief of the army and navy, returns thanks to Brig.-Gen. Burnside and Flag Officer Goldsborough, and to Brig.-Gen. Grant and Flag-Officer Foote, and the land and naval forces under their respective commands, for their gallant achievements in the capture of Fort Henry and Roanoke Island. While it will be no ordinary pleasure for him to acknowledge and reward, in becoming manner, the valor of the living, he also recognizes his duty to pay fitting honor to the memory of the gallant dead. The charge at Roanoke Island, like the bayonet charge at
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