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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
, doubtless, to march directly on to Nashville after having reduced Bowling Green. It is the impression in military circles here, that on evacuating their Bowling Green stronghold last night, the main body, if not all the rebel army, fled directly toward Nashville; as to attempt to reinforce Fort Donelson instead, would be well nigh a hopeless undertaking, and would inevitably be followed almost immediately by the fall of Nashville before the main body of Buell's army, and the fall of Knoxville before the division of Gen. Thomas. Neither Buell or Thomas can meet with any resistance to speak of in marching directly on those most important strategic positions, if the army running away from Bowling Green has failed in its retreat to aim to cover Nashville, which, by-the-bye, is the main object of the effort of the enemy to continue to hold Fort Donelson. Our troops in possession. Louisville, Sunday, Feb. 16. --Gen. Mitchell's troops have crossed Barren river, and are i
Romney (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
in the dead of night, a complete bridge across the Great Cacapon, at an unfrequented mountain road. Two columns of 2,000 men each, marched thirty-two miles--one column forty-three miles--since 4 P. M. yesterday, besides bridging the river. We made a move and occupied the Bloomery Gap and Point Mills east, on the belief (by information obtained from deserters) that General Casson's brigade was there. Gen. Dunning has just arrived at New creek from Moorefield, forty miles south of Romney. He has captured 225 beef battle, and broke up the guerilla haunt there. Two of his men were badly wounded. He killed several of the rebels. The enemy have thus been driven out of this department. F. W. Lander, Brig.-Gen. Skirmish in Western Virginia. The Cincinnati Times says that a skirmish occurred last Saturday on Linn creek, Logan county, Va. A detachment of the 5th Virginia regiment, under Capt. Smith, twenty-one in number, pursued and attacked thirty-two of Jenkins's
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
rted that Price is merely falling back to meet McIntosh, who is coming up with reinforcements, and on his joining him he would return and give us battle. The probabilities are, however, that he is in full retreat. The people in and around Springfield express undoubted satisfaction at the arrival of our troops, and general rejoicing is manifested throughout the Southwest at the retreat of the rebels. This expedition will doubtless end the campaign in Missouri. Union victory in upper Virginia. Pawpaw, Va., Feb. 14 --8 P. M.--Major-General G. B. McClellan: The railroad was opened to Hancock this morning; also, the telegraph. We had an important forced reconnaissance last night, which was completed to-day. We broke up the rebel nest at Blooming Gap.--We ran down and captured seventeen (17) commissioned officers — among them Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, Captains, &c. I will forward a description list. We engaged them with four hundred cavalry. Our infantry
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
elligence.--Fort Donelson, in Tennessee, is said to have surrendered to the Federal forces, with 15,000 prisoners, including Gens. Johnston, Buckner and Pillow. The captured fort was made of earth, and was constructed last summer; situated at Dover, on the west bank of the Cumberland, where that river washes an obtuse angle. It is 12 miles southeast of the latter fort, and, it is stated, mounted about ten 24 and 32 pounders. Some seven or eight post roads intersect at this point, and the as far up as Clarksville, and, in conjunction with Fort Henry and Tennessee bridge, as breaking off from the Confederates some 20 miles of railroad communication. The next point of attack will probably be Clarksville, about thirty miles from Dover, and where the railroad crosses the Cumberland. It is stated that extensive and formidable Confederate works have been in construction there for two or three months, and a large number of heavy guns have been sent thither for the protection of t
Guyandotte (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Jenkins's cavalry. The result was a loss on the rebel side of eight killed and seven wounded, and the remainder captured, with upward of thirty horses. Of the Federals, one was killed and one wounded. The captured and their captors arrived at Guyandotte on Wednesday evening. Mr. Reader, our informant, is a private in Captain Smith's company, and was engaged in the affair. He gives an interesting account of the skirmish. The rebels were surprised, being employed, when attacked, in feeding their horses from the crib of a Union man, now a refugee. Among the rebels killed was Stevens, who participated in the butchery of a small party of Platt's Zouaves, sometime since. All were engaged in the raid on Guyandotte. A Circular from Gen. Halleck. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --The following circular has been issued from headquarters: "All persons who are known to have been in arms against the United States, or to have actively aided the rebellion by word or deed, are to
Mill Springs (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 9
ide and Flag Officer Goldsborough, and to Brig.-Gen. Grant and Flag-Officer Foote, and the land and naval forces under their respective commands, for their gallant achievements in the capture of Fort Henry and Roanoke Island. While it will be no ordinary pleasure for him to acknowledge and reward, in becoming manner, the valor of the living, he also recognizes his duty to pay fitting honor to the memory of the gallant dead. The charge at Roanoke Island, like the bayonet charge at Mill Springs, proves that the close grapple and sharp steel of loyal and patriotic soldiers must always put rebels and traitors to flight. The late achievements of the navy show that the flag of the Union, once borne in proud glory around the world by naval heroes, will soon again float over every rebel city and stronghold, and that it shall forever be honored and respected, as the emblem of Liberty and Union, in every land and upon every sea. By order of the President: The by Caution of Bowli
A. Sidney Johnston (search for this): article 9
lowing extracts: The fall of Donelson. We have this morning, through the "Associated Press," some stirring intelligence.--Fort Donelson, in Tennessee, is said to have surrendered to the Federal forces, with 15,000 prisoners, including Gens. Johnston, Buckner and Pillow. The captured fort was made of earth, and was constructed last summer; situated at Dover, on the west bank of the Cumberland, where that river washes an obtuse angle. It is 12 miles southeast of the latter fort, and, m Cairo informing him of the arrival of the gunboat Carondolet at that place this morning, bringing the news of the capture of Fort Donelson on yesterday by the land forces of the United States, with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Gen. A. Sidney Johnston and Gen. Buckner. Floyd ran and escaped. There has been very heavy loss on both sides. [When the fact of Floyd having ran was announced, it was greeted with applause and laughter.] [This dispatch appears to be about one ho
istance, the rebels fled, leaving the road strewn with their wagons and baggage. Gen. Curtis reports having taken more prisoners than he knows what to do with. Particulars of the Retaking of Springfield. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Democrat, dated Springfield, 15th, says:--Our army under Gen. Curtis marched from Lebanon on the 10th and formed in three divisions, the right under Colonel Jeff. C. Davis, the left under Colonel Carr, and the centre under General Siegel. Six miles from Springfield, on the 12th, a skirmish took place between our advance and a party of rebels, in which nine of the latter were killed, and one or our men was slightly wounded. At sunset on the same day 300 of the enemy attacked our pickets, but were driven back with a loss of three. This was regarded as the commencement of the battle, and two hundred cavalry and infantry, with a battery of artillery, were sent forward. The battery was placed on an eminence comman
ays fighting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Missouri Democrat, dated Saturday, Feb. 15, P. M., says: Commander Foote reached here at twelve o'clock last night, on board the U. S. gunboat Conestoga. He stormed Fort Donelson on Friday afternoon. The gunboats St. Louis, Louisville, Pittsburg, Carondolet, Tyler, and Conestoga, after fighting a little over an hour, withdrew. Fifty-four were killed and wounded on the gunboats, pilots Riley and Hinton, of the St. Louis, being among the latter. Commodore Foote, while standing on the pilot house of the St. Louis, his flag-ship, was slightly wounded. The St. Louis was hit sixty-one times, and two of the gunboats were disabled. The Tyler and Conestoga remained out of range of the enemy's guns. The line of battle was as follows: The St. Louis on the right, next the Louisville, then the Pittsburg, and the Carondolet on the left. The enemy's firing was very acc
Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Missouri Democrat, dated Saturday, Feb. 15, P. M., says: Commander Foote reached here at twelve o'clock last night, on board the U. S. gunboat Conestoga. He stormed Fort Donelson on Friday afternoon. The gunboats St. Louis, Louisville, Pittsburg, Carondolet, Tyler, and Conestoga, after fighting a little over an hour, withdrew. Fifty-four were killed and wounded on the gunboats, pilots Riley and Hinton, of the St. Louis, being among the latter. Commodore Foote, while standing on the pilot house of the St. Louis, his flag-ship, was slightly wounded. The St. Louis was hit sixty-one times, and two of the gunboats were disabled. The Tyler and Conestoga remained out of range of the enemy's guns. The line of battle was as follows: The St. Louis on the right, next the Louisville, then the Pittsburg, and the Carondolet on the left. The enemy's firing was very accurate. They h
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