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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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incinnati Times says that a skirmish occurred last Saturday on Linn creek, Logan county, Va. A detachment of the 5th Virginia regiment, under Capt. Smith, twenty-one in number, pursued and attacked thirty-two of Jenkins's cavalry. The result was a loss on the rebel side of eight killed and seven wounded, and the remainder captured, with upward of thirty horses. Of the Federals, one was killed and one wounded. The captured and their captors arrived at Guyandotte on Wednesday evening. Mr. Reader, our informant, is a private in Captain Smith's company, and was engaged in the affair. He gives an interesting account of the skirmish. The rebels were surprised, being employed, when attacked, in feeding their horses from the crib of a Union man, now a refugee. Among the rebels killed was Stevens, who participated in the butchery of a small party of Platt's Zouaves, sometime since. All were engaged in the raid on Guyandotte. A Circular from Gen. Halleck. St. Louis, Feb. 16
understand, goes with General McCook's division to take command in person on the Cumberland, where our forces will, by to-morrow, number 80,000 men. While he presses the enemy on the Cumberland with his tremendous force, their flank and rear are pressed by the heavy divisions under General Mitchell and General Nelson. Since writing the above, we learn that ten regiments now in the Ohio camps are ordered at once to the Cumberland. Washington, Feb. 17.--In the House, this morning, Mr. Colfax asked and readily obtained permission to make a statement relative to Fort Donelson, [profound silence.] He said that Gen. McClellan had authorized him to inform the House that he had just received a dispatch from Cairo informing him of the arrival of the gunboat Carondolet at that place this morning, bringing the news of the capture of Fort Donelson on yesterday by the land forces of the United States, with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Gen. A. Sidney Johnston and Gen. Buckne
A. H. Foote (search for this): article 9
Missouri Democrat, dated Saturday, Feb. 15, P. M., says: Commander Foote reached here at twelve o'clock last night, on board the U. S. ley and Hinton, of the St. Louis, being among the latter. Commodore Foote, while standing on the pilot house of the St. Louis, his flag-ur gunboats were pretty effectually disabled, except one. Commodore Foote was Wounded twice, but not seriously. The upper redoubt tbe able to capture that fort to-day, (Sunday.) Dispatch from Com. Foote. U. S. Flag-Ship St. Louis,Near Fort Donelson, via Paducah, Feb the Tennessee river to render the railroad bridge impassable. A. H. Foote, Flag Officer, Com' Naval Force Western Division. The Prede and Flag Officer Goldsborough, and to Brig.-Gen. Grant and Flag-Officer Foote, and the land and naval forces under their respective command of Generals Thomas and Crittenden, and the rear operations of Commodore Foote and General Grant, rendered the place untenable. A few days m
he Federals, one was killed and one wounded. The captured and their captors arrived at Guyandotte on Wednesday evening. Mr. Reader, our informant, is a private in Captain Smith's company, and was engaged in the affair. He gives an interesting account of the skirmish. The rebels were surprised, being employed, when attacked, in feeding their horses from the crib of a Union man, now a refugee. Among the rebels killed was Stevens, who participated in the butchery of a small party of Platt's Zouaves, sometime since. All were engaged in the raid on Guyandotte. A Circular from Gen. Halleck. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --The following circular has been issued from headquarters: "All persons who are known to have been in arms against the United States, or to have actively aided the rebellion by word or deed, are to be arrested. Those who are accused of acts in violation of the laws of war, such as the destruction of railroads and bridges, and private property, firing
. Price had left at 2 o'clock on the same morning, leaving behind over 600 of his sick with large quantities of forage and wagons. He had twelve thousand effective troops and fifty pieces of artillery. Yesterday evening a battalion of our cavalry captured ten wagons of his train, and last night firing by our pickets was heard in the direction of the retreating foe. This morning, at 6 o'clock, our whole force followed the enemy. It is reported that Price is merely falling back to meet McIntosh, who is coming up with reinforcements, and on his joining him he would return and give us battle. The probabilities are, however, that he is in full retreat. The people in and around Springfield express undoubted satisfaction at the arrival of our troops, and general rejoicing is manifested throughout the Southwest at the retreat of the rebels. This expedition will doubtless end the campaign in Missouri. Union victory in upper Virginia. Pawpaw, Va., Feb. 14 --8 P. M.--Ma
William Jenkins (search for this): article 9
Romney. He has captured 225 beef battle, and broke up the guerilla haunt there. Two of his men were badly wounded. He killed several of the rebels. The enemy have thus been driven out of this department. F. W. Lander, Brig.-Gen. Skirmish in Western Virginia. The Cincinnati Times says that a skirmish occurred last Saturday on Linn creek, Logan county, Va. A detachment of the 5th Virginia regiment, under Capt. Smith, twenty-one in number, pursued and attacked thirty-two of Jenkins's cavalry. The result was a loss on the rebel side of eight killed and seven wounded, and the remainder captured, with upward of thirty horses. Of the Federals, one was killed and one wounded. The captured and their captors arrived at Guyandotte on Wednesday evening. Mr. Reader, our informant, is a private in Captain Smith's company, and was engaged in the affair. He gives an interesting account of the skirmish. The rebels were surprised, being employed, when attacked, in feeding t
wards, to Unger's store. Major Frothingham is entitled to great credit for building, under my direction, in four hours in the dead of night, a complete bridge across the Great Cacapon, at an unfrequented mountain road. Two columns of 2,000 men each, marched thirty-two miles--one column forty-three miles--since 4 P. M. yesterday, besides bridging the river. We made a move and occupied the Bloomery Gap and Point Mills east, on the belief (by information obtained from deserters) that General Casson's brigade was there. Gen. Dunning has just arrived at New creek from Moorefield, forty miles south of Romney. He has captured 225 beef battle, and broke up the guerilla haunt there. Two of his men were badly wounded. He killed several of the rebels. The enemy have thus been driven out of this department. F. W. Lander, Brig.-Gen. Skirmish in Western Virginia. The Cincinnati Times says that a skirmish occurred last Saturday on Linn creek, Logan county, Va. A detachm
ays: The right wing commenced storming the fort about noon to-day, and have taken the right wing of the enemy's fortifications, over which the Stars and Stripes are now floating. The opposing forces are now almost breast to breast, ready to open the work of death upon each other at any moment. Cincinnati, Feb. 17, A. M.--Fort Donelson was taken yesterday with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Buckner and Johnson. St. Louis, Feb. 17.--Dispatches from General Grant to General Hallock announce the surrender of Fort Donelson, with 15,000 prisoners, including Generals Johnson, Buckner, and Pillow. The Singe--three days fighting--Federal gunboats disabled. St. Louis, Feb. 16. --A special dispatch to the Missouri Democrat, dated Saturday, Feb. 15, P. M., says: Commander Foote reached here at twelve o'clock last night, on board the U. S. gunboat Conestoga. He stormed Fort Donelson on Friday afternoon. The gunboats St. Louis, Louisville, Pittsburg,
he rebels were retreating, forced marches were ordered by Mitchell, to save, if possible, the railroad and turnpike bridges Barren river. They had, however, been destroyed. Gen. Mitchell reached the banks of the river all the way here, betweeank and rear are pressed by the heavy divisions under General Mitchell and General Nelson. Since writing the above, we e, Saturday, Feb. 15, 1862. To Maj.-Gen. McClellan: Mitchell's Division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowlitch from Gen. Buell, announcing that his advance, under Gen. Mitchell, reached the river opposite Bowling Green yesterday by tely, or sufficient of it to render it impassable. Gen. Mitchell at once set about constructing another, under the proteight evacuated their Bowling Green stronghold, of which Gen. Mitchell is now, doubtless, in possession, as no enemy was left s in possession. Louisville, Sunday, Feb. 16. --Gen. Mitchell's troops have crossed Barren river, and are in possessi
ossible, the railroad and turnpike bridges on Big Barren river. They had, however, been destroyed. Gen. Mitchell reached the banks of the river all the way here, between Bowling Green and Nashville. It is believed that the divisions of McCook and Thomas embarked at the mouth of Salt River on steamers for the Cumberland on Saturday night and yesterday. The troops that have been in the camp of instruction at Barostown were at Louisville yesterday, embarking for the Cumberland River. Three Indiana regiments, with a battery of artillery, leave New Albany to-day. The aggregate of these reinforcements is probably 40,000 men. General Buell, we understand, goes with General McCook's division to take command in person on the Cumberland, where our forces will, by to-morrow, number 80,000 men. While he presses the enemy on the Cumberland with his tremendous force, their flank and rear are pressed by the heavy divisions under General Mitchell and General Nelson. Since w
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