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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
House of Representatives. Saturday, Feb. 22, 1862. The House met at 11½ o'clock, the Speaker in the Chair. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Duncan. The Clerk read the Journal of yesterday, which was approved. Hen. Mr. Munnerlyn, of Georgia, appeared and took the oath. Mr. Foote asked for a reconsideration of the resolution of yesterday adjourning the House until 12 o'clock, and moved that the House assemble immediately after the inaugural ceremonies were concluded. Public exigencies might require an earlier meeting of the House than the hour indicated in the resolution. Some suggestions of the inaugural address might possibly demand the consideration of the House. He had come here not toddle his time, but to meet the emergencies which the condition of the Government imposed upon him. He had understood that the public defences required attention. Mr. Currin, of Tennessee, submitted to his honorable colleague whether it was not desirable to have deliberate actio
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 3
d understood that the public defences required attention. Mr. Currin, of Tennessee, submitted to his honorable colleague whether it was not desirable to have deified character. Mr. Conrad, of Va., would inquire of the gentleman from Tennessee whether he had received any intimation from the President that suggestions wourprised at the course of the remarks. The proposition of the gentleman from Tennessee was simply one based upon the probability that some suggestions might be submountry. Mr. Conrad would state for the information of the gentleman from Tennessee, who was not a member of the late Provisional Congress, that ample appropriatuse with but a word. In response to a reference by the honorable member from Tennessee to the defences of Richmond city, he had to state, that on consultation with ought proper to make in connection with the representation by the member from Tennessee. The resolution of Mr. Foote was then, on his motion, laid upon the tabl
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
m Tennessee, who was not a member of the late Provisional Congress, that ample appropriations, extending for several months, based upon the estimates of heads of departments, had been made for the support of our army and for the public defences, and if the departments had not taken the proper steps for our security, the fault was not with Congress. Mr. Payor had to detain the House with but a word. In response to a reference by the honorable member from Tennessee to the defences of Richmond city, he had to state, that on consultation with the Secretary of War this morning, he was assured, somewhat to his surprise, and infinitely to his gratification, that he has concerted the most expedient and efficient defences against a water approach to Richmond, insomuch as at least to detain the enemy until an army could be collected here to repel the invader. This statement he thought proper to make in connection with the representation by the member from Tennessee. The resolu
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
tion with the Secretary of War this morning, he was assured, somewhat to his surprise, and infinitely to his gratification, that he has concerted the most expedient and efficient defences against a water approach to Richmond, insomuch as at least to detain the enemy until an army could be collected here to repel the invader. This statement he thought proper to make in connection with the representation by the member from Tennessee. The resolution of Mr. Foote was then, on his motion, laid upon the table. Mr. Garland, of Arkansas, offered a resolution that 1,000 copies of the Inaugural Address be printed for the use of the members of this House. Mr. Curry opposed the resolution. The inaugural of the President was not a communication to Congress. Mr. Jones inquired if a copy was in possession of the House. The Speaker announced that he knew of none. Mr. Garland withdrew the resolution, when, on motion of Mr. Smith, the House adjourned until Monday.
rmy could be collected here to repel the invader. This statement he thought proper to make in connection with the representation by the member from Tennessee. The resolution of Mr. Foote was then, on his motion, laid upon the table. Mr. Garland, of Arkansas, offered a resolution that 1,000 copies of the Inaugural Address be printed for the use of the members of this House. Mr. Curry opposed the resolution. The inaugural of the President was not a communication to Congress. laid upon the table. Mr. Garland, of Arkansas, offered a resolution that 1,000 copies of the Inaugural Address be printed for the use of the members of this House. Mr. Curry opposed the resolution. The inaugural of the President was not a communication to Congress. Mr. Jones inquired if a copy was in possession of the House. The Speaker announced that he knew of none. Mr. Garland withdrew the resolution, when, on motion of Mr. Smith, the House adjourned until Monday.
might possibly demand the consideration of the House. He had come here not toddle his time, but to meet the emergencies which the condition of the Government imposed upon him. He had understood that the public defences required attention. Mr. Currin, of Tennessee, submitted to his honorable colleague whether it was not desirable to have deliberate action, and whether such action was likely to be had so soon after the ceremonies incident to inauguration. Mr. Foote knew of no reason whyrtant for this House to convene earlier than Monday, with a view to their consideration. Mr. Foote said the condition of public affairs required the attention of Congress. The scriptural injunction was, "What thou doest, do quickly." Mr. Currin was of the opinion that the circumstances surrounding the members after the inaugural would preclude anything like deliberate action. Mr.Smith, of Virginia, was rather surprised at the course of the remarks. The proposition of the gentlem
Isaac Smith (search for this): article 3
kly." Mr. Currin was of the opinion that the circumstances surrounding the members after the inaugural would preclude anything like deliberate action. Mr.Smith, of Virginia, was rather surprised at the course of the remarks. The proposition of the gentleman from Tennessee was simply one based upon the probability that sobest calculated to facilitate the establishment of our national independence, and give peace, safety, and a sense of permanent security to our whole people. Mr. Smith asked if the gentleman had any particular information requiring the adoption of the resolution. If not he thought it might probably lie over until Tuesday. e. Mr. Curry opposed the resolution. The inaugural of the President was not a communication to Congress. Mr. Jones inquired if a copy was in possession of the House. The Speaker announced that he knew of none. Mr. Garland withdrew the resolution, when, on motion of Mr. Smith, the House adjourned until Monday.
on after the ceremonies incident to inauguration. Mr. Foote knew of no reason why the gravity of members should be disturbed by the incidents of the day. He had no doubt that the ceremonies would be of a grave and dignified character. Mr. Conrad, of Va., would inquire of the gentleman from Tennessee whether he had received any intimation from the President that suggestions would be made which render it important for this House to convene earlier than Monday, with a view to their considis resolution was offered to elicit anything that might be important for its consideration. He did not regard the condition of our public affairs as hopeless, but the House had not been permitted to know the real condition of the country. Mr. Conrad would state for the information of the gentleman from Tennessee, who was not a member of the late Provisional Congress, that ample appropriations, extending for several months, based upon the estimates of heads of departments, had been made for
David B. Jones (search for this): article 3
ion with the Secretary of War this morning, he was assured, somewhat to his surprise, and infinitely to his gratification, that he has concerted the most expedient and efficient defences against a water approach to Richmond, insomuch as at least to detain the enemy until an army could be collected here to repel the invader. This statement he thought proper to make in connection with the representation by the member from Tennessee. The resolution of Mr. Foote was then, on his motion, laid upon the table. Mr. Garland, of Arkansas, offered a resolution that 1,000 copies of the Inaugural Address be printed for the use of the members of this House. Mr. Curry opposed the resolution. The inaugural of the President was not a communication to Congress. Mr. Jones inquired if a copy was in possession of the House. The Speaker announced that he knew of none. Mr. Garland withdrew the resolution, when, on motion of Mr. Smith, the House adjourned until Monday.
ate action, and whether such action was likely to be had so soon after the ceremonies incident to inauguration. Mr. Foote knew of no reason why the gravity of members should be disturbed by the incidents of the day. He had no doubt that the ceremonies would be of a grave and dignified character. Mr. Conrad, of Va., would inquire of the gentleman from Tennessee whether he had received any intimation from the President that suggestions would be made which render it important for this House to convene earlier than Monday, with a view to their consideration. Mr. Foote said the condition of public affairs required the attention of Congress. The scriptural injunction was, "What thou doest, do quickly." Mr. Currin was of the opinion that the circumstances surrounding the members after the inaugural would preclude anything like deliberate action. Mr.Smith, of Virginia, was rather surprised at the course of the remarks. The proposition of the gentleman from Tennessee
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