hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 154 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph R. Anderson 15 3 Browse Search
Stephen Green 15 1 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 14 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Alexander Scott 12 0 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
W. L. Yancey 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 274 total hits in 46 results.

1 2 3 4 5
urning house beyond. Earl Derby on recognition. We get the following from the New York Herald of the 26th February: In the House of Lords on the 7th instant the Earl of Derby said he was not much in the habit of occupying the time of their lordships with matters personal to himself, or with making observations in rer. R. Semmes, Commander. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the Earl of Carnarvon was anxious to ascertain the truth, or rather to obtain from Her Majesty's Government a contradiction of a story which had been in circulaterican government the noble lord had not forgotten to ask for compensation for the outrage. Mr. Gregory on the blockade. In the House of Commons, on the 7th inst., Mr. Gregory said that he had been unwilling, on the previous evening, to introduce any subject which could give rise to a debate, but there was one topic which
ernment will at least feel that it will not be justly responsible for the vast quantity of blood which shall have been shed, nor for the great and wide-spread suffering which so prolonged a conflict will have entailed upon millions of the human race, both in the Eastern as well as upon the North American continent. W. L. Yancey, P. A. Rost, A. Dudley Mann. Earl Russell's reply. Foreign Office, Aug. 24, 1861. The undersigned has had the honor to receive the letter of the 14th inst., addressed to him by Messrs. Yancey, Rost, and Mann, on behalf of the so-styled Confederate States of North American. The British Government do not pretend in any way to pronounce a judgment upon the questions in debate between the United States and their adversaries in North America; the British Government can only regret that these differences have unfortunately been submitted to the arbitrament of arms. Her Majesty has considered this contest as constituting a civil war, and her M
claiming to be their sovereign, and the de facto Governments of Greece, of Belgium, and Italy, would induce it to recognize the Government of the Confederate States of American upon the happening of events exhibiting a deep seated and abiding confidence that success will attend their efforts. At all events, reconstruction of the Union is an impossibility. The brief history of the past confirms them in this belief. Since the organization of the Government of the Confederate States in February last, and since Mr. Lincoln assumed the reins of Government in the United States, and commenced preparing his aggressive policy against the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France an
February 26th (search for this): article 6
The Niagara's Mails.the British State papers on American affairsletter from Capt. Semmes, of the Sumter. &c., &c., &c., &c., The New York papers of Feb. 26, received at this office on Friday evening last, contain full details of news by the Niagara, which had already been briefly forwarded by telegraph. We extract a portion of the papers relating to the war in America, published in the London Post, of February, 8th, omitting the earlier correspondence, which dates as far back as Novembon which the American civil war has brought as near to ourselves as a neutral State as if no broad Atlantic lay between us and the burning house beyond. Earl Derby on recognition. We get the following from the New York Herald of the 26th February: In the House of Lords on the 7th instant the Earl of Derby said he was not much in the habit of occupying the time of their lordships with matters personal to himself, or with making observations in reference to the reports of his speec
August 14th (search for this): article 6
ures would be nearly excluded from the North, and freely admitted in the South. Other observations were made, but not of very great importance. The delegates concluded by stating that they should remain in London for the present, in the hope that the recognition of the Southern Confederacy would not be long delayed, I am, &c., J. Russell The letter of Messrs. Yancey, Rost and Mann. Following the above is a letter addressed by the Commissioners to Earl Russell dated London, August 14. It begins with an allusion to the purposes of the Southern people in throwing off their allegiance to the Federal Government, and argues the question of the right of secession with ability and dignity. It then reviews the previous efforts of the Commissioners to impress the British Government with a sense of the rights justly belonging to the Confederacy, and proceeds as follows: In the interview already alluded to as well as in one of a similar character held between your lordship a
October 29th (search for this): article 6
l the 6th of January, when he received an unconditional discharge. It was also stated their other British subjects had been confined in the same prison, and subject to various restrictions. They had been treated in violation of international rights and privileges. He would not make any comments on the subject, because he could not bring himself to believe that the facts were as they had been stated. Earl Russell, who was very indistinctly heard, was understood to say that on the 29th of October, a letter was written to Lord Lyons by a Mr. Shepherd, saying that while traveling by railway — he had been an agent of the Grand Trunk Railway--he was arrested and sent to a prison in New York, on a charge of conspiracy against the United States. That gentleman further stated the charge was quite untrue, and that he was a loyal British subject. It further appeared that he was asked to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, and refused to do so. Lord Lyons sent a representat
November 15th (search for this): article 6
Lyons by a Mr. Shepherd, saying that while traveling by railway — he had been an agent of the Grand Trunk Railway--he was arrested and sent to a prison in New York, on a charge of conspiracy against the United States. That gentleman further stated the charge was quite untrue, and that he was a loyal British subject. It further appeared that he was asked to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, and refused to do so. Lord Lyons sent a representation to Mr. Seward, and on the 15th of November he wrote a reply, saying that he had at first been led to believe that the gentleman was a citizen of the United States, and that it was under such an impression he had asked him to take the oath of allegiance. But when it turned out that he was a British subject is release was still with held on the ground that he was a spy in the employ of the Confederate States. Mr. Shepherd gave an indignant denial to that accusation, and he was then asked to enter into certain conditions one of wh
June, 1 AD (search for this): article 6
ce, to remain on prison rather than accept a discharge on such terms. He was after wards removed to another prison, and it was said that, after that time, Lord Lyons having interposed, he was offered his liberty on a condition only one degree less extraordinary than the former one, namely, that he would not engage in the service of the Southern States nor have they communication with the inhabitants. He refused that condition and he remained to prison from the 5th of October until the 6th of January, when he received an unconditional discharge. It was also stated their other British subjects had been confined in the same prison, and subject to various restrictions. They had been treated in violation of international rights and privileges. He would not make any comments on the subject, because he could not bring himself to believe that the facts were as they had been stated. Earl Russell, who was very indistinctly heard, was understood to say that on the 29th of October, a le
May, 10 AD (search for this): article 6
suffering and inconvenience, to remain on prison rather than accept a discharge on such terms. He was after wards removed to another prison, and it was said that, after that time, Lord Lyons having interposed, he was offered his liberty on a condition only one degree less extraordinary than the former one, namely, that he would not engage in the service of the Southern States nor have they communication with the inhabitants. He refused that condition and he remained to prison from the 5th of October until the 6th of January, when he received an unconditional discharge. It was also stated their other British subjects had been confined in the same prison, and subject to various restrictions. They had been treated in violation of international rights and privileges. He would not make any comments on the subject, because he could not bring himself to believe that the facts were as they had been stated. Earl Russell, who was very indistinctly heard, was understood to say that on
November, 1860 AD (search for this): article 6
The Niagara's Mails.the British State papers on American affairsletter from Capt. Semmes, of the Sumter. &c., &c., &c., &c., The New York papers of Feb. 26, received at this office on Friday evening last, contain full details of news by the Niagara, which had already been briefly forwarded by telegraph. We extract a portion of the papers relating to the war in America, published in the London Post, of February, 8th, omitting the earlier correspondence, which dates as far back as November, 1860, and is of no possible interest or importance at the present day. With a view to preserve, as history, the official record of the mission of Messrs. Yancey, Rost, and Mann, we commence with. Lord Russell's interview with the Southern Commissioners. Lord Russell, in a dispatch addressed to Lord Lyons on the 11th May, gives an account of an interview he had held with Mr. Yancey and his colleagues. My Lord: On Saturday last I received at my house Mr. Yancey, Mr, Mann, and
1 2 3 4 5