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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 6
appreciated the position in which we of the Confederate States have been placed by these "civilized" nations whose rule of warfare you say has been violated. Great Britain has acknowledged us as a belligerent. This acknowledgement gives us all the rights of war equally with the other party. One of the most essential of these rights on the high seas as the right of destroying the enemy's commerce, and thus disabling him from carrying on the war; a right which Great Britain, in all her wars, has exercised to its fullest extent, and with terrible effect upon her enemies. And when she has not found it convenient to send her prizes into her own ports she hass. The ports of the Confederate States were blockaded on or about the 1st of June, 1861. Subsequently to this period, and with full knowledge of the fact, Great Britain, France, and Spain, and the lesser maritime Powers of Europe, all issued proclamations, defining their positions in the war. In these proclamations they prohib
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 6
he past confirms them in this belief. Since the organization of the Government of the Confederate States in February last, and since Mr. Lincoln assumed the reins of Government in the United States, and commenced preparing his aggressive policy against the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and in such utter perversion of
Cienfuegos (Cuba) (search for this): article 6
would be glad to pursue if the thing were possible for obvious reasons. But if the nations of the earth put it out of our power to pursue this course, is it generous to find fault with us because we do not pursue it? To show you the earnests desire which I had in the beginning of my cruiser to send my prizes in for adjudication rather than take the responsibility of sitting in judgment on them myself I send you enclosed a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Governor of the town of Cienfuegos, in the Island of Cuba, as early as the 6th of July last. This letter will explain itself, and I have only to remark with reference to it, that I had not at its date seen the Spanish proclamation. I rely upon your sense of justice to give place in your columns both to this communication and the letter. R. Semmes, Commander. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the Earl of C
France (France) (search for this): article 6
n and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are risi neutral ports, and there, to have them condemned by her own prize courts. The ports of the Confederate States were blockaded on or about the 1st of June, 1861. Subsequently to this period, and with full knowledge of the fact, Great Britain, France, and Spain, and the lesser maritime Powers of Europe, all issued proclamations, defining their positions in the war. In these proclamations they prohibited belligerent cruisers from bringing their prizes into their ports — except in case of neces
Carnarvon (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 6
nder. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the Earl of Carnarvon was anxious to ascertain the truth, or rather to obtain from Her Majesty's Government a contradiction of a story which had been in circulation during the last we, when he was offered his liberty, it was on the condition that he should for swear his own nationality and swear allegiance to the Northern States. He (Earl of Carnarvon) could hardly believe that such a state of things was possible; but this was the story. It was said that this gentleman with very great courage and constancy resuch a power attached to the President under the Constitution of the States.--He had no objection to produce the correspondence upon the subject. The Earl of Carnarvon was sorry to hear that the facts of the case as he had stated them, and which he could scarcely bring himself to believe, were borne out by the statement of the
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 6
assemblies and their Legislatures have condemned the war as subversive of the Constitution. In addition to these striking evidences of the increased strength of the Confederate States, of great internal weakness and division in Mr. Lincoln's Government, the undersigned can proudly and confidently point to the unity which exists among the people of the eleven Confederate States, with the solitary and unimportant exception of the extreme northwest corner of Virginia, lying between Ohio and Pennsylvania, and settled almost exclusively by Northern emigrants. Whatever differences of opinion, may have been entertained among the people of the United States as to the policy of secession, there was little difference of opinion as to the unconstitutional causes which led to it, and often, by a fair decision at the polls, by the majority in favor of secession as the means of expressing their liberties, the great mass of the people at once glided all objections, and are now engaged with their we
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 6
ates, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and in such utter perversion of the provisions of that instrument, imposed upon them. The undersigned have also sufficient reasons for the belief that even in the northwestern part of the State of Illinois a part of the people have proclaimed open opposition to Mr. Lincoln's unconstitutional and despotic
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): article 6
ot deem it advisable to urge her Majesty's Government to an immediate decision upon so grave a question, but contented themselves with a presentation of the cause of their Government, and have quietly waited upon events to justify all that they had said, with the hope that her Majesty's Government would soon come to the conclusion that the same sense of justice, the same view of duty under the law of nations, which caused it to recognize the de facto Government of Texas while yet a superior Mexican army was contending for supremacy upon its soil, the de facto Governments of the South American republics while Spain still persisted in claiming to be their sovereign, and the de facto Governments of Greece, of Belgium, and Italy, would induce it to recognize the Government of the Confederate States of American upon the happening of events exhibiting a deep seated and abiding confidence that success will attend their efforts. At all events, reconstruction of the Union is an impossibility.
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
them myself I send you enclosed a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Governor of the town of Cienfuegos, in the Island of Cuba, as early as the 6th of July last. This letter will explain itself, and I have only to remark with reference to it, that I had not at its date seen the Spanish proclamation. I rely upon your sense of justice to give place in your columns both to this communication and the letter. R. Semmes, Commander. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the Earl of Carnarvon was anxious to ascertain the truth, or rather to obtain from Her Majesty's Government a contradiction of a story which had been in circulation during the last week or ten days. That story seemed to him so monstrous in the shape in which it had reached this country, that he was almost confident it must be full of exaggeration. It was to the effect that a Canadian gentleman, a Britis
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
paring his aggressive policy against the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and ch exists among the people of the eleven Confederate States, with the solitary and unimportant excepiotism to furnish them, exist within the Confederate States for that purpose. The undersigned ard the existence of the Government of the Confederate States the Government at Washington seems confi, in their opinion the Government of the Confederate States has at this time to a recognition as a Gt upon the questions in debate between the United States and their adversaries in North America; threcognize the successful revolt of those Confederate States. Now, what he did say was, that in his own prize courts. The ports of the Confederate States were blockaded on or about the 1st of Juh some persons engaged in the war in the Confederate States Nothing was found to inculpate him in thork, on a charge of conspiracy against the United States. That gentleman further stated the charge[40 more...]
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