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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
Convulsions in America. That the sentiment of the English people has been misrepresented and falsified by the Northern press, no man can doubt who read the extracts from the speeches delivered at the opening of Parliament, which we gave in yesterday's paper. We have been led to believe that a feeling of decided hostility to the Confederate States exists among the people, and that the Government is strongly against all claims for recognition. Now however, since we have heard the real sentiment from England's representative men we can but believe exactly the reverse is true.--Added to the favorable remarks in yesterday's edition, we give, to-day, some extracts from an article in the January number of Blackwood, undoubtedly the most influential magazine of the day. It commences as follows: Everybody-who-has thought, talked and read much about America of late, must feel that English opinions on the subject, as rendered by the tone of our press, have been qualified by the mediu
barism, they wish further to ascertain what the spirit is in which the war is waged, let them ask the next ardent Northern American whom they meet; whether if the Union is only to be maintained by the rain and desolation of the South, he would wish the struggle to proceed? They will be surprised to hear the calm, cool, highly civilized gentleman at their side testifying to the extent of his fanatic devotion to Abolition or to the Union, by a reply that would disgrace the savages of Central Africa; and we advise these enthusiasms to deliberate before they become known as the abettors of those who have devised the commission of the abomination of desolation. That stone fleet ought to sink the Northern cause. * * * * * * * * * Many people seem to anticipate that even should the present difficulty end without war, the Americans will not fail very soon to inflict upon us some other unendurable insult. This anticipation we do not share; on the contrary, we are confident that
Bordeaux (France) (search for this): article 5
rbid reprisal, and the perfect warrant that the powers who guard civilization possess to interfere in the name of mankind in this envenomed struggle. Imagine a war between France and England conducted on such a principle — on the one side, the channels of the Clyde and the Mersey, on the other, those of the Shine and Garonne, choked to gratify an insane and insatiate spirit of revenge; while the inflicters of these deadly injuries exulted in the facts that Glasgow and Liverpool, Houen, and Bordeaux, were to be destroyed by "a silent blight, falling on them as though out of the night — deadly, inevitable!" Would not the whole world be justified in raising its universal voice against such mad vindictiveness? Let the apologists of the North, whether of the Bright or the Tom Brown school, (if there be such schools,) read the New York 7 Years, and then say whether, as professed humanitarians, they wish any judge to identify themselves with the savage Abolitionists or the frenzied Unionist
Solferino (Italy) (search for this): article 5
kily Gen. McClellan, who is a great man for what he is going to do, has before him the reassuring example of Commander Wilkes, who is a great man for what he has only done. There are many other circumstances to soothe and comfort the future hero. Gen. Jackson and Gen. Scott are among the greatest commanders the world has ever seen. The battle of somebody's Bluff and somebody else's Ferry are among the most important actions that were ever fought, as the victors of Waterloo, Juryman, and Solferino are bound to admit. Bunker's Hill was a great victory. All American history is written to prove, not that Americans have performed great actions, but that the actions were great because they were performed by Americans. Let him who doubts it refer to some history of modern America written by a native, and he will be speedily satisfied that no foreigner would ever willingly undertake the dreary task of wading through the voluminous records, the grand object of which is to render triviali
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
e doing the work of fiends, they had the courage of men. Not so with these Northern destroyers, who, while they launch nothing but big words against the armies of the South, take advantage of their command of the sea to blot out of the map of the world those Southern harbors which were meant for the benefit, not of the South only, but of mankind. The stone fleet, which is supposed already to have done its diabolical office, is intended to choke permanently the channels of Savannah and Charleston harbors. How long will the great Powers of Europe stand by and see such enormities committed? They do not hesitate to interpose by force to stop, the barbarities of savages. In the Lebanon they stop between Druse and Christian, and forbid the indulgence of the vindictiveness which will be satisfied only with the extermination of the foe. But this measure — which would destroy not merely the works of man, which may be restored, but the works of nature, and which seeks, in revenge for a p
France (France) (search for this): article 5
ers of Charleston and Savannah, who see their occupation gone forever, sink a retributive stone fleet in the channels of the harbors blockaded by the squadrons of France or England, and leave the American continent to rot behind the barrier of the Atlantic? It would be a deed of most righteous retribution, and the fact that we cosal, and the perfect warrant that the powers who guard civilization possess to interfere in the name of mankind in this envenomed struggle. Imagine a war between France and England conducted on such a principle — on the one side, the channels of the Clyde and the Mersey, on the other, those of the Shine and Garonne, choked to gratanders in this cut-throat quarrel. The question of the recognition of the Southern Confederacy, and the raising of the ineffectual blockade, in conjunction with France, are entitled to be immediately considered. As it is, our neutrality tells against the South. We do not impute this to anybody as a fault — we merely mention it
Waterloo, Monroe County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 5
ost untried men. But luckily Gen. McClellan, who is a great man for what he is going to do, has before him the reassuring example of Commander Wilkes, who is a great man for what he has only done. There are many other circumstances to soothe and comfort the future hero. Gen. Jackson and Gen. Scott are among the greatest commanders the world has ever seen. The battle of somebody's Bluff and somebody else's Ferry are among the most important actions that were ever fought, as the victors of Waterloo, Juryman, and Solferino are bound to admit. Bunker's Hill was a great victory. All American history is written to prove, not that Americans have performed great actions, but that the actions were great because they were performed by Americans. Let him who doubts it refer to some history of modern America written by a native, and he will be speedily satisfied that no foreigner would ever willingly undertake the dreary task of wading through the voluminous records, the grand object of whic
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
at man for what he is going to do, has before him the reassuring example of Commander Wilkes, who is a great man for what he has only done. There are many other circumstances to soothe and comfort the future hero. Gen. Jackson and Gen. Scott are among the greatest commanders the world has ever seen. The battle of somebody's Bluff and somebody else's Ferry are among the most important actions that were ever fought, as the victors of Waterloo, Juryman, and Solferino are bound to admit. Bunker's Hill was a great victory. All American history is written to prove, not that Americans have performed great actions, but that the actions were great because they were performed by Americans. Let him who doubts it refer to some history of modern America written by a native, and he will be speedily satisfied that no foreigner would ever willingly undertake the dreary task of wading through the voluminous records, the grand object of which is to render trivialities important and nobodies illus
entured to execute. It is this singular way of estimating events and men that renders it so easy to maintain a position as a celebrity in America. The nation confers its fame as, according to the cynic, people give their gratitude — from a lively sense of favors to come The prospect of taking up these heavy bills on the events of the future, would appal most untried men. But luckily Gen. McClellan, who is a great man for what he is going to do, has before him the reassuring example of Commander Wilkes, who is a great man for what he has only done. There are many other circumstances to soothe and comfort the future hero. Gen. Jackson and Gen. Scott are among the greatest commanders the world has ever seen. The battle of somebody's Bluff and somebody else's Ferry are among the most important actions that were ever fought, as the victors of Waterloo, Juryman, and Solferino are bound to admit. Bunker's Hill was a great victory. All American history is written to prove, not that Amer
Americans (search for this): article 5
t, as the victors of Waterloo, Juryman, and Solferino are bound to admit. Bunker's Hill was a great victory. All American history is written to prove, not that Americans have performed great actions, but that the actions were great because they were performed by Americans. Let him who doubts it refer to some history of modern AmAmericans. Let him who doubts it refer to some history of modern America written by a native, and he will be speedily satisfied that no foreigner would ever willingly undertake the dreary task of wading through the voluminous records, the grand object of which is to render trivialities important and nobodies illustrious. All timorous candidates for celebrity may learn from these chronicles that nfor such. It is not in the dissolution of a system that had become rotten and offensive while yet it preserved the appearance of life — not in the parades which Americans mistake for campaigns, nor which they call great battles; it is in the fiendish spirit in which the contest is carried on, on the part of the North--a spirit wi
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