hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
France (France) 32 0 Browse Search
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) 21 1 Browse Search
Carnot 20 0 Browse Search
Joseph Jackson 18 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 12 0 Browse Search
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Floyd 10 2 Browse Search
Rene Tessier 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 17, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 791 total hits in 398 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Evacuation of the Lower Valley. From Mr. Henry D. Beatt, lately of the Winchester Republican office, we have obtained the following account of the evacuation of Winchester, by Gen. Jackson, and its occupation by the enemy: For several days previous to Tuesday, the 11th, the enemy had been concentrating large forces at Banker's Hill, Smithfield, and Berryville, and everything indicated as advance movement on the part of Gen. Bunks. On Sunday a skirmish came off near Smithfield, between fifteen of Ashby's cavalry and a strong body of the enemy's troops in which the latter lost one man killed and one prisoner. The gallant "Black Horse" Cavalry, after inflicting this damage on the enemy, retired in good order. On Monday, the Yankee pickets were thrown nearer the Confederate cutposts, and as a consequence several of them were affowed the honor of a personal interview with Gen. Jackson. On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith and Bunker's Hill formed a junction abo
n constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended. Large militia reinforcements have been sent forward to Gen. Jackson from the counties of the upper Valley, which, with the noble volunteers under his command, it is hoped, will be sufficient for the protection of the remainder of that, beautiful Valley from the polinting tread of Yankee mercenaries and cut-throats. Not the least agresable information imparied to is by Mr. Beall, is the effect into movements have had upon the spirit of the people. Volunteering is going on with great spirit.--The call of the Governor has aroused the most inkewarm, and entire companies of the militia have surolled themselves for the war in the velunteer service. General Garnett's brigade, almost to a man, have re-enlisted for the war, whilst Col. Burke's brighade have manifested the high spirit of patriotism which might have been expected from true men engaged in a cause so holy.
thfield, and Berryville, and everything indicated as advance movement on the part of Gen. Bunks. On Sunday a skirmish came off near Smithfield, between fifteen of Ashby's cavalry and a strong body of the enemy's troops in which the latter lost one man killed and one prisoner. The gallant "Black Horse" Cavalry, after inflicting th On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith and Bunker's Hill formed a junction about six miles from Winchester, and about two o'clock attacked the pickets of Ashby's cavalry, about four miles from the town. A sharp skirmish ensued, in which the enemy lost several killed and wounded on the Contederate side there was no loss, teen miles from Winchester and two from Stresburg, where he was encamped up to Thursday night. Our informant expresses much admiration for the gallantry of Col. Ashby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended. Large militia reinf
he town and took undisputed possession. They with a cool reception from the loyal people of that beautiful section of the State, and, to the honor of the town, we are pleased to learn, that only two Union flags were displayed, and they by those so bankrupt in character and morals as only to exetion pity for this last exhibition of their treasonable characters. On the afternoon of Wednesday, General Shields's column advanced towards New-town, but were met and driven into Winchester by Col. Ash by's command. On the same day, Gen. Jackson marched to Cedar creek, on the Valley turnpike, sixteen miles from Winchester and two from Stresburg, where he was encamped up to Thursday night. Our informant expresses much admiration for the gallantry of Col. Ashby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended. Large militia reinforcements have been sent forward to Gen. Jackson from the counties
Joseph Jackson (search for this): article 1
e following account of the evacuation of Winchester, by Gen. Jackson, and its occupation by the enemy: For several dayhem were affowed the honor of a personal interview with Gen. Jackson. On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith ania regiment. Whilst this skirmish was progressing, Gen. Jackson's enfire command was summoned from their camp to the exe highest degree. The gallant and Indomitable "Stonswall" Jackson superintended in person the selection of positions for the Winchester by Col. Ash by's command. On the same day, Gen. Jackson marched to Cedar creek, on the Valley turnpike, sixteenby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to Large militia reinforcements have been sent forward to Gen. Jackson from the counties of the upper Valley, which, with the men engaged in a cause so holy. Before evacuating, Gen. Jackson succeeded in resoving all his stores, baggage, &c., so
William F. G. Garnett (search for this): article 1
d to Gen. Jackson from the counties of the upper Valley, which, with the noble volunteers under his command, it is hoped, will be sufficient for the protection of the remainder of that, beautiful Valley from the polinting tread of Yankee mercenaries and cut-throats. Not the least agresable information imparied to is by Mr. Beall, is the effect into movements have had upon the spirit of the people. Volunteering is going on with great spirit.--The call of the Governor has aroused the most inkewarm, and entire companies of the militia have surolled themselves for the war in the velunteer service. General Garnett's brigade, almost to a man, have re-enlisted for the war, whilst Col. Burke's brighade have manifested the high spirit of patriotism which might have been expected from true men engaged in a cause so holy. Before evacuating, Gen. Jackson succeeded in resoving all his stores, baggage, &c., so that not a dollar's worth of public property into the hands of the enemy.
Henry D. Beatt (search for this): article 1
Evacuation of the Lower Valley. From Mr. Henry D. Beatt, lately of the Winchester Republican office, we have obtained the following account of the evacuation of Winchester, by Gen. Jackson, and its occupation by the enemy: For several days previous to Tuesday, the 11th, the enemy had been concentrating large forces at Banker's Hill, Smithfield, and Berryville, and everything indicated as advance movement on the part of Gen. Bunks. On Sunday a skirmish came off near Smithfield, between fifteen of Ashby's cavalry and a strong body of the enemy's troops in which the latter lost one man killed and one prisoner. The gallant "Black Horse" Cavalry, after inflicting this damage on the enemy, retired in good order. On Monday, the Yankee pickets were thrown nearer the Confederate cutposts, and as a consequence several of them were affowed the honor of a personal interview with Gen. Jackson. On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith and Bunker's Hill formed a junction abo
Evacuation of the Lower Valley. From Mr. Henry D. Beatt, lately of the Winchester Republican office, we have obtained the following account of the evacuation of Winchester, by Gen. Jackson, and its occupation by the enemy: For several days previous to Tuesday, the 11th, the enemy had been concentrating large forces at Banker's Hill, Smithfield, and Berryville, and everything indicated as advance movement on the part of Gen. Bunks. On Sunday a skirmish came off near Smithfield, between fifteen of Ashby's cavalry and a strong body of the enemy's troops in which the latter lost one man killed and one prisoner. The gallant "Black Horse" Cavalry, after inflicting this damage on the enemy, retired in good order. On Monday, the Yankee pickets were thrown nearer the Confederate cutposts, and as a consequence several of them were affowed the honor of a personal interview with Gen. Jackson. On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith and Bunker's Hill formed a junction abo
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
but the enemy, ,000 strong, declined to advance to the attack, and night closed with the two armies about two miles apart. On the part of the Confederates there was no sign of trepidation, although outnumbered nearly four to use. But the longings of the gallant Virginians in a conflict with the enemy were not to be pratical. The close of day brought an imperative order from those high in authority for the evacuation of the place, and with regret the army refired in the direction of Strasburg, bivouacking on Tuesday night about miles from Winchester. On Wednesday morning, about 3 o'clock, about 3,000 of the enemy marched into the town and took undisputed possession. They with a cool reception from the loyal people of that beautiful section of the State, and, to the honor of the town, we are pleased to learn, that only two Union flags were displayed, and they by those so bankrupt in character and morals as only to exetion pity for this last exhibition of their treasonabl
Pocomoke City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
ut 3 o'clock, about 3,000 of the enemy marched into the town and took undisputed possession. They with a cool reception from the loyal people of that beautiful section of the State, and, to the honor of the town, we are pleased to learn, that only two Union flags were displayed, and they by those so bankrupt in character and morals as only to exetion pity for this last exhibition of their treasonable characters. On the afternoon of Wednesday, General Shields's column advanced towards New-town, but were met and driven into Winchester by Col. Ash by's command. On the same day, Gen. Jackson marched to Cedar creek, on the Valley turnpike, sixteen miles from Winchester and two from Stresburg, where he was encamped up to Thursday night. Our informant expresses much admiration for the gallantry of Col. Ashby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended. Large militia reinforcements have
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...