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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 17, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
e off near Smithfield, between fifteen of Ashby's cavalry and a strong body of the enemy's troops in which the latter lost one man killed and one prisoner. The gallant "Black Horse" Cavalry, after inflicting this damage on the enemy, retired in good order. On Monday, the Yankee pickets were thrown nearer the Confederate cutposts, and as a consequence several of them were affowed the honor of a personal interview with Gen. Jackson. On Tuesday, at one o'clock, the enemy at smith and Bunker's Hill formed a junction about six miles from Winchester, and about two o'clock attacked the pickets of Ashby's cavalry, about four miles from the town. A sharp skirmish ensued, in which the enemy lost several killed and wounded on the Contederate side there was no loss, except one horse killed. Detachments as skirmishers from Companies F and A, Twenty-first Virginia regiment, were sent our, but the enemy in strong force continning to push of, the skirmishers were compelled to fall back to th
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
n from the loyal people of that beautiful section of the State, and, to the honor of the town, we are pleased to learn, that only two Union flags were displayed, and they by those so bankrupt in character and morals as only to exetion pity for this last exhibition of their treasonable characters. On the afternoon of Wednesday, General Shields's column advanced towards New-town, but were met and driven into Winchester by Col. Ash by's command. On the same day, Gen. Jackson marched to Cedar creek, on the Valley turnpike, sixteen miles from Winchester and two from Stresburg, where he was encamped up to Thursday night. Our informant expresses much admiration for the gallantry of Col. Ashby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended. Large militia reinforcements have been sent forward to Gen. Jackson from the counties of the upper Valley, which, with the noble volunteers under his co
March 14th (search for this): article 1
From North Carolina. the Attach upon Newbern — the town shelled by the Yankees — Panio and Flight of the inhabitants, &c. Goldsboro', N. C., March 14, --Last night about twenty thousand Federals landed with artillery and cavalry near our batteries, a short distance from Newbern, and began skirmishing with their infantry. The enemy's gunboats, about fifty in number, hauled up within gentlemanly distance of our batteries, and opened upon them with eight inch shell. The fight then became general. They drove our men from the battery. Latham's battery was cut all to pleces. Lieutenant-Colonel Haywood is reported killed. He was shot in the forehead. Colonel Campbell is wounds. Several other officers are killed and wounded. Many of our men were also killed, wounded, and made prisoners, but everything is in such litter disorder that nothing definite or certain can be learned. The Federal gunboats ran up to Newbern near the Nouce river brid
he overwhelming odds, numbers retrested in great confusion. This is reliable. [Second Dispatch.] Wilmington, March 16. --Passengers from Newbern and Goldsbore' make conflicting statements of our loss at Newbere. It is impossible to give particulars. All that is known is that Newbern was taken on Friday and the town set on are by the citizens, burning naval stores and cotton. The Yankees put the fire out. Our loss is unknown. The Yankees are reported to have landed 25,000. A prisoner taken, who is now in Kinstrie jail, is reported to have said that Burnside's whole force is ,000, and is distributed at Hatteras, Roan ke Island, and Newbern. Everything is in such confusion at Goldsboro' and below that place that it will take several days to collect any definite particulars. Some say our loss in prisoners does o exceed 500, and 250 to 300 killed and wounded. Many no doubt escaped that were supposed lost. Several arrived here to-day on the cars.
, &c. Goldsboro', N. C., March 14, --Last night about twenty thousand Federals landed with artillery and cavalry near our batteries, a short distance from Newbern, and began skirmishing with their infantry. The enemy's gunboats, about fifty in number, hauled up within gentlemanly distance of our batteries, and opened upon them with eight inch shell. The fight then became general. They drove our men from the battery. Latham's battery was cut all to pleces. Lieutenant-Colonel Haywood is reported killed. He was shot in the forehead. Colonel Campbell is wounds. Several other officers are killed and wounded. Many of our men were also killed, wounded, and made prisoners, but everything is in such litter disorder that nothing definite or certain can be learned. The Federal gunboats ran up to Newbern near the Nouce river bridge and out off the retreat of most of the Confederates. At ten o'clock this i rning about 700 militiamen who had escaped o
March 16th (search for this): article 1
on was dreadful. Women and children were running in every direction to get out of the shower of missiles, which fortunately flew wide of the town and burnt beyonp its limits. We had about 7,000 men in this battle. They fought well until they were flanked right and left by 25,000 Yankees. We repulsed them several times with the bayonet, but, being surrounded by the overwhelming odds, numbers retrested in great confusion. This is reliable. [Second Dispatch.] Wilmington, March 16. --Passengers from Newbern and Goldsbore' make conflicting statements of our loss at Newbere. It is impossible to give particulars. All that is known is that Newbern was taken on Friday and the town set on are by the citizens, burning naval stores and cotton. The Yankees put the fire out. Our loss is unknown. The Yankees are reported to have landed 25,000. A prisoner taken, who is now in Kinstrie jail, is reported to have said that Burnside's whole force is ,000, and is
. We had about 7,000 men in this battle. They fought well until they were flanked right and left by 25,000 Yankees. We repulsed them several times with the bayonet, but, being surrounded by the overwhelming odds, numbers retrested in great confusion. This is reliable. [Second Dispatch.] Wilmington, March 16. --Passengers from Newbern and Goldsbore' make conflicting statements of our loss at Newbere. It is impossible to give particulars. All that is known is that Newbern was taken on Friday and the town set on are by the citizens, burning naval stores and cotton. The Yankees put the fire out. Our loss is unknown. The Yankees are reported to have landed 25,000. A prisoner taken, who is now in Kinstrie jail, is reported to have said that Burnside's whole force is ,000, and is distributed at Hatteras, Roan ke Island, and Newbern. Everything is in such confusion at Goldsboro' and below that place that it will take several days to collect any d
Charles Campbell (search for this): article 1
ousand Federals landed with artillery and cavalry near our batteries, a short distance from Newbern, and began skirmishing with their infantry. The enemy's gunboats, about fifty in number, hauled up within gentlemanly distance of our batteries, and opened upon them with eight inch shell. The fight then became general. They drove our men from the battery. Latham's battery was cut all to pleces. Lieutenant-Colonel Haywood is reported killed. He was shot in the forehead. Colonel Campbell is wounds. Several other officers are killed and wounded. Many of our men were also killed, wounded, and made prisoners, but everything is in such litter disorder that nothing definite or certain can be learned. The Federal gunboats ran up to Newbern near the Nouce river bridge and out off the retreat of most of the Confederates. At ten o'clock this i rning about 700 militiamen who had escaped over the bridge before the Yankee gunboats got there came into Newbern at a do
he overwhelming odds, numbers retrested in great confusion. This is reliable. [Second Dispatch.] Wilmington, March 16. --Passengers from Newbern and Goldsbore' make conflicting statements of our loss at Newbere. It is impossible to give particulars. All that is known is that Newbern was taken on Friday and the town set on are by the citizens, burning naval stores and cotton. The Yankees put the fire out. Our loss is unknown. The Yankees are reported to have landed 25,000. A prisoner taken, who is now in Kinstrie jail, is reported to have said that Burnside's whole force is ,000, and is distributed at Hatteras, Roan ke Island, and Newbern. Everything is in such confusion at Goldsboro' and below that place that it will take several days to collect any definite particulars. Some say our loss in prisoners does o exceed 500, and 250 to 300 killed and wounded. Many no doubt escaped that were supposed lost. Several arrived here to-day on the cars.
Georges R. Latham (search for this): article 1
ed by the Yankees — Panio and Flight of the inhabitants, &c. Goldsboro', N. C., March 14, --Last night about twenty thousand Federals landed with artillery and cavalry near our batteries, a short distance from Newbern, and began skirmishing with their infantry. The enemy's gunboats, about fifty in number, hauled up within gentlemanly distance of our batteries, and opened upon them with eight inch shell. The fight then became general. They drove our men from the battery. Latham's battery was cut all to pleces. Lieutenant-Colonel Haywood is reported killed. He was shot in the forehead. Colonel Campbell is wounds. Several other officers are killed and wounded. Many of our men were also killed, wounded, and made prisoners, but everything is in such litter disorder that nothing definite or certain can be learned. The Federal gunboats ran up to Newbern near the Nouce river bridge and out off the retreat of most of the Confederates. At ten o'cl
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