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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 17, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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a successful attack by the enemy. It med entirely unnecessary, as from their "mobility," they are perhaps as safe in place as another. whole city is in a state of excitement a fews of the exploits of the Merrimac, has just been received. It is consid quite a nice thing, and fortunately hap just at the right time. weather is exceedingly unpleasant, and it is not so cold as in Virginia, it is, if a thing be possible, very much more and is always damper. Upon rivers there is an almost constant fog. shop Wilmer is shortly expected, and Mr. of Christ Church, gave notice that soon confirmation would be administered the Bishop. martial law is enforced, and without full or permits one advances slowly. upon every approach to the city, with trouble or tered, with greater is left — as at Nashville, where the were beginning to fortify, when it was so I fear this wisely stringent sure has been too long neglected, and the commated all they desure. C *****
le evidence that is with us, I believe they are firmly re have to-day seen an old man of per ghty years, with grand-children now having gun in hand and expressing mention to be in the approaching action be found amongst others than " Re Bragg has the esteam of all classes, confidence seems to be placed in his an officer. Many have told me, when the Yankees could take the city, that Bragg here it would be imposed he is easily within reach, should be needed, ago, Mobile will flouBragg here it would be imposed he is easily within reach, should be needed, ago, Mobile will flour green bay tree. There is much that I tell you which would be of general but from prudential reasons am just seen some gentlemen from Pen who are moving their "contrabands," a successful attack by the enemy. It med entirely unnecessary, as from their "mobility," they are perhaps as safe in place as another. whole city is in a state of excitement a fews of the exploits of the Merrimac, has just been received. It is consid quite a nice thing, and fortunately hap just at
March 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
From Mobile. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch] Mobile, Ala., March 11, 1862. "fam setis terris dirat eighe wendinis misit pater." ch a reason as is said to have been un to say, such raise as have a place only money of antidelavians, such incongress as may be supposed incidental to a on the Alabama river — at an average of a few hundred yards, now swollen many miles — suddenly finding one's self distant from its shore, lying "high and a cotton field, with no visible means off, and with recollections of hav heard at the last meal that provisions exhausted, such views as of negroes, on suddenly flooded, remaining for trees, affording amusing illustrations primitive habits, when, uncivilized, perilla like, roamed through the forests as beasts;--these it has been my to have ever present from Montgom Mobile, now arrived safely, feeling too my the sufferings of a "stranger in a land. " (It is my first, and shall I not last, visit to the "sunny South?"
of many, that, with the divine, they laim-- "Awike, my coul, stretch every nerve, And press with vigor on" s in this fair land, figuratively as that of the "Magnolla and Honey "(few, very few of which I have seen, announcing in moss, now for the first time to account in the manufacture of there are those who have patiently, gently awaited a "draft." Worshippers shrine of Mammon, by their course endorsing A. L, when he said "all right," "sobody was hurt," through the of Gov. Shorter who has called out "may now find active employment and, assuming the required patriotism, with enthusiasm, exclaim, "Dules at pre patris mori" you are doubtless aware, all places of in the city are closed at three P. M., all who can walk devote the afternoon killing. Varied are their equipments, no having in every respect the same. Many ly a belt, others with a gun without a sin some with perhaps only a cart Yet their whole souls are enlisted their improvement must be rapid
Alabama river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Mobile. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch] Mobile, Ala., March 11, 1862. "fam setis terris dirat eighe wendinis misit pater." ch a reason as is said to have been un to say, such raise as have a place only money of antidelavians, such incongress as may be supposed incidental to a on the Alabama river — at an average of a few hundred yards, now swollen many miles — suddenly finding one's self distant from its shore, lying "high and a cotton field, with no visible means off, and with recollections of hav heard at the last meal that provisions exhausted, such views as of negroes, on suddenly flooded, remaining for trees, affording amusing illustrations primitive habits, when, uncivilized, perilla like, roamed through the forests as beasts;--these it has been my to have ever present from Montgom Mobile, now arrived safely, feeling too my the sufferings of a "stranger in a land. " (It is my first, and shall I not last, visit to the "sunny South?"
Robert E. Lee (search for this): article 1
Gen. Lee. The appointment of Gen. Lee Commander-in-Chief is one which we hail with great satisfaction. In the old army he was justly regarded as second only toGen. Lee Commander-in-Chief is one which we hail with great satisfaction. In the old army he was justly regarded as second only to Gen. Scott, and we believe that was the opinion of the Lieutenant General himself. As an engineer officer, he has confessedly no superior, and in every respect, we The same objection that was made to Gen. Washington has been alleged against Gen. Lee--too much caution; but it proved an advantage in the first Revolution, and mayns General in the Federal ranks in Buell, and he has been the most sucessful. Gen. Lee is a man of great modesty of character, but extraordinary energy, courage, andew, except by their results, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers whicr, and the purity, disinterestedness and dignity of his life, should ensure to Gen. Lee the entire confidence of the Army and the People of the South. That the c
econd only to Gen. Scott, and we believe that was the opinion of the Lieutenant General himself. As an engineer officer, he has confessedly no superior, and in every respect, we are inclined to think, is the best selection that could have been made. The same objection that was made to Gen. Washington has been alleged against Gen. Lee--too much caution; but it proved an advantage in the first Revolution, and may be equally so in the second. The most cautions General in the Federal ranks in Buell, and he has been the most sucessful. Gen. Lee is a man of great modesty of character, but extraordinary energy, courage, and self-possession. In the early organization of our defences in. Virginia, he scarcely gave sleep to his eyes; yet so noiselessly and mostanatiously were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers which, up to the p
uties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers which, up to the present moment, have confined the enemy to Alexandria and Newport News, have held back his invading masses, and made his stereotyped cry of "On to Richmond" the laughing stock of the world. Subsequently ordered to South Carolina, which was then menaced by the enemy, under Sherman and Dupont, who, by a vigorous movement upon the capture of Port Royal, might easily have captured Charleston, he has left that country in such a state of defence that Charleston is considered almost impregnable, and even Savannah, which had become as defenceless as Nashville, was put in a position to make a stout, and in all probability a successful, resistance to the foe. In addition to the fortifications, a large army has been organized and disciplined, and stationed at such points as are necessary
Washington (search for this): article 1
Gen. Lee. The appointment of Gen. Lee Commander-in-Chief is one which we hail with great satisfaction. In the old army he was justly regarded as second only to Gen. Scott, and we believe that was the opinion of the Lieutenant General himself. As an engineer officer, he has confessedly no superior, and in every respect, we are inclined to think, is the best selection that could have been made. The same objection that was made to Gen. Washington has been alleged against Gen. Lee--too much caution; but it proved an advantage in the first Revolution, and may be equally so in the second. The most cautions General in the Federal ranks in Buell, and he has been the most sucessful. Gen. Lee is a man of great modesty of character, but extraordinary energy, courage, and self-possession. In the early organization of our defences in. Virginia, he scarcely gave sleep to his eyes; yet so noiselessly and mostanatiously were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results
were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers which, up to the present moment, have confined the enemy to Alexandria and Newport News, have held back his invading masses, and made his stereotyped cry of "On to Richmond" the laughing stock of the world. Subsequently ordered to South Carolina, which was then menaced by the enemy, under Sherman and Dupont, who, by a vigorous movement upon the capture of Port Royal, might easily have captured Charleston, he has left that country in such a state of defence that Charleston is considered almost impregnable, and even Savannah, which had become as defenceless as Nashville, was put in a position to make a stout, and in all probability a successful, resistance to the foe. In addition to the fortifications, a large army has been organized and disciplined, and stationed at such points as ar
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