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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 17, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Edward Scott (search for this): article 1
Gen. Lee. The appointment of Gen. Lee Commander-in-Chief is one which we hail with great satisfaction. In the old army he was justly regarded as second only to Gen. Scott, and we believe that was the opinion of the Lieutenant General himself. As an engineer officer, he has confessedly no superior, and in every respect, we are inclined to think, is the best selection that could have been made. The same objection that was made to Gen. Washington has been alleged against Gen. Lee--too much caution; but it proved an advantage in the first Revolution, and may be equally so in the second. The most cautions General in the Federal ranks in Buell, and he has been the most sucessful. Gen. Lee is a man of great modesty of character, but extraordinary energy, courage, and self-possession. In the early organization of our defences in. Virginia, he scarcely gave sleep to his eyes; yet so noiselessly and mostanatiously were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results,
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
sleep to his eyes; yet so noiselessly and mostanatiously were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers which, up to the present moment, have confined the enemy to Alexandria and Newport News, have held back his invading masses, and made his stereotyped cry of "On to Richmond" the laughing stock of the world. Subsequently ordered to South Carolina, which was then menaced by the enemy, under Sherman and Dupont, who, by a vigorous movement upon the capture of Port Royal, might easily have captured Charleston, he has left that country in such a state of defence that Charleston is considered almost impregnable, and even Savannah, which had become as defenceless as Nashville, was put in a position to make a stout, and in all probability a successful, resistance to the foe. In addition to the fortifications, a large army has been organi
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
s, what had been accomplished. The public never saw Gen. Lee, but they saw the fact that lines of defences arose round their frontiers which, up to the present moment, have confined the enemy to Alexandria and Newport News, have held back his invading masses, and made his stereotyped cry of "On to Richmond" the laughing stock of the world. Subsequently ordered to South Carolina, which was then menaced by the enemy, under Sherman and Dupont, who, by a vigorous movement upon the capture of Port Royal, might easily have captured Charleston, he has left that country in such a state of defence that Charleston is considered almost impregnable, and even Savannah, which had become as defenceless as Nashville, was put in a position to make a stout, and in all probability a successful, resistance to the foe. In addition to the fortifications, a large army has been organized and disciplined, and stationed at such points as are necessary for the efficient defence of the State. The whole militar
Robert Johnson (search for this): article 1
This popular institution continues to increase and multiply in point of population, and bids fair soon to rival a number of similar places of deposit in the number of its inmates. The quarters provided for the parties arrested by the military authorities are very comfortable, and no doubt many of them fare better in the hands of the Government than they would if left to their own guidance and control. The military police in going their rounds on Saturday night found two soldiers, named Robert Johnson and Patrick Kennedy, in Tyler's alley, near Hughes's Row, on 17th street, engaged in the rather strange diversion of pulling down a wooden shanty, inhabited by a man and his wife. On being escoated and asked to explain the nature of the proceeding, they said that one of their friends had been stabbed and killed in the house, and they were determined, by pulling down the house, to prevent the possibility of damage to any one else. They had previously assured the inmates that they design
George Frost (search for this): article 1
y were determined, by pulling down the house, to prevent the possibility of damage to any one else. They had previously assured the inmates that they designed no harm to them. When told they must stop, (they had already broken down one side of the house and were in the act of removing some of the rafters,) they grew indignant, and one of them, Patrick Kennedy, drew a five-shooler and threatened instant annihilation to any one who should interfere. Of course they were captured, though offering all the resistance they could to the proceeding. Besides a number of soldiers arrested on Saturday for offences growing out of a too free indulgence in liquor, two citizens, named Geo. Frost and Jno. Hancock, were arrested on suspicion of disloyalty. It is understood that they had refused to take the cath of allegiance, which was regarded. vation of hostility to the Confed member of persons, to whom suspicion attacked, were required on Saturday to remove them or take the consequences.
William H. Tyler (search for this): article 1
to increase and multiply in point of population, and bids fair soon to rival a number of similar places of deposit in the number of its inmates. The quarters provided for the parties arrested by the military authorities are very comfortable, and no doubt many of them fare better in the hands of the Government than they would if left to their own guidance and control. The military police in going their rounds on Saturday night found two soldiers, named Robert Johnson and Patrick Kennedy, in Tyler's alley, near Hughes's Row, on 17th street, engaged in the rather strange diversion of pulling down a wooden shanty, inhabited by a man and his wife. On being escoated and asked to explain the nature of the proceeding, they said that one of their friends had been stabbed and killed in the house, and they were determined, by pulling down the house, to prevent the possibility of damage to any one else. They had previously assured the inmates that they designed no harm to them. When told the
Patrick Kennedy (search for this): article 1
rtable, and no doubt many of them fare better in the hands of the Government than they would if left to their own guidance and control. The military police in going their rounds on Saturday night found two soldiers, named Robert Johnson and Patrick Kennedy, in Tyler's alley, near Hughes's Row, on 17th street, engaged in the rather strange diversion of pulling down a wooden shanty, inhabited by a man and his wife. On being escoated and asked to explain the nature of the proceeding, they said thad previously assured the inmates that they designed no harm to them. When told they must stop, (they had already broken down one side of the house and were in the act of removing some of the rafters,) they grew indignant, and one of them, Patrick Kennedy, drew a five-shooler and threatened instant annihilation to any one who should interfere. Of course they were captured, though offering all the resistance they could to the proceeding. Besides a number of soldiers arrested on Saturday
Jonathan Hancock (search for this): article 1
y were determined, by pulling down the house, to prevent the possibility of damage to any one else. They had previously assured the inmates that they designed no harm to them. When told they must stop, (they had already broken down one side of the house and were in the act of removing some of the rafters,) they grew indignant, and one of them, Patrick Kennedy, drew a five-shooler and threatened instant annihilation to any one who should interfere. Of course they were captured, though offering all the resistance they could to the proceeding. Besides a number of soldiers arrested on Saturday for offences growing out of a too free indulgence in liquor, two citizens, named Geo. Frost and Jno. Hancock, were arrested on suspicion of disloyalty. It is understood that they had refused to take the cath of allegiance, which was regarded. vation of hostility to the Confed member of persons, to whom suspicion attacked, were required on Saturday to remove them or take the consequences.
rd to Gen. Jackson from the counties of the upper Valley, which, with the noble volunteers under his command, it is hoped, will be sufficient for the protection of the remainder of that, beautiful Valley from the polinting tread of Yankee mercenaries and cut-throats. Not the least agresable information imparied to is by Mr. Beall, is the effect into movements have had upon the spirit of the people. Volunteering is going on with great spirit.--The call of the Governor has aroused the most inkewarm, and entire companies of the militia have surolled themselves for the war in the velunteer service. General Garnett's brigade, almost to a man, have re-enlisted for the war, whilst Col. Burke's brighade have manifested the high spirit of patriotism which might have been expected from true men engaged in a cause so holy. Before evacuating, Gen. Jackson succeeded in resoving all his stores, baggage, &c., so that not a dollar's worth of public property into the hands of the enemy.
hester. On Wednesday morning, about 3 o'clock, about 3,000 of the enemy marched into the town and took undisputed possession. They with a cool reception from the loyal people of that beautiful section of the State, and, to the honor of the town, we are pleased to learn, that only two Union flags were displayed, and they by those so bankrupt in character and morals as only to exetion pity for this last exhibition of their treasonable characters. On the afternoon of Wednesday, General Shields's column advanced towards New-town, but were met and driven into Winchester by Col. Ash by's command. On the same day, Gen. Jackson marched to Cedar creek, on the Valley turnpike, sixteen miles from Winchester and two from Stresburg, where he was encamped up to Thursday night. Our informant expresses much admiration for the gallantry of Col. Ashby. That officer has been constantly in the advance of Gen. Jackson's forces, and has displayed skill and courage highly to be commended.
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