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was frequently associated with Miss Stephens Her retirement from the stage, consequent on her marriage with Mr. Bradshaw, occurred so long since that to modern amateurs of music she will seem to belong to a remote past, and to exist only in honorable tradition. Thirteen years have elapsed since the death of Mr. Bradshaw, and she has left one child, a daughter, who is married to Mr. Langley, formerly of the Second Guards.--Mrs. Bradshaw was the eldest sister of Mrs. Charles Kean. On the 14th, Mrs Hudson, the wife of Mr. Hudson, a shopkeepet at Burythorpe, was at Mr. Waton's farm, at Birsdall, near Malton, where a corn-threshing machine was in use. Mrs. Hudson attempted to step over the "tumbling shaft," which revolves rapidly, and has a connection in the centre which presents sharp angles, and are very likely to catch and retain hold of a dress if brought in proximity. It is thought Mrs. Hudson's dress was caught in this way, and was instantaneously wrapped several times round t
he had come out to meet her lover. The gendarms are reported to have murdered the girl and robbed her; afterwards they captured the girls lover, and accused him of the murder. As they dragged him through the forest they met a poacher, whom they arrested. He had seen the crime committed and denounced them, and the money was found upon them, with other proof of their guilt. Mrs. Bradshaw, the once eminent vocalist, known to the eider generation of playgoers as Miss. M. Tree, died on the 17th. In the old days of English ballad-opera she stood in the highest rank of her profession, and in the musical adaptations of Shakspeare's plays, which were common many years ago, she was frequently associated with Miss Stephens Her retirement from the stage, consequent on her marriage with Mr. Bradshaw, occurred so long since that to modern amateurs of music she will seem to belong to a remote past, and to exist only in honorable tradition. Thirteen years have elapsed since the death of Mr.
effect: "The captain of the Sumtes has been arrested at Tangler, at the instance of the American Consul at Gibraltar and of the commander of the Tuscarora, who sent to Tangter for that purpose" This news may be received with distrust. The proceedings in the British Partiament, briefly noticed by telegraph, have reached us more in detall. We copy an account of the episode in the House of Commons on the 25th of February: Lord Palmerston stated that, during the debate on the 21st ultimo, the Secretary for Ireland, Sir Robert Peel, had used expressions which "the O'Donoghue" had considered personally offensive and insuiting to himself. The O'Donoghue took no notices of the expressions at the time, but he (Palmerston) was given to understand that results out of the House might ensue. As this would involve a breach of privilege, he wrote a letter to Sir Robert Peel, warning him of the impending trouble, and cautioning him against making himself a party to the breach of pr
eel, had used expressions which "the O'Donoghue" had considered personally offensive and insuiting to himself. The O'Donoghue took no notices of the expressions at the time, but he (Palmerston) was given to understand that results out of the House might ensue. As this would involve a breach of privilege, he wrote a letter to Sir Robert Peel, warning him of the impending trouble, and cautioning him against making himself a party to the breach of privilege. In the course of Saturday, the 22d, communications took place which led to a request that Sir Robert Peel-would name a friend, At his (Palmerston's) request he was that friend, but not, of course, with the design of arranging a hostile meeting. He was subesquently called upon by Major Gavin, the friend of the O'Donoghue, and explained to that gentleman that a breach of the privileges of the House could not be permitted, and that it was his intention to state the facts to the House and leave the question in its hands. The
f international maritime law, as it concerns belligerents and nentials, is undefined, unsatisfactory, and calls for the early attention of her Majesty's Government. France. The discussion on the address war resumed in the Senate on the 24th ultimo, M Troplong exhorted the Senators to preserve a conciliatory and moderate tone in the debates. M. de Boissy regretted that France had assisted England in revenging herself on the Chinese. He was of opinion that the money expended in the Crimr change. (Loud and prolonged applause) Against the insinuations that have been thrown out against myself personally, I have determined to answer them only by contempt." About two thousand workmen preceeded to the Place de la Bastille on the 24th, but, when attempting to march round the Column of July, were dispersed by the police. There was no resistance or outcry, and the mensought consolation in the wine shogs. The French Government had authorized the General Maritime Company to p
et introduced the Navy estimates and entered at length into the position of naval affairs. After some debate a vote of seventy-six thousand men and the required sum for their wages and maintenance was agreed to. In the House of Lords, on the 25th, the Karl of Derby gave notice that he should on Thursday put a question to the Secretary of Foreign Affairs with regard to a proclamation of a most extraordinary character, which had been published in the Neapolitan papers. The proclamation sitsrevive French animosity towards England, when the policy of the Emperor tended, on the contrary, to appease such feelings. M. M. Shayer and Charles Dupin spoke in favor of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The debate was adjourned. On the 25th the discussion was continued. Prince Napoleon protested against the expressions used by M. de Boissy. He said:--"In the Senate the standard of the younger branch has been raised in opposition to that of the older branch. I protested last year a
February 25th (search for this): article 6
Affairs in Europe. The only allusion we have foundin the late European news to the arrest of Captain Semmes, of the Sumter, is a brief telegram from Madrid, dated February 25th, to this effect: "The captain of the Sumtes has been arrested at Tangler, at the instance of the American Consul at Gibraltar and of the commander of the Tuscarora, who sent to Tangter for that purpose" This news may be received with distrust. The proceedings in the British Partiament, briefly noticed by telegraph, have reached us more in detall. We copy an account of the episode in the House of Commons on the 25th of February: Lord Palmerston stated that, during the debate on the 21st ultimo, the Secretary for Ireland, Sir Robert Peel, had used expressions which "the O'Donoghue" had considered personally offensive and insuiting to himself. The O'Donoghue took no notices of the expressions at the time, but he (Palmerston) was given to understand that results out of the House might ensue.
exile, shall remember it all the better now when my duties attach me to the Emperor and to his son, and that those duties agree with a devotion of ancient date, and an affection which will never change. (Loud and prolonged applause) Against the insinuations that have been thrown out against myself personally, I have determined to answer them only by contempt." About two thousand workmen preceeded to the Place de la Bastille on the 24th, but, when attempting to march round the Column of July, were dispersed by the police. There was no resistance or outcry, and the mensought consolation in the wine shogs. The French Government had authorized the General Maritime Company to purchase steamers in England for the line between France and Mexico, about to be established. The Moniteu, with Prince Napoleon's first speech, and an account of the tumultuous actions which it produced, had been posted on the walls of Paris, and extensively and eagerly read by the working classes.
May 6th, 1771 AD (search for this): article 6
njoy perfect health, and to be entirely given to agriculture. Thirty-four peasants have been sent over to him, who are engaged in plonghing a large tract of land along the coast; and if this continues the Island of Caprera will be soon completely transformed. The General constantly receives addresses and presents from his friends. He passes his evenings in reading the journals. The Vlenna journals announce the death in that city of aliterary veteran, ignatlus Casteill, born on the 6th of May, 1771, and consequently, 91 years of age. He wrote the text of the "Swiss family," set to music by Schlosser, and performed in Paris with French words in 1825. He was also the translator of numerous operatic and dramatic places.--Casteill has written his own epitaph, as follows: "Here lies a man who was ever devoted to art and honor. He was not of much importance when alive, and low he is nothing at all." He had a mania for collecting snuffboxes, and has left not fewer than 1,800.
along the coast; and if this continues the Island of Caprera will be soon completely transformed. The General constantly receives addresses and presents from his friends. He passes his evenings in reading the journals. The Vlenna journals announce the death in that city of aliterary veteran, ignatlus Casteill, born on the 6th of May, 1771, and consequently, 91 years of age. He wrote the text of the "Swiss family," set to music by Schlosser, and performed in Paris with French words in 1825. He was also the translator of numerous operatic and dramatic places.--Casteill has written his own epitaph, as follows: "Here lies a man who was ever devoted to art and honor. He was not of much importance when alive, and low he is nothing at all." He had a mania for collecting snuffboxes, and has left not fewer than 1,800. The Journal du Cher states that a painful accident occurred two nights since at the theatre of Bourges, during the performance of the fairy opera of the Amoure du
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