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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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California --Capt. Patrick, of South Carolina, Major Means, and Mr. J. M. Steward, of Virginia, arrived in New Orleans on the 8th inst., from California. The Delta says: They informed us that the most intense feeling of sympathy for the Confederacy, and of opposition to the Northern despotism, exists among the Southerners residing in California. This feeling has been intensified by the persecution to which they are subjected. Many have been arrested, and all are closely watched. Were it not for the vigilant system of espionage which is maintained by the authorities, there would be a general exodus of Southerners from the country. It is gratifying to know that the spirit of opposition to the North and of sympathy for the South is general among the Southerners. There are no divisions — all, whether Marylanders, Virginians, Kentuckians Missourians, or citizens of the Cotton States, are united in sentiment. Nothing could keep any of them to California but the extreme di
Something too good to be told. --The Atlanta (Ga.) Confederacy, of the 11th instant, has the following mysterious paragraph: We are in possession of some important information, which we will not divulge for a day or two. It gives us hope for the future.--We feel more encouraged at it than anything that has happened lately.
The Yankees at port Royal. The Athens (Ga.) Banner Says: A gentleman in the Confederate service at Yorktown, Va., has sent to his brother in this place a copy of the New York Tribune, of the 19th ult., from which we learn much of the movements and intentions of the United States Government in reference to the property of Southern men which may fall into their hands. It will be remembered that about the time Port Royal was captured, the Yankee General, Sherman, issued a proclamation to the people of South Carolina, telling them that he came among them as a friend and protector, and not as an enemy that he had, in former years, partaken of their hospitality, and that their private property and rights would be religiously respected, &c., just as Buell has done at Nashville. The Tribune contains lengthy official report to the United States Secretary of the Treasury, S. P. Chase, from a man named Edward L. Pierce, who was appointed by the Yankee Secretary to go to Port Royal
upied since the commencement of the session, though most of the bills passed or forwarded do not possess sufficient general interest to notice them in detail. Adjournment of the House. A resolution was submitted f ing Friday next, the 21st inst., as the day of adjournment. This was amended so as to substitute Friday the 28th, for Friday, the 21st, and the amendment was adopted. Pending quite an animated discussion on the resolution as amended, the House adjourned. [Note.--In our21st, and the amendment was adopted. Pending quite an animated discussion on the resolution as amended, the House adjourned. [Note.--In our legislative proceedings yesterday an error occurred in reporting some remarks of Mr. Fleming, on the bill releasing certain corporations and sheriffs from penalties incurred by issuing notes as currency contrary to law. Mr. Fleming said, that if these corporations and sheriffs were released from penalties for violation of law, he hoped the bill would be amended so as to include other persons also. He could see no justice in relieving these corporations, whilst, individuals were left to su
ircumstances would permit. I am pleased to say few complaints were either made or heard, Missouri having been admitted as an equal member of the Confederate States, and having my command much augmented by recruits, I was enabled to raise and equip about 4,000 men for the Confederate service. A brigade of these, consisting of two regiments of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, and two light batteries of artillery, have been tendered the Confederate Government. About the latter part of January, my scouts reported that the enemy were concentrating in force at Rolla, and shortly thereafter they occupied Lebanon. Believing that this movement could be for no other purpose than to attack me, and knowing that my command was inadequate for such successful resistance as the interests of my army and the cause demanded, I appealed to the commanders' of the confederate troops in Arkansas to come to my assistance. This, from correspondence, I was led confidently to expect, and, relying upo
February 25th (search for this): article 20
Gen. Price's retreat from Springfield. The following is the substance of General Sterling Price's official report of his retreat from Springfield, (dated February 25,) addressed to Gov. Jackson, of Missouri. It furnishes a sufficient answer to the Federal accounts, and affords additional evidence of the mendacity of the Federal Generals: A bout the latter part of December, I left my camp on Sac river, St. Clair county, fell back, and took up my quarters at Springfield for the purpose of being within reach of supplies, protecting that portion of the State from home guard depredations and Federal invasion, as well as to secure a most valuable point for military movement At Springfield, I received from Grand Glaze considerable supplies of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and having built huts, our soldiers were as comfortable as circumstances would permit. I am pleased to say few complaints were either made or heard, Missouri having been admitted as an equal member of th
March 19th (search for this): article 16
House of Representatives. Wednesday, March 19. House met at 18 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Doggett. The Journal of yesterday was read and approved. Hon. John V. Wright appeared and took the oath of office. A message was received from the Senate informing the House that the Senate had disagreed to the 1st, 2d, and 3d amendments of the House to the Senate bill regulating the pay of members of Congress, and that the Senate concurred in the 4th and 5th amendments of the House. Mr. Bonham moved for a suspension of the rule for the call of the States, with a view to take up the bill as it came from the Senate; and also moved that the House recede from its amendment, striking out $3,000 in the Senate bill, and inserting $2,500 in lieu thereof. He thought it would be graceful in the House at once to concur with the Senate. He was sure if this Congress adopted vigorous measures for the prosecution of the war, the people would not complain that the
June 15th (search for this): article 6
Runaway in Jail. --Was committed to the Jail of the county of Hanover, on the 15th day of June last as a runaway, a Negro Woman, calling herself Milly, and says she is the property of Peter Pulliam, of the city of Richmond, Va. The said Negro is of a dark complexion, and is about four, feet ten inches high, and about 60 years of age, and has a weil on the right shoulder — a scar on same shoulder. The said Negro had on when committed an old brown Calico dress. The owner of the said Negro is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take her away, else she will be dealt with as the law direct. C. S. Chisholme, Acting Jailor of Hanover county, Va. ja 12-- aw6w
July 18th (search for this): article 1
. France put 100,000 men on foot, though bound for only 24,000. The Diet of Ratisbon put 60,000 troops of the Empire at the disposal of Austria. Frederick still preserved the ascendant. Breaking into Bohemia in March, 1757, he defeated the Austrians in a great battle at Prague, and shut up 40,000 of their best troops in the town, Marshal Daun advanced with 60,000 men to relieve them. Frederick advanced with less than twenty thousand, attacked them in a strong position at olin on the 18th July, and for the first time in his life, met with a bloody defeat — a retreat out of Bohemia became unavoidable. His army sustained severe losses in effecting it; and the King confessed in his private correspondence that nothing remained to him but an honorable death. Disasters accumulated on every side. The English and Hanoverian army capitulated at Closter seven, and left the French army 60,000 strong to follow the Prussians. The French, and troops of the Emperor under Richelieu, menaced
September (search for this): article 5
Runaway in Jail. --Was committed to the Jail of the county of Hanover, on the day of September last, as a runaway, a Negro Boy, calling himself Levi Bruington, who claims to be free. The said Negro is of a dark complexion, and is about 5 feet 8 inches high, and is about 18 years of age, has a near on right wrist and leg. The said Negro had on when committed a pair of brown Jeans pants and shirt, and a military cap, and is supposed to have escaped from some military company. The owner of said Negro is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, else be will be dealt with as the law directs. C. S. Chisholme, Acting Jailor of Hanover county, Va. ja 17-- aw6w
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