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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 604 total hits in 281 results.

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W. Colton (search for this): article 1
Fifty Dollars Reward will be paid for the arrest and delivery to me of my negro man Abram, if taken outside the city or county, and $25 if within. He will doubtless try to go to Fredericksburg on the railroad track. He is 29 years old; black heavy build; 5 feet 8 or 10 inches high; had on light-colored fall clothes; heavy brogans. He was brought from King George county, Va., on Monday last. W. Colton, mh 15--3t* Monument Hotel.
King George county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Fifty Dollars Reward will be paid for the arrest and delivery to me of my negro man Abram, if taken outside the city or county, and $25 if within. He will doubtless try to go to Fredericksburg on the railroad track. He is 29 years old; black heavy build; 5 feet 8 or 10 inches high; had on light-colored fall clothes; heavy brogans. He was brought from King George county, Va., on Monday last. W. Colton, mh 15--3t* Monument Hotel.
July 18th (search for this): article 1
. France put 100,000 men on foot, though bound for only 24,000. The Diet of Ratisbon put 60,000 troops of the Empire at the disposal of Austria. Frederick still preserved the ascendant. Breaking into Bohemia in March, 1757, he defeated the Austrians in a great battle at Prague, and shut up 40,000 of their best troops in the town, Marshal Daun advanced with 60,000 men to relieve them. Frederick advanced with less than twenty thousand, attacked them in a strong position at olin on the 18th July, and for the first time in his life, met with a bloody defeat — a retreat out of Bohemia became unavoidable. His army sustained severe losses in effecting it; and the King confessed in his private correspondence that nothing remained to him but an honorable death. Disasters accumulated on every side. The English and Hanoverian army capitulated at Closter seven, and left the French army 60,000 strong to follow the Prussians. The French, and troops of the Emperor under Richelieu, menaced
Richelieu (search for this): article 1
on the 18th July, and for the first time in his life, met with a bloody defeat — a retreat out of Bohemia became unavoidable. His army sustained severe losses in effecting it; and the King confessed in his private correspondence that nothing remained to him but an honorable death. Disasters accumulated on every side. The English and Hanoverian army capitulated at Closter seven, and left the French army 60,000 strong to follow the Prussians. The French, and troops of the Emperor under Richelieu, menaced Magdeburg, where the Royal family of Prussia had taken refuge. The Russians, 70,000 strong, were making serious progress on the side of Poland, defeating the Prussians opposed to them. The army of the Empire, 40,000 strong, was moving against him. Four huge armies, each stronger than his own, were advancing to crush him — he could not collect 30,000 men round his banners. At this time he carried a sure poison always with him, determined not to fall alive into the hands of his e
omposed of flat plains, unprotected by great rivers, and surrounded on the South, East, and North by its foes, the contest seemed utterly desperate, with no hope of escape for Prussia." Frederick began the contest by a bold stroke, which demonstrated the vigor of his determination and the strength of his understanding. He carried the war into the enemy's country, suddenly entered Saxony, made, himself master of Dresden, shut the forces of Saxony up in the entrenched camp at Pirna. Marshal Brown advanced with 60,000 men to relieve them. Frederick met and totally defeated him at Lowositz. At Pirna, after vain efforts to escape, 14,000 laid down their arms; the whole of Saxony submitted, and Frederick; throughout the whole war, thenceforward turned its entire resources to his own support. The allies made desperate efforts to regain the advantages they had lost. France put 100,000 men on foot, though bound for only 24,000. The Diet of Ratisbon put 60,000 troops of the Empire a
te. In the depth of winter he attacked, at Leuthen, Daun and Lorrain, who had 60,000 men, defeated them with the loss of 50,000 men, eighteen thousand of whom were prisoners. But it was Frederick's destiny to be ever surrounded with difficulties. from the immense numerical advantages of his enemies and the ill success of the Lieutenants to whom his subordinate armies were entrusted. During his operations in the South, the Russians had made alarming progress in the Northeast. The feeble Russian forces who opposed them were well nigh swallowed up. Frederick led the flower of his army from Olmutz, in Moravia; crossed all Silesia and Prussia, encountered the sturdy Russians at Zorndorf, and defeated them with a loss of 1 ,000--a victory dearly bought, with the loss of 10,000 of his own best soldiers.--During the King's absence, Prince Henry, who had been left with sixteen thousand men to keep atin in check, was nearly overwhelmed — the Austrians numbering fifty thousand men, under th
ate. Austria, Russia, France, Sweden, and Saxony, united in alliance to partition the Prussian territories. These allies had ninety millions of men in their dominions, and with ease could bring four hundred thousand to the field. Prussia had only six millions, who were strained to the utmost to array an army of one hundred and twenty thousand. Even with the aid of England and Hanover, not more than fifty thousand auxiliaries could be relied on. Prussia had neither strong fortresses like Flanders, nor mountain chains like Spain, nor a frontier stream like France. Its territory open on every side, composed of flat plains, unprotected by great rivers, and surrounded on the South, East, and North by its foes, the contest seemed utterly desperate, with no hope of escape for Prussia." Frederick began the contest by a bold stroke, which demonstrated the vigor of his determination and the strength of his understanding. He carried the war into the enemy's country, suddenly entered Sa
Marlborough (search for this): article 1
People determined to be free can never be conquered. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Thinking a brief account of the heroic exertions, indomitable skill; and final triumph of Frederick of Prussia, may be with advantage laid before our people at this time, and help to encourage us all in the unequal contest, I send you the following short summary drawn from "Allison's Life of Marlborough:" "Prussia was now threatened by the most formidable confederacy ever yet in modern times directed against a single State. Austria, Russia, France, Sweden, and Saxony, united in alliance to partition the Prussian territories. These allies had ninety millions of men in their dominions, and with ease could bring four hundred thousand to the field. Prussia had only six millions, who were strained to the utmost to array an army of one hundred and twenty thousand. Even with the aid of England and Hanover, not more than fifty thousand auxiliaries could be relied on. Prussia had neither s
People determined to be free can never be conquered. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Thinking a brief account of the heroic exertions, indomitable skill; and final triumph of Frederick of Prussia, may be with advantage laid before our people at this time, and help to encourage us all in the unequal contest, I send you the following short summary drawn from "Allison's Life of Marlborough:" "Prussia was now threatened by the most formidable confederacy ever yet in modern times directed against a single State. Austria, Russia, France, Sweden, and Saxony, united in alliance to partition the Prussian territories. These allies had ninety millions of men in their dominions, and with ease could bring four hundred thousand to the field. Prussia had only six millions, who were strained to the utmost to array an army of one hundred and twenty thousand. Even with the aid of England and Hanover, not more than fifty thousand auxiliaries could be relied on. Prussia had neither s
ike France. Its territory open on every side, composed of flat plains, unprotected by great rivers, and surrounded on the South, East, and North by its foes, the contest seemed utterly desperate, with no hope of escape for Prussia." Frederick began the contest by a bold stroke, which demonstrated the vigor of his determination and the strength of his understanding. He carried the war into the enemy's country, suddenly entered Saxony, made, himself master of Dresden, shut the forces of Saxony up in the entrenched camp at Pirna. Marshal Brown advanced with 60,000 men to relieve them. Frederick met and totally defeated him at Lowositz. At Pirna, after vain efforts to escape, 14,000 laid down their arms; the whole of Saxony submitted, and Frederick; throughout the whole war, thenceforward turned its entire resources to his own support. The allies made desperate efforts to regain the advantages they had lost. France put 100,000 men on foot, though bound for only 24,000. The Die
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