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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
sensation. Great Britain, on the contrary, has been the great Abolition power of the world. She has been the "Genius of Universal Emancipation." There is no proposition in mathematics which can be more clearly demonstrated than that, for more than a quarter of a century, England has employed the slavery, subject to divide and ruin her commercial and manufacturing rival, the old United States of America. It was through her influence that the flame of Abolition fanaticism was kindled in New England, which at last burned as under the cords of the former Union, and are now enveloping the whole land in their lurid blaze. Having accomplished this result, it was natural to suppose that she would prepare to reap the fruits of her policy, and these fruits, we supposed, consisted in the acquisition of Southern staples and commerce, in her independence of the United States, and the overthrow of that power as a commercial and manufacturing rival. It seems probable, however, that the rewards
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
The course of England and France. Since it became evident at a late period that the Governments of Great Britain and France had no earthly intention of interfering in the American quarrel, the question often suggests itself why the Southern Confederacy was so long permitted to remain in doubt on that subject, and actually to receive encouragement of the idea that her independence would be ultimately recognized by those Governments. We are aware that the Emperor of the French, with that se subject of slavery; there has been no Exeter Hall in Paris, there have been no Dukes and Duchesses to patronize runaway negroes. When Mrs. Stowe visited that city, instead of the ovation she received in England, she produced no sensation. Great Britain, on the contrary, has been the great Abolition power of the world. She has been the "Genius of Universal Emancipation." There is no proposition in mathematics which can be more clearly demonstrated than that, for more than a quarter of a cen
France (France) (search for this): article 1
The course of England and France. Since it became evident at a late period that the Governments of Great Britain and FFrance had no earthly intention of interfering in the American quarrel, the question often suggests itself why the Southern C has repeatedly urged the English Government to unite with France in opening the blockade, but his overtures have been decliern Confederacy had declared its independence, England and France had both accepted the Federal theory of the Constitution aid and comfort which, from the very beginning, England and France had thrown into the Southern scale, and which warranted thopes have been aroused only to be disappointed.--So far as France is concerned, the South has no peculiar cause of complaint have sought privately to enlist English co operation with France in its favor. Nor has France at any time intermeddled witFrance at any time intermeddled with American concerns, nor in any way exerted her influence in attenuating the Northern and Southern States of the old America
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 1
age that by no possible misconstruction it could be tortured to mean anything but what it said. Nay, it would have been better for the South and more humane, if, as soon as it was heard abroad that the Southern Confederacy had declared its independence, England and France had both accepted the Federal theory of the Constitution as correct, and assumed that the Southern movement was a rebellion to which they could give no more countenance, aid, and comfort, in any way, than to a rebellion in Canada, Algiers, or many of the other recognized provinces or possessions of any European power. If they had taken this ground, the South would have expected nothing at their hands, and relying upon herself from the start, would have redoubled her energies.--But, instead of this, they began by assuming the Federal theory to be wrong, and the State Rights theory to be true, as they are, their journals produced powerful arguments to establish this proposition; their Governments acknowledged the Sout
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
r coast fortifications, showed its conviction of the same apparently inevitable result. The United States correspondents abroad of Federal newspapers bore continued and emphatic testimony to the same effect, and the United States ministers found their residences at the various courts of Europe so uncomfortable on account of the general hostility to their country, that they were all anxious to rthe slavery, subject to divide and ruin her commercial and manufacturing rival, the old United States of America. It was through her influence that the flame of Abolition fanaticism was kindled in Ned, consisted in the acquisition of Southern staples and commerce, in her independence of the United States, and the overthrow of that power as a commercial and manufacturing rival. It seems probablele the war which she has fomented will so divide and cripple her ancient adversary that the United States, even if again consolidated, could never become a formidable rival either in industry or arm
vement, however he may have sought privately to enlist English co operation with France in its favor. Nor has France at any time intermeddled with American concerns, nor in any way exerted her influence in attenuating the Northern and Southern States of the old American Union from each other. French emissaries have never come to this continent for the purpose of setting the North and the South by the ears on the subject of slavery; there has been no Exeter Hall in Paris, there have been no Dukes and Duchesses to patronize runaway negroes. When Mrs. Stowe visited that city, instead of the ovation she received in England, she produced no sensation. Great Britain, on the contrary, has been the great Abolition power of the world. She has been the "Genius of Universal Emancipation." There is no proposition in mathematics which can be more clearly demonstrated than that, for more than a quarter of a century, England has employed the slavery, subject to divide and ruin her commercial an
American Union from each other. French emissaries have never come to this continent for the purpose of setting the North and the South by the ears on the subject of slavery; there has been no Exeter Hall in Paris, there have been no Dukes and Duchesses to patronize runaway negroes. When Mrs. Stowe visited that city, instead of the ovation she received in England, she produced no sensation. Great Britain, on the contrary, has been the great Abolition power of the world. She has been the "Genius of Universal Emancipation." There is no proposition in mathematics which can be more clearly demonstrated than that, for more than a quarter of a century, England has employed the slavery, subject to divide and ruin her commercial and manufacturing rival, the old United States of America. It was through her influence that the flame of Abolition fanaticism was kindled in New England, which at last burned as under the cords of the former Union, and are now enveloping the whole land in their l
lish co operation with France in its favor. Nor has France at any time intermeddled with American concerns, nor in any way exerted her influence in attenuating the Northern and Southern States of the old American Union from each other. French emissaries have never come to this continent for the purpose of setting the North and the South by the ears on the subject of slavery; there has been no Exeter Hall in Paris, there have been no Dukes and Duchesses to patronize runaway negroes. When Mrs. Stowe visited that city, instead of the ovation she received in England, she produced no sensation. Great Britain, on the contrary, has been the great Abolition power of the world. She has been the "Genius of Universal Emancipation." There is no proposition in mathematics which can be more clearly demonstrated than that, for more than a quarter of a century, England has employed the slavery, subject to divide and ruin her commercial and manufacturing rival, the old United States of America. I