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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
ion was never thrust before the world by a despot who occupies the Presidential chair at Washington. It will, however, have no other effect upon the South than to inspire the people with greater energy and determination to be free from the power which would crush them into subjection: Fellow-Citizens of the Senates and House of Representatives:--I recommend the adoption of a joint resolution by your honorable bodies which shall be substantially as follows: "Resolved, That the United States ought to co-operate with any State which may adopt gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such State pecuniary aid to be used by such State in its discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences, public and private, produced by such change of system." If the proposition contained in the resolution does not meet the approval of Congress and the country, there is the end; but if it does command such approval, I seem it of importance that the States and people immediately interest
Crittenden (search for this): article 5
on now made is an offer only. I hope it may be esteemed no offence to ask whether the pecuniary consideration tendered would not be of more value to the States and private persons concerned than are the institution and property in it, in the present aspect of affairs. While it is true that the adoption of the proposed resolution would be merely initiatory, and not within itself a practical measure, it is recommended in the hope that it would soon lead to important practical results.--In full view of great responsibility to my God and to my country. I earnestly beg the attention of Congress and the people to the subject. [Signed]Abraham Lincoln. As a sequel to the message of Lincoln, Mr. Conkling, of New York, moved, for the adaption of the House of Representatives, the resolution sketched in the message. After considerable debate, in which Mr. Crittenden as usual, employed and talked about the effect at this time, &c, the resolution was adopted — yeas 88, pays $1.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 5
Message from Lincoln. The following message, asking the passage of a resolution in favor of the policy of making contributions from the Federal treasury to aid the States so disposed, to emancipate their slaves, was recently sent to Congress by Abraham Lincoln. A more hypocritical composition was never thrust before the world by a despot who occupies the Presidential chair at Washington. It will, however, have no other effect upon the South than to inspire the people with greater e to my God and to my country. I earnestly beg the attention of Congress and the people to the subject. [Signed]Abraham Lincoln. As a sequel to the message of Lincoln, Mr. Conkling, of New York, moved, for the adaption of the House ofLincoln, Mr. Conkling, of New York, moved, for the adaption of the House of Representatives, the resolution sketched in the message. After considerable debate, in which Mr. Crittenden as usual, employed and talked about the effect at this time, &c, the resolution was adopted — yeas 88, pays $1.
on now made is an offer only. I hope it may be esteemed no offence to ask whether the pecuniary consideration tendered would not be of more value to the States and private persons concerned than are the institution and property in it, in the present aspect of affairs. While it is true that the adoption of the proposed resolution would be merely initiatory, and not within itself a practical measure, it is recommended in the hope that it would soon lead to important practical results.--In full view of great responsibility to my God and to my country. I earnestly beg the attention of Congress and the people to the subject. [Signed]Abraham Lincoln. As a sequel to the message of Lincoln, Mr. Conkling, of New York, moved, for the adaption of the House of Representatives, the resolution sketched in the message. After considerable debate, in which Mr. Crittenden as usual, employed and talked about the effect at this time, &c, the resolution was adopted — yeas 88, pays $1.
ow very soon the current expenditures of this war would purchase, at fair valuation, all the slaves in any named State. Such a proposition on the part of the General Government sets up no claim of a right, by Federal authority, to interfere with slavery within State limits, referring, as it does, the absolute control of the subject in each case to the State and its people immediately interested. It is proposed as a matter of perfectly free choice with them. In he annual message, last December, I thought fit to say: The Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed. I said this not hastily, but deliberately. War has been made, and continues to be an indispensable means to this end. A practical reacknowledgment of the national authority would render the war unnecessary, and it would at once cease. If, however, resistance continues, the war must also continue, and it is impossible to foresee all the incidents which may attend and all the ruin wh