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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 887 total hits in 472 results.

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eports. The New Orleans Picayune produce Capt. John H. Morganne official reports of his successful scouting expeditions, which we append. They are worthy of preservation as a part of the history of our revolution: Murfreesboro', Tenn., March 10, 1862. Sir: With a view of determining the enemy's position and his movements, Lieut. Col. R. C. Wood, of Adam's Mississippi Cavalry, myself, ten Texas Rangers, of Terry's late command, and fifteen of my squadron, left here on the 7th inst., at two P. M., and proceeded in the direction of Nashville. Marching eighteen miles, and avoiding the pike, we encamped for the night. Early on the morning of the 8th, having procured suitable guides, we resumed our march and entered the Federal lines. At half a mile from a cavalry camp, which we were compelled to pass in full view, we captured five men belonging to the 18th Ohio, Col. Smith. Their arms — Enfield rifles — were also secured. Passing the cavalry camp, we continued our m
s, of Terry's late command, and fifteen of my squadron, left here on the 7th inst., at two P. M., and proceeded in the direction of Nashville. Marching eighteen miles, and avoiding the pike, we encamped for the night. Early on the morning of the 8th, having procured suitable guides, we resumed our march and entered the Federal lines. At half a mile from a cavalry camp, which we were compelled to pass in full view, we captured five men belonging to the 18th Ohio, Col. Smith. Their arms — Enf-morrow. I have omitted to mention that before leaving Gallatin the engine was destroyed, thus leaving but one on the road. I have ascertained, beyond doubt, that Love, a man of my command, who was taken prisoner in the affair of the 8th instant, (since dead,) was shot by the enemy after being taken. The whole country through which we passed turned out in masses to welcome us. I have never before witnessed such enthusiasm and feeling. Men, women, and children, never, wearied in
$25 reward --Ranaway from my store on Tuesday morning, 15th instant, my negro Boy, Lewis. Washington. He is to bright mulatto, thickset, about 5 feet high, 15 years old; had on when last seen a brown sack coat, brown pants, and a military cap. The above reward will be paid for his delivery to me. S. S. Cotterell. No. 119 Main streets, ap 2--ts
eir advance, a regiment of cavalry; is eight miles this side of Nashville, on the Murfreesboro' pike. A sergeant among the prisoners, who seems to be an intelligent man, can give you some interesting details. John R. Morgan, Captain, Commanding Post. To Maj. Gen. Hardes, Com. 1st Division. Shelbyville, Tenn., March 10. Major Gen. W. J. Hardes, Commanding 1st Division. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of a portion of my command on the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th inst. At about 4 o'clock P. M., on the 18th inst., with Col. Wood and a detachment of 40 men, I left Murfreesboro' for Gallatin, having learned that no Federal forces remained at that place. The chief objects of the expedition were to intercept the mail, to destroy the rolling stock on the road, to make prisoners, and to obtain information of interest to the service. Our destination was kept secret, and the command having been sent from Murfreesboro' in separate pa
s, Com. 1st Division. Shelbyville, Tenn., March 10. Major Gen. W. J. Hardes, Commanding 1st Division. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of a portion of my command on the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th inst. At about 4 o'clock P. M., on the 18th inst., with Col. Wood and a detachment of 40 men, I left Murfreesboro' for Gallatin, having learned that no Federal forces remained at that place. The chief objects of the expedition were to intercept the 18th inst., with Col. Wood and a detachment of 40 men, I left Murfreesboro' for Gallatin, having learned that no Federal forces remained at that place. The chief objects of the expedition were to intercept the mail, to destroy the rolling stock on the road, to make prisoners, and to obtain information of interest to the service. Our destination was kept secret, and the command having been sent from Murfreesboro' in separate parties, by different roads, to unite at some distance from town, it was impossible that the enemy could be apprised of the movement until after the blow was struck. A citizen of Murfreesboro', whose seal and loyalty is undoubted, made the necessary arrangements of runners to
apt. Mickel, and Capt. Edmonson are all safe, and distinguished themselves by acts of personal bravery, as, in fact, did all in their respective commands. The battle was fierce and bloody, although of short duration. I have not yet heard one complaint against a single officer or man on the field that day. W. Col. Vance, of North Carolina. To the Editors of the Dispatch: A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, a part of whose letter is published in your issue of the 19th inst., in speaking of the recent battle at Newbern, says: "Co., Vance, a brother of G. B. Vance, former member of Congress, and now also a Colonel in the C. S. A., cut his way through the ranks of the enemy with but light loss. The cry was victory or death." "The writer of the letter from which the extract is taken is mistaken as to the Col. Vance of whom he speaks. The gentleman who commanded the 26th regiment North Carolina volunteers in the battle of Newbern was Zebulon B. Vance, the former
Richard H. Rains, the oldest printer in New York, died on the 22d ult.
The battle of Kernstown.an interesting Narrative. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Mr. Jackson, Va., March 28, 1862. On Saturday, the 22d inst., Gen. Jackson rapidly moved his little army from camp, near this place, back to Cedar Creek, twenty-six miles, in one day, and camped there that night, making his headquarters in Birdsburg, which was evacuated by the enemy the day before. Early the next morning (Sunday) he again moved forward, and the artillery opened on the enemy near Kernstown about 12 o'clock. The fight was made by the Yankees as they fought at Manassas, first making a demonstration on our right and then throwing their whole force rapidly to our left. An "artillery duel" was kept up until about four o'clock, our forces moving gradually to the left, when the enemy's infantry advanced in force. They were met by the 37th and 21st Virginia regiments, and repulsed three times. Three times the Stars and Stripes fell, and three times did our gallant troops
Ten late W. H. Pritonard. --The remains of Mr. Wm. H. Pritchard arrived at Augusta, Ga., from Richmond, on the 29th ult., and were interred the same day. A larges res of citizens followed them to the ry.
More Yankees Bagged on Edisto Island. --At midnight on Friday, a body of our troops landed on Edisto Island, with a view of making a little "raid." At 8 o'clock A. M. on Saturday, they attacked the enemy's picken guard, consisting of 50 men. Our boys succeeded in killing one, wounding one and making twenty-one of the Yankees prisoners. This neat little exploit was accomplished almost without loss on our side, three of our men having been slightly wounded. The captives were brought to the city yesterday.--Charleston Mercury 31st ult.
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