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has been already conditionally pledged. There are many rich men in all our cities, parishes, and counties throughout the Confederacy, who could give thousands of dollars, "and not miss it," towards constructing iron- clad vessels like the Manassas and Virginia. Will they do it, or will they wait for the enemy to capture the towns on our water courses by means of Ms gunboats, and thereby subject themselves to oil the evils which must follow? The property of rebels shall be conflicted, say Lincoln, Seward & Co, to pay the cost of the war, in what condition, then, will be the property of our rich men? They will be in a disagreeable dilemma; either they will have to take the oath of allegiance to the Lincoln Government or lose their property. Their movable property they will never be able to recover, at least there will be very small chance for it, and their land not until the enemy shall have been expelled. Will it not cost less to prevent the enemy from obtaining possession of the
ntention to rob everybody he meets who restate him — to desolate the land, and finally to appropriate it to his own use. We cannot hereafter reproach him with hypocrisy, be plumply advertises us that he is a wholesale robber and intends to plunder us! He does not scruple to avow it in advance. If this do not rouse our rich men, nothing can. If this do not loose their purse strings, nothing will. If their eyes cannot see the standard of which the enemy defiantly flaunts in their faces, then those eyes are covered by an impenetrable him. But we think the enemy has cast aside all disguises, all pretences of good will, and of respecting the rights of the Southern people, too soon for the success of his purposes. His legal advertisement to the South of his intention to perpetrate wholesale robbery will run through her like an electric shock, and nerve the whole Southern people to dispute his progress inch by inch, with all the weapons God and nature have given them.--N. O. Bull
already conditionally pledged. There are many rich men in all our cities, parishes, and counties throughout the Confederacy, who could give thousands of dollars, "and not miss it," towards constructing iron- clad vessels like the Manassas and Virginia. Will they do it, or will they wait for the enemy to capture the towns on our water courses by means of Ms gunboats, and thereby subject themselves to oil the evils which must follow? The property of rebels shall be conflicted, say Lincoln, Seward & Co, to pay the cost of the war, in what condition, then, will be the property of our rich men? They will be in a disagreeable dilemma; either they will have to take the oath of allegiance to the Lincoln Government or lose their property. Their movable property they will never be able to recover, at least there will be very small chance for it, and their land not until the enemy shall have been expelled. Will it not cost less to prevent the enemy from obtaining possession of these lands
Blanton Duncan (search for this): article 4
Worthy of Imitation Col. Blanton Duncan, of Kentucky, now in Virginia, offers to subscribe two thousand dollars towards building an iron clad gunboat at Richmond for the defence of that city. He truthfully says; "There are hundreds of rich men in our community who can give from five hundred to five thousand dollars each and not miss it." It is proposed that the boat shall cost seven hundred thousand dollars. The sum of two hundred thousand has been already conditionally pledged. There are many rich men in all our cities, parishes, and counties throughout the Confederacy, who could give thousands of dollars, "and not miss it," towards constructing iron- clad vessels like the Manassas and Virginia. Will they do it, or will they wait for the enemy to capture the towns on our water courses by means of Ms gunboats, and thereby subject themselves to oil the evils which must follow? The property of rebels shall be conflicted, say Lincoln, Seward & Co, to pay the cost of