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here were no doubt very great. Grant, according to a Northern letter writer, had about 60,000. If Buell had as many more, the aggregate must have reached about 120,000. These however, may be in excess. Yet Floyd reported that the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, lo
nt of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, look with interest to immediate military movements in the vicinity where it was won. Our gallant Generals may be forced to a little manœuvring there. They have the noble advantage, however, of an army of heroes who have been tried, who have not only fought like heroes, but who have whipped their enem
The flag of truce steamer from Fortress Monroe, on the 7th instant, brought to Norfolk Col. R. F. Baldwin, of Winchester; Maj. W. N. Brown, 20th Mississippi regiment, and Maj. R. McAlexander, of Ala.
forts, until on the 11th of April, he had a conference with the gallant Anderson, who told him that he would be out of provisions on the 15th, and would then, unless relief was sent, be compelled to surrender. Pryor, of Virginia (that then loyal State,) was in Charleston the time, and maintained that a blow must be struck, or Virginia would be lost. An unarmed vessel, laden with provisions, was sent to the relief of Fort Sumter, but was fired upon by the rebels, and turned back. On the 12th, Beauregard followed the advice of Pryor, in order to help Virginia side of the Union. I need not tell you of the many long and weary hours of suffering endured within the walls of Fort Sumter by the brave and patriotic Anderson, and his band of faithful soldiers — you have all, doubtless, read of them. Here, for the first time the nation's history, was the national flag of the United States disgraced. Soon after the fall of Sumter, Secretary Walker publicly boasted that on the 1st o
allowed the traitors to go on consummated their unholy schemes.) What did South Carolina next do? Attacked Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, drove the gallant Anderson into Fort Sumter, and thus, under the direction of Beauregard, who is some time styled No regard, commenced erecting the long line of batteries and forts. Beauregard continued erecting his forts, until on the 11th of April, he had a conference with the gallant Anderson, who told him that he would be out of provisions on the 15th, and would then, unless relief was sent, be compelled to surrender. Pryor, of Virginia (that then loyal State,) was in Charleston the time, and maintained that a blow must be struck, or Virginia would be lost. An unarmed vessel, laden with provisions, was sent to the relief of Fort Sumter, but was fired upon by the rebels, and turned back. On the 12th, Beauregard followed the advice of Pryor, in order to help Virginia side of the Union. I need not tell you of the many long and weary h
$25 reward. --Ranaway from my store, on Tuesday morning, 15th instant, my negro Boy, Lewis Washington. He is a bright mulatto, thick set, about 5 feet high, 15 years old; had on when last seen a brown sack coat, brown pants, and a military cap. The above reward will be paid for his delivery to me. S. S. Cottrell, ap 2--ts No. 129 Main street.
Thursday, has the following: Through Fortress Monroe and other sources we gather to-day a variety of interesting intelligence from Southern a papers. The Norfolk papers are perfectly aware of the movements at Old Point, notwithstanding the papers on this side say nothing in relation to them. Even the visit of Vice-President Hamlin with a party of ladies to the Fortress on Sunday is stated in the Richmond papers of Tuesday. Memphis papers of the 27th and a Charleston Mercury of the 22d ult. have been received at Cairo. By advices from the vicinity of Savannah we learn that the surrender of Fort Pulas it was daily expected. The rebel force there had been cut off from all communication with Savannah for thirty days. A proposition had been made to allow the garrison to withdraw, but General Sherman demanded an unconditional surrender. An offer had been made by the friends of the Rebel officers to give $30,000 to any one who would rescue them. General Sherman was about to
A half-brother of Gen. Zellicoffer, one of the Confederate prisoners confined at Terre Haute, Indiana, died on the 23d ult. The total number of deaths to that date was seven--names not given. Rev. S. H. Adams, of Yorkville, S. C., a faithful minister and devoted patriot, died recently.
rchant a fair profit for his time and labor and expenses, and protects the public from speculation on their necessities. Proposed Tax on cotton. It is stated that Governor Brown will recommend to the next Legislature of Georgia to levya tax of $26 per bale on all cotton raised in that State the present year, and if the cotton does not pay the tax, that other property of the planter be sold for that purpose. Burning of the steamer Sabine. From the Houston Telegraph, of the 29th ult., we learn that the steamboat Sablue, from a Texas port to a Louisiana port, engaged in the coasting trade, encountered a Federal blockading steamer off Calcanean, and was run ashore and set fire to by her owner and entirely consumed. She had a valuable cargo. The Eastern Farming Squadron. The number of Gloucester (Mass.) fishing vessels lost off George's Bank, in the gale of February 24, was fifteen, and the number lost January I was four. By the loss of these 19 vessels 138 men
Depends of the West Bank of the Mississippi. --The Mobile Register, of the 30th ult., has the following important intelligence: As Curtis has displayed no further stomach for the fray since the battle of Elkhorn, the indefatigable Van-Dorn has pushed forward to the Mississippi with all rapidity. His army is in good condition, much reinforced, and is concentrating at Jacksonport and Pocahontas. General Jeff. Thompson is operating closely in connection with Van-Dorn's army, and it is thought that some Federals in the neighborhood of New Madrid may be hurt before long. Thus both sides are concentrating all their power for the great and desperate struggle for the mastership of the Mississippi river and valley. This movement of Van-Dorn was executed with great celerity and secrecy. He was doubtless enabled to accomplish it by the facilities of water transportation. Jacksonport is on White river and Pocahontas about 50 miles north of it on the Big Black fork of white r
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