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't go. Let the enemy begin the attack — and they began it at Baif's Bluff. Then was exhibited a fearful amount of incompetency, of slaughter, of treachery.--but the Major- General Commanding, after Banks had crossed the Potomac, ordered his return, and refused to accept the battle tendered by the foe. A long, geting Indian summer, with roads more hard and skies more beautiful than Virginia had seen for many a year, followed, carrying October, with its dry soil and hammy sun, onward, till December melted into January. This seemingly special invitation of Providence for an onward movement, instead of being accepted, was whiled away in ostentations parades and gala-day sham fights, where the common soldiery mounted their white gloves, and the Major General Commanding bestrode his favorite charger, the unthinking crowd gaping with wonder, while belies from the Northern cities showered their an esteem smiles all over the scene. As the new year approached, "Why don't be moved" said
begin the attack — and they began it at Baif's Bluff. Then was exhibited a fearful amount of incompetency, of slaughter, of treachery.--but the Major- General Commanding, after Banks had crossed the Potomac, ordered his return, and refused to accept the battle tendered by the foe. A long, geting Indian summer, with roads more hard and skies more beautiful than Virginia had seen for many a year, followed, carrying October, with its dry soil and hammy sun, onward, till December melted into January. This seemingly special invitation of Providence for an onward movement, instead of being accepted, was whiled away in ostentations parades and gala-day sham fights, where the common soldiery mounted their white gloves, and the Major General Commanding bestrode his favorite charger, the unthinking crowd gaping with wonder, while belies from the Northern cities showered their an esteem smiles all over the scene. As the new year approached, "Why don't be moved" said some impatient obser
rneys. But the army remained in full feather, and didn't go. Let the enemy begin the attack — and they began it at Baif's Bluff. Then was exhibited a fearful amount of incompetency, of slaughter, of treachery.--but the Major- General Commanding, after Banks had crossed the Potomac, ordered his return, and refused to accept the battle tendered by the foe. A long, geting Indian summer, with roads more hard and skies more beautiful than Virginia had seen for many a year, followed, carrying October, with its dry soil and hammy sun, onward, till December melted into January. This seemingly special invitation of Providence for an onward movement, instead of being accepted, was whiled away in ostentations parades and gala-day sham fights, where the common soldiery mounted their white gloves, and the Major General Commanding bestrode his favorite charger, the unthinking crowd gaping with wonder, while belies from the Northern cities showered their an esteem smiles all over the scene.
my or move himself; either to take his columns away from the Potomac, or to yield up their lead to other hands. Will he move? I think he will, and at an early day. Where? If I know, I would not tell. Will he find the foe? I am not sure that he will soon find him in large numbers. If he meats him, will he conquer him?--There is not doubt of it with such troops, so well armed, and with such ponderous masses of artillery, and led by such experienced officers as Heintzelman, McDowell, Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Smith, McCall, Cassy, Doubleday, and their associates, who have seen service, and such recruits from civil life as Backs, Wadsworth, Martindale, Cochrane, and others who are eager to distinguish themselves, the grand army of the Potomac, whether its nominal board be McClellan, McDowell, or Hallack, or Fremont, or the President of the United States, (Its Constitutional Commander-In-Chief,) or with concert of action, even if it have no nominal head, will know no such word as
e himself; either to take his columns away from the Potomac, or to yield up their lead to other hands. Will he move? I think he will, and at an early day. Where? If I know, I would not tell. Will he find the foe? I am not sure that he will soon find him in large numbers. If he meats him, will he conquer him?--There is not doubt of it with such troops, so well armed, and with such ponderous masses of artillery, and led by such experienced officers as Heintzelman, McDowell, Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Smith, McCall, Cassy, Doubleday, and their associates, who have seen service, and such recruits from civil life as Backs, Wadsworth, Martindale, Cochrane, and others who are eager to distinguish themselves, the grand army of the Potomac, whether its nominal board be McClellan, McDowell, or Hallack, or Fremont, or the President of the United States, (Its Constitutional Commander-In-Chief,) or with concert of action, even if it have no nominal head, will know no such word as fail ! It
Heintzelman (search for this): article 1
either to move his army or move himself; either to take his columns away from the Potomac, or to yield up their lead to other hands. Will he move? I think he will, and at an early day. Where? If I know, I would not tell. Will he find the foe? I am not sure that he will soon find him in large numbers. If he meats him, will he conquer him?--There is not doubt of it with such troops, so well armed, and with such ponderous masses of artillery, and led by such experienced officers as Heintzelman, McDowell, Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Smith, McCall, Cassy, Doubleday, and their associates, who have seen service, and such recruits from civil life as Backs, Wadsworth, Martindale, Cochrane, and others who are eager to distinguish themselves, the grand army of the Potomac, whether its nominal board be McClellan, McDowell, or Hallack, or Fremont, or the President of the United States, (Its Constitutional Commander-In-Chief,) or with concert of action, even if it have no nominal head, will
ulaski and threaten Savannah, and Gen. Buller hurries off his regiments and transports to the Gulf for an attack, via Ship Island, upon New Orleans! Does this mounting in hot hastes, this gleaming of bayonets and bursting of shells all around from Pickens to Springfield, disturb the equanimity or jostle the self-control of the Major-General Commanding? Not a bit of it. Like Message, of whom Napoleon said, "His head is never so cool as when a thousand cannon are thundering in his ears," our Field-Marshal possesses his soul in peace, and directs the telegraphic censer to reiterate the chronic fact, "All is quiet along the lines of the Potomac." And so the army has stood through the winter, but without being permitted to go into winter quarters. The "Major-General Commanding" has enjoyed his luxurious apartments at "these headquarters." and has retired nightly to his downy pillow; while the leaders of divisions and brigades have dwelt under breezy canvas, and the common soldiers
nd the Major General Commanding bestrode his favorite charger, the unthinking crowd gaping with wonder, while belies from the Northern cities showered their an esteem smiles all over the scene. As the new year approached, "Why don't be moved" said some impatient observer, infatuated with the delusion that war means fighting. "He is waiting for something to turn up!" responded grave believers in strategy. Well, it did turn up at Hill Spring. --Why don't be move now ? He is waiting for Burnside. His plan contemplates a general once upon the foe all along the lines from Hatteras to Kansas. When they are ready at the extremities, the centre will fall with crushing weight upon Manassas, and the rebellion will be ended. Be patient. By and-by the gallant Burnside, after encountering and mangling obstacles immeasurably worse than all the mud that can be piled between the Potomac and the Rappahannock, opens fire at Roanoke in the East, while Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Donelson
nly one in which anything had been done; and, forgetting how cheap pen and ink are, they took it for granted that the author of such glowing dispatched must, in fighting qualities, be the ante-type of Frederick, of Bincher, of Wellington, and of Napoleon. So, "click" went the telegraph, and, quick estan express railway train can run, George B. McClellan appeared in Washington, and assumed the command of the army of the Potomac. Having set up an idol, all patriotic men, of high and low degrDoes this mounting in hot hastes, this gleaming of bayonets and bursting of shells all around from Pickens to Springfield, disturb the equanimity or jostle the self-control of the Major-General Commanding? Not a bit of it. Like Message, of whom Napoleon said, "His head is never so cool as when a thousand cannon are thundering in his ears," our Field-Marshal possesses his soul in peace, and directs the telegraphic censer to reiterate the chronic fact, "All is quiet along the lines of the Potomac
nd the hot weather parsed away. But the army stood still. Let the autumnal rains fall, and the mud dried away. It was the we mean — when they fall, then! So the over the P their foliage, till they looked us bare as a flock of packed tourneys. But the army remained in full feather, and didn't go. Let the enemy begin the attack — and they began it at Baif's Bluff. Then was exhibited a fearful amount of incompetency, of slaughter, of treachery.--but the Major- General Commanding, after Banks had crossed the Potomac, ordered his return, and refused to accept the battle tendered by the foe. A long, geting Indian summer, with roads more hard and skies more beautiful than Virginia had seen for many a year, followed, carrying October, with its dry soil and hammy sun, onward, till December melted into January. This seemingly special invitation of Providence for an onward movement, instead of being accepted, was whiled away in ostentations parades and gala-day sham fights, where the
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