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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
ll. He tell and died soon afterwards, but not until the enemy had again given way all along the lines. He died in the arms of Col. Wm. Preston, of Kentucky, his aid and brother-in-law, and former U. S. Minister to Spain, while Gov. Harris, of Tennessee, another aid, supported his head. Thus a brave soldier and skillful officer has gone down before the red tide of battle. He fell in the very arms of victory, with our flag upraised and advancing under the mighty impetus given to our attacas struck no less than three times, while in the act of leading a charge upon the enemy's camp, twice in the body and once in the leg. The latter severed the femoral artery, and soon after he fell from his horse into the arms of Gov. Harris, of Tennessee, who was acting as his aid, and died upon the spot. His only words were: "My wound is mortal." His life oozed away as gently as that of an infant, and without a struggle the great General rested in his last sleep, undisturbed by the sounds of
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 15
Gen. Bragg. Gen. T. distributed his batteries along the roads and upon such open elevations as he could find. The batteries have been handled with consummate skill and effect throughout the day by their respective officers. The nature of the ground is exceedingly unfavorable for field operations. With the exception of two or three small fields of eight or ten acres each, the battle has been fought wholly in the woods. The woods are quite open, however — much more so than they are in Georgia; but they never the less interfere very much with the evolutions of the army. The ground is rolling, and in many places quite wet and boggy near the water courses, several of which cross the field, and still further impeded the operations of the day. But Gen. Hardee has encountered the enemy in front. The sun is just rising as his division is hurled against them like a thunderbolt. The enemy was not expecting an attack, as was evident from the condition in which he received us. Inde
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
st be very heavy, though not so great as it would have been but for the protection afforded by the tress. Among our wounded are Gens. Cheatham, Bushrod Johnson, Bowen, Clark, and Gladden--the first five not seriously. Gen. Gladden, who commanded the right wing of Hardee's corps, lost his left arm; Gen. Cheatham received a ball in the shoulder, and Gen. Bushrod Johnson one in the side. General Bowen was wounded in the neck, and doing well at last accounts. Colonel Adams, of the 1st. Louisiana regulars, succeeded General Gladden in the command of the right wing, and was soon after shot, the ball striking him just above the eye and coming out behind the ear. Colonel Kitt Williams, of Memphis, and Col. Blythe, of Mississippi, formerly Consul to Havana, were killed. Many other officers were wounded and killed, cut my knowledge of the regiments is too limited, and the confusion too great to procure reliable details. The Mississippians, Tennesseeans, and Louisianian suffered terrib
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
The battle of Shiloh.graphic account of the First day's fight. The Western mall falled last evening beyond Knoxville, but fortunately the Southern mail came through, and we are enabled to present to our readers a full and graphic account of the first day's fight at Shiloh, written by the army correspondent of the Savannah Republican: We commenced the attack at sunrise this morning. Our order of battle is said to be the strongest known to military science. We advanced in three parallel lines or corps, each one in line of battle. The first or front corps was led by Major-General Hardee. Immediately behind him came a full complement of artillery. A thousand yards in his rear followed the second corp or line, led by Major-General Bragg. Immediately in his rear came more artillery, and behind them came the third corps, being our reserve, commanded by Major-General Polk. Gen. Johnston was in supreme command, nobly assisted by Gen. Beauregard. The artillery was commanded
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 15
tiss.--That can hardly be, sir. If your army had pushed on after the battle of Manassas, it might have taken Washington, and overrun the North, and brought us to peace. We had an insufficient supply of arms then, and were not prepared. The muskets purchased in Belgium by Fremont were of but little account; you could turn your thumb in the muzzle, the bore was so large. We also procured from England the old arms that have been stored away as useless in London Tower ever since the war with Napoleon in 1816. They are of no value whatever. It is only within the last sixty days that we have become thoroughly and efficiently armed. Our supply is now ample, and we cannot be overcome. Your Government has made two mistakes--first, in not availing itself of the fruits of the battle of Manassas; and secondly, in waiting until we had become well armed and organized. We have now 250,000 men in camps of instruction, who will be brought upon the field as they may be needed. We do not doubt t
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 15
the river. You have met and overcome today the best troops we have. Beauregard.--I am glad to hear it, and trust that the result of this day's work may bring your Government to a frame of mind more favorable to peace. Prentiss.--That can hardly be, sir. If your army had pushed on after the battle of Manassas, it might have taken Washington, and overrun the North, and brought us to peace. We had an insufficient supply of arms then, and were not prepared. The muskets purchased in Belgium by Fremont were of but little account; you could turn your thumb in the muzzle, the bore was so large. We also procured from England the old arms that have been stored away as useless in London Tower ever since the war with Napoleon in 1816. They are of no value whatever. It is only within the last sixty days that we have become thoroughly and efficiently armed. Our supply is now ample, and we cannot be overcome. Your Government has made two mistakes--first, in not availing itself of t
Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 15
were wounded and killed, cut my knowledge of the regiments is too limited, and the confusion too great to procure reliable details. The Mississippians, Tennesseeans, and Louisianian suffered terribly. All the troops behaved most gallantly. Never did men fight better; and yet many of them were raw troops fresh from their homes. The 21st Alabama regiment took two batteries, and the 1st Louisiana a section of artillery. Other regiments did equally well. The battle was fought around Shiloh Church, the place of worship of the surrounding country, and will be known in history as the Battle of Shiloh. I write in Captain Fulton's tent, Quartermaster of the 53d Ohio regiment, which Gen. Beauregard has kindly assigned to two friends and myself. Captain F. was good enough to leave an ample supply of paper, which I have been using freely. The tent was perforated by twenty-one musket balls. It is now raining very hard. Up to sunset the day was lovely. The change is the resul
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 15
wing of Hardee's corps, lost his left arm; Gen. Cheatham received a ball in the shoulder, and Gen. Bushrod Johnson one in the side. General Bowen was wounded in the neck, and doing well at last accounts. Colonel Adams, of the 1st. Louisiana regulars, succeeded General Gladden in the command of the right wing, and was soon after shot, the ball striking him just above the eye and coming out behind the ear. Colonel Kitt Williams, of Memphis, and Col. Blythe, of Mississippi, formerly Consul to Havana, were killed. Many other officers were wounded and killed, cut my knowledge of the regiments is too limited, and the confusion too great to procure reliable details. The Mississippians, Tennesseeans, and Louisianian suffered terribly. All the troops behaved most gallantly. Never did men fight better; and yet many of them were raw troops fresh from their homes. The 21st Alabama regiment took two batteries, and the 1st Louisiana a section of artillery. Other regiments did equally well.
he Mississippians, Tennesseeans, and Louisianian suffered terribly. All the troops behaved most gallantly. Never did men fight better; and yet many of them were raw troops fresh from their homes. The 21st Alabama regiment took two batteries, and the 1st Louisiana a section of artillery. Other regiments did equally well. The battle was fought around Shiloh Church, the place of worship of the surrounding country, and will be known in history as the Battle of Shiloh. I write in Captain Fulton's tent, Quartermaster of the 53d Ohio regiment, which Gen. Beauregard has kindly assigned to two friends and myself. Captain F. was good enough to leave an ample supply of paper, which I have been using freely. The tent was perforated by twenty-one musket balls. It is now raining very hard. Up to sunset the day was lovely. The change is the result, doubtless, of the heavy cannonading kept up since early morning. The enemy is still throwing shells from his gunboats, and some of
the number killed and wounded on either side. The loss upon the part of both must be very heavy, though not so great as it would have been but for the protection afforded by the tress. Among our wounded are Gens. Cheatham, Bushrod Johnson, Bowen, Clark, and Gladden--the first five not seriously. Gen. Gladden, who commanded the right wing of Hardee's corps, lost his left arm; Gen. Cheatham received a ball in the shoulder, and Gen. Bushrod Johnson one in the side. General Bowen was woundGeneral Bowen was wounded in the neck, and doing well at last accounts. Colonel Adams, of the 1st. Louisiana regulars, succeeded General Gladden in the command of the right wing, and was soon after shot, the ball striking him just above the eye and coming out behind the ear. Colonel Kitt Williams, of Memphis, and Col. Blythe, of Mississippi, formerly Consul to Havana, were killed. Many other officers were wounded and killed, cut my knowledge of the regiments is too limited, and the confusion too great to procure re
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