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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 21 total hits in 9 results.

United States (United States) (search for this): article 19
n. The day after these troops left under Gen. McCook, Gov. Johnson deposed the Mayor and Council of the city, and placed them under heavy bonds to meet him every day at the Capitol, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, for trial. The object of this was to assure him of their presence in the city. Upon deposing the old Mayor and Council, the dictator-traitor appointed a new Mayor and a new Council, naming a day for them to meet him and take the oath of office and of allegiance to the United States. But one out of the whole number (about twenty) took the oath, the rest refusing, whereupon he denounced them all as traitors, and dismissed them, declaring it would take twenty thousand troops to keep Nashville in order. One of the gentlemen, however, took occasion to return the Governor's complimentary remark with compound interest, by denouncing him as a traitor to his State and section. The evening following this, as the Governor was returning from his boarding-house to the Capito
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 19
llantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he should not feel safe there; and threatening that if the troops were taken away, he would leave immediately after for Washington city. Gen. McCook accordingly left five thousand troops there to defend the arch traitor, taking ten thousand with him. This would indicate that Gen. Buell's army numbered one hundred and twenty regiments, and probably not less than one hundred thousand men. The day after these troops left under Gen. McCook, Gov. Johnson deposed the Mayor and Council of the city, and placed them under heavy bonds to meet him every day at the Capitol, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, for trial. The object
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 19
Affairs in Nashville, Tenn. A gentleman who left Nashville on Friday, the 11th inst., furnishes to the editor of the Atlanta Commonwealth the following interesting details of transactions there. From his statements it will be perceived that Nashville is far from being a pleasant place for Federal officials — military or civil: General Buell left Nashville at the head of one hundred and ten regiments — which, however, were not entirely full — in two columns. On the Duck river, at Columbia, about forty miles from Nashville, he encountered Scott's Louisiana cavalry, fifteen hundred strong, who fought him gallantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he s<
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 19
Affairs in Nashville, Tenn. A gentleman who left Nashville on Friday, the 11th inst., furnishes to the editor of the Atlanta Commonwealth the following interesting details of transactions there. From his statements it will be perceived that Nashville is far from being a pleasant place for Federal officials — military or civil: General Buell left Nashville at the head of one hundred and ten regiments — which, however, were not entirely full — in two columns. On the Duck river, at Columbia, about forty miles from Nashville, he encountered Scott's Louisiana cavalry, fifteen hundred strong, who fought him gallantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he s<
ought him gallantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging tha city defenceless; that he should not feel safe there; and threatening that if the troops were taken away, he would leave immediately after for Washington city. Gen. McCook accordingly left five thousand troops there to defend the arch traitor, taking ten thousand with him. This would indicate that Gen. Buell's army numbered one hundred and twenty regiments, and probably not less than one hundred thousand men. The day after these troops left under Gen. McCook, Gov. Johnson deposed the Mayor and Council of the city, and placed them under heavy bonds to meet him every day at the Capitol, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, for trial. The object of this was to
ville on Friday, the 11th inst., furnishes to the editor of the Atlanta Commonwealth the following interesting details of transactions there. From his statements it will be perceived that Nashville is far from being a pleasant place for Federal officials — military or civil: General Buell left Nashville at the head of one hundred and ten regiments — which, however, were not entirely full — in two columns. On the Duck river, at Columbia, about forty miles from Nashville, he encountered Scott's Louisiana cavalry, fifteen hundred strong, who fought him gallantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he should not feel safe there; and threatening that if the tro<
hes to the editor of the Atlanta Commonwealth the following interesting details of transactions there. From his statements it will be perceived that Nashville is far from being a pleasant place for Federal officials — military or civil: General Buell left Nashville at the head of one hundred and ten regiments — which, however, were not entirely full — in two columns. On the Duck river, at Columbia, about forty miles from Nashville, he encountered Scott's Louisiana cavalry, fifteen hundreand threatening that if the troops were taken away, he would leave immediately after for Washington city. Gen. McCook accordingly left five thousand troops there to defend the arch traitor, taking ten thousand with him. This would indicate that Gen. Buell's army numbered one hundred and twenty regiments, and probably not less than one hundred thousand men. The day after these troops left under Gen. McCook, Gov. Johnson deposed the Mayor and Council of the city, and placed them under heavy b<
Andy Johnson (search for this): article 19
the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he should not feel safe there; and threatening that if the troops were taken away, he would leave immediately after for Washington city. Gen. McCook accordingly le the arch traitor, taking ten thousand with him. This would indicate that Gen. Buell's army numbered one hundred and twenty regiments, and probably not less than one hundred thousand men. The day after these troops left under Gen. McCook, Gov. Johnson deposed the Mayor and Council of the city, and placed them under heavy bonds to meet him every day at the Capitol, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, for trial. The object of this was to assure him of their presence in the city. Upon deposin
Affairs in Nashville, Tenn. A gentleman who left Nashville on Friday, the 11th inst., furnishes to the editor of the Atlanta Commonwealth the following interesting details of transactions there. From his statements it will be perceived that Nashville is far from being a pleasant place for Federal officials — military or civil: General Buell left Nashville at the head of one hundred and ten regiments — which, however, were not entirely full — in two columns. On the Duck river, at Columbia, about forty miles from Nashville, he encountered Scott's Louisiana cavalry, fifteen hundred strong, who fought him gallantly, checking his advance across the river. The stout and determined resistance made by the spirited troop caused him to send to Nashville to General McCook, who was left in command there with fifteen thousand troops, to form a junction with him. Against this, however, Governor Andy Johnson protested, alleging that it would leave him and the city defenceless; that he s<