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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 20
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Wednesday night, the 9th, and arrived at Huntsville next morning, no one on board dreaming that the Yankees were in the place. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the neares
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 20
ace. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the nearest point. He had proceeded but a little way until a couple of mounted Federal officers, having got scent of him from finding his name on his trung in the cars, came up and accosted him as Capt. Montgomery. He repudiated the name said his name was Johnson, and that he was going to his home from town. They told him they knew better; that he was Capt Montgomery, of the rebel army, was their prisoner, and must go with them.--Quietly remarking that they must know more about hi
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 20
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Wednesday night, the 9th, and arrived at Huntsville next morning, no one on board dreaming that the Yankees were in the place. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the neare
Andy Johnson (search for this): article 20
oon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the nearest point. He had proceeded but a little way until a couple of mounted Federal officers, having got scent of him from finding his name on his trung in the cars, came up and accosted him as Capt. Montgomery. He repudiated the name said his name was Johnson, and that he was going to his home from town. They told him they knew better; that he was Capt Montgomery, of the rebel army, was their prisoner, and must go with them.--Quietly remarking that they must know more about him and his business than he did himself, he turned and started back with them. They stopped on the road-side to chat with some negroes they found in a field, (Yankees will talk to negroes.) They were both very near the Captain. Catching the proper moment when their at
ted back with them. They stopped on the road-side to chat with some negroes they found in a field, (Yankees will talk to negroes.) They were both very near the Captain. Catching the proper moment when their attention was directed to the negroes, be drew a pistol from his pocket and instantly put a ball through the heart of one, who fell down dead. Another moment, and he had put a ball through the other, who feeled, and clung to his horse a few moments. Meantime the Captain was speeding his way back towards the river. Looking back as he got nearly out of sight, he saw the "Yank" fall from his horse sprawling on the ground. He reached the river safely, turned the negro driver back with the horse and buggy, and got himself ferried across just as fifty well-armed and mounted men approached the bank, and could find no means to cross after him. They discharged their guns at him without effect. He took to the mountains, made his way to Chattanooga, and reached here last evening.
J. T. Montgomery (search for this): article 20
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis a little way until a couple of mounted Federal officers, having got scent of him from finding his name on his trung in the cars, came up and accosted him as Capt. Montgomery. He repudiated the name said his name was Johnson, and that he was going to his home from town. They told him they knew better; that he was Capt MontgomeryCapt Montgomery, of the rebel army, was their prisoner, and must go with them.--Quietly remarking that they must know more about him and his business than he did himself, he turned and started back with them. They stopped on the road-side to chat with some negroes they found in a field, (Yankees will talk to negroes.) They were both very nea
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Wednesday night, the 9th, and arrived at Huntsville next morning, no one on board dreaming that the Yankees were in the place. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the neares
An Extraordinary Adventure. --The Atlanta Confederacy, of the 17th inst., relates the following: Yesterday evening Captain J. T. Montgomery arrived here from Corinth, whither he had gone when the wires first flashed the news of Sunday's great fight. After staying there till he desired to return, he left on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Wednesday night, the 9th, and arrived at Huntsville next morning, no one on board dreaming that the Yankees were in the place. He was in the hinomost car, and, as the train stopped, he heard some one say, "the Yankees have got us;" and looking out, he saw them thick as been around the engine, and coming down along the line of the train. He quickly stopped out, took a back street, and was soon out of sight. Near the out skirts of the town he entered a house, exchanged his uniform for citizen's clothes, came back into town, hired a horse and buggy and negro driver, at a livery stable, and started for the Tennessee river at the neare