hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Anson Peters 26 0 Browse Search
Andy Johnson 22 0 Browse Search
James McBride 20 0 Browse Search
James B. Ricketts 15 1 Browse Search
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
West Point (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Farragut 9 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 91 total hits in 37 results.

1 2 3 4
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 16
s were selling out their stock at any price, and commissaries were giving away Government stores. At Clarksville, a mutiny or rebellion had taken place in a Kentucky regiment, owing to their dissatisfaction with the emancipating policy of the Federal Government; and an Indiana regiment being-ordered out to suppress it, the former fired upon the latter, killing twenty and wounding a great number.--My informant conversed with the gentleman who saw the bodies of the dead. Affairs at Huntsville remain quiet, though the enemy were extending their line along the railroad at various points. It is variously estimated that they have captured from fifteen to twenty-two engines, which it is supposed they will run up to Nashville, by way of Decatur. The passengers on the captured train attired in civil garb were allowed to go free. Those in uniforms were detained Among these were two express messengers, Messrs. Bell and Symes, who wore the uniforms of their Georgia companies. The mai
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
in the deepest misery, and they lift them into a new world of light and hops." Such is a specimen of the rhetorical finishes, the Bombastes Ferritic mingling of canto and falsehood with which the Northern people are deluded, and driven to the ulterior measures which really constitute the backbone of the Federal Administration. Their words are sweet as honey in the rocks, but their acts are bitter as gall and cruel as a tyrant's. Upon the same "sail" is a part of a letter from Fortress Monroe, in which I find the following "good one" concerning General Wool: "There is a story going the rounds here concerning a certain — General,--who is — pious enough in character, but on certain occasions when his 'dander is up, ' can do full justice to his feelings by 'giving them mouth.' --When the Merrimac came down, the General was all emotion, and so highly excited that now and then he eased his feelings by certain forcible ejaculations. A contraband, who heard him, gives a
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
ght days, demonstrates beyond a doubt that our land batteries, ably and boldly managed, are more than a match for their heaviest plated gunboats. Hall after ball was thrown into the latter at long range, and it is not likely that they will venture closer than they are actually compelled to do, for the purpose of breaching or silencing our guns. We have on Fort Pillow several weapons that have not as yet opened their mouths, and when they do, it will doubtless be tore-enact the story of Fort Donelson, and the confusion of the swarm of hell bees, which made their futile experiment to the end of its reduction. Even should the darkness of night favor a secret and sudden passage of one or two, it would be a foolhardy and unmilitary movement, which would leave an unconquered fortress in the rear.--Transports could never get by, and one or a half a dozen gunboats would be sure to fall a prey to their temerity. We have also late, if not fresh, news from Nashville. Three gentlemen who
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
e Federal sailors sportively started down the river. Upon one of the sticks composing the masts was fastened a note with the following words upon it: "Commodore Montgomery ! Stand from under ! We're Coming !" The paper sails are infinitesimal fragments of a "Philadelphia Press," and after a deal of deciphering I made out the following, the exultant heading in large caps of the news of the recent battle: Victory ! Victory !--Greatest Battle of the War !!--Contest at Pittsburg Landing--Two Days Desperate Fighting !--Able Generalship on Both Sides — The Battle Commenced by Prentiss's Division — The Odds Against us Fearful !--Grant Incites his Troops to Firmness !!--Our Gunboats Shell the Rebel Trains — Terrible Resistance of the Enemy--General Buell arrives with Reinforcements--Gen. Grant Leads a Charge !--The Rebels Routed and in Full Retreat on Corinth — Their Loss about 35,000 !!!-- Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston Killed !!--Beauregard's Arm Shot Off !!!-- Federal Lo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 16
. Affairs at Huntsville remain quiet, though the enemy were extending their line along the railroad at various points. It is variously estimated that they have captured from fifteen to twenty-two engines, which it is supposed they will run up to Nashville, by way of Decatur. The passengers on the captured train attired in civil garb were allowed to go free. Those in uniforms were detained Among these were two express messengers, Messrs. Bell and Symes, who wore the uniforms of their Georgia companies. The mail agent escaped by leaping from the opposite side of the car and mingling with the passengers. The report of Gen. Pope concerning the capture of Island No.10 has been published in Northern papers with the usual brazen blast of trumpets. He clams to have taken over one hundred guns, a large amount of ammunition of a superior quality, three hundred bags of coffee, and an immense amount of commissary stores, from which the Federal army are now drawing their rations. H
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
l Government; and an Indiana regiment being-ordered out to suppress it, the former fired upon the latter, killing twenty and wounding a great number.--My informant conversed with the gentleman who saw the bodies of the dead. Affairs at Huntsville remain quiet, though the enemy were extending their line along the railroad at various points. It is variously estimated that they have captured from fifteen to twenty-two engines, which it is supposed they will run up to Nashville, by way of Decatur. The passengers on the captured train attired in civil garb were allowed to go free. Those in uniforms were detained Among these were two express messengers, Messrs. Bell and Symes, who wore the uniforms of their Georgia companies. The mail agent escaped by leaping from the opposite side of the car and mingling with the passengers. The report of Gen. Pope concerning the capture of Island No.10 has been published in Northern papers with the usual brazen blast of trumpets. He clams t
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 16
The War in the West. Affairs at Fort Pillow--news from Nashville — the mutiny at Clarksville — operations of the enemy in North Alabama--Island no.10, &c., &c. [Special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Memphis, Tenn., Sunday, A. M. April 27, 1862. Our latest news from Fort Pillow is by an arrival last night. The enemy have in the vicinity seven gun and three mortar boats, and did have on Saturday twenty-six transports field with troops, but these were disappearing in the distance up the river, it is supposed for the purpose of throwing a body down the Tennessee and into Nashville, sundry disturbances having taken place there which make their presence necessary. The distance of the gunboats from the fort is from three and a half to four miles, estimating the time between the flash of their guns and the bursting of their shells-say, about fifteen seconds. On Friday night they threw nine bombs after ten o'clock, but on Saturday their was no firing. Not the sligh
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
The War in the West. Affairs at Fort Pillow--news from Nashville — the mutiny at Clarksville — operations of the enemy in North Alabama--Island no.10, &c., &c. [Special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Memphis, Tenn., Sunday, A. M. April 27, 1862. Our latest news from Fort Pillow is by an arrival last night. The enemy have in the vicinity seven gun and three mortar boats,er places. The opinion is gaining ground daily that the enemy will not attempt to run by Fort Pillow, as they did past our batteries on Island No.10, until an attack has proved successful in theare actually compelled to do, for the purpose of breaching or silencing our guns. We have on Fort Pillow several weapons that have not as yet opened their mouths, and when they do, it will doubtless them and captured the army and everything else en masse Among the articles brought from Fort Pillow by the messenger to whom I above alluded, are the sills of a miniature "dug-out," which some
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 16
man. Col. Alex Brown's regiment, Tennessee. Colonel Baker's, Alabama, Tennessee, and Mississippi. Col. Clark's Tennessee. Col. Marsh Walker's Arkansas, 40th Confederate regiment. Col. Smith's Arkansas. Col. Terry's battalion, Arkansas. The total number taken is not far from eighteen hundred. Arkansas. Col. Terry's battalion, Arkansas. The total number taken is not far from eighteen hundred. He describes our guns as being but indifferently spiked; but we may say the same of Yankee work in this respect. Modern appliances for the removal of spikes are so ingenious that a single night or day will suffice to withdraw any number, and this fact is therefore no reasonable indication of carelessness or ignorance. The fArkansas. The total number taken is not far from eighteen hundred. He describes our guns as being but indifferently spiked; but we may say the same of Yankee work in this respect. Modern appliances for the removal of spikes are so ingenious that a single night or day will suffice to withdraw any number, and this fact is therefore no reasonable indication of carelessness or ignorance. The floating battery, which we supposed fully scuttled, proved to be only partially so, and has been recovered by the Yankees with its eight noble guns. The same may be said of two of the transports. The question was put to one of the officers on the island and in the batteries, why he did not destroy the guns by knocking off the
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
He reports his capture of troops to be fragmentary portions of seven regiments, namely: The 1st Alabama, Colonel Stedman. Col. Alex Brown's regiment, Tennessee. Colonel Baker's, Alabama, Tennessee, and Mississippi. Col. Clark's Tennessee. Col. Marsh Walker's Arkansas, 40th Confederate regiment. Col. Tennessee, and Mississippi. Col. Clark's Tennessee. Col. Marsh Walker's Arkansas, 40th Confederate regiment. Col. Smith's Arkansas. Col. Terry's battalion, Arkansas. The total number taken is not far from eighteen hundred. He describes our guns as being but indifferently spiked; but we may say the same of Yankee work in this respect. Modern appliances for the removal of spikes are so ingenious that a single night or day will suTennessee. Col. Marsh Walker's Arkansas, 40th Confederate regiment. Col. Smith's Arkansas. Col. Terry's battalion, Arkansas. The total number taken is not far from eighteen hundred. He describes our guns as being but indifferently spiked; but we may say the same of Yankee work in this respect. Modern appliances for the removal of spikes are so ingenious that a single night or day will suffice to withdraw any number, and this fact is therefore no reasonable indication of carelessness or ignorance. The floating battery, which we supposed fully scuttled, proved to be only partially so, and has been recovered by the Yankees with its eight noble guns. The same may be said of two of the transports. The questi
1 2 3 4