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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 7
in whose possession they lately were, and being now in occupation of the forces of the United States, who have come to restore order, maintain public tranquility, enforce peace and quiet under the laws and constitution of the United States, the Major General commanding the forces of the United States in the Department of the Gulf, hereby makes known and proclaims the object and purposes of the Government of the United States in thus liking possession of the city of New Orleans and the State of Louisiana, and the rules and regulations by which the laws of the United States will be for the present, and during a state of war, enforced and maintained, for the plain guidance of all good citizens of the United States, as well as others who may heretofore have been in rebellion against their authority. Thrice before has the city of New Orleans been rescued from the hands of a foreign government, and still more calamitous domestic insurrection, by the money and arms of the United States.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
the combined naval and land forces of the United States, and having been evacuated by the rebel fos and regulations by which the laws of the United States will be for the present, and during a stats actual possession by the soldiers of the United States, the civil authorities of the city have fobeing understood to be in arms against the United States, but organized to protect the lives and pry authority whatever, save the flag of the United States and the flags of foreign consulates, must essed. American ensign, the emblem of the United States, must be treated with the utmost deferenceell disposed towards the Government of the United States, who shall renew their oath of alleriance,ving aid and comfort to the enemies of the United States, will not be disturbed, either in person oe similitude of bank notes issued by the Confederate States or scrip, or any trade in the same, is s public mind against the Government of the United States, will be permitted; and all articles of wa[21 more...]
nt mildy and after the usages of the past, it must not be supposed that it will not be vigorously and firmly administered as occasion alls. By command of Major General Butler. Geo. O. Strote, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. The subsistence Guestion. In an editorial comment upon Gen. Buder's proclamation, the Picayane rema by the obstacles thrown by the Federal occupation in the way of the importation of food. One part of this question was in the currency. The first idea of Gen. Butler was to prohibit totally the use or circulation of Confederate notes, and when he modified that view, as it stands modified in the proclamation, he still speaks tened with a dearth approaching — and very speedly — to absolute famine — a dearth which no currency could relieve. The subject was brought to the attention of Gen. Butler, and it is understood, at the time we are writing, that arrangements will be made for the facilitating of the transportation, by railroad and river, of market s<
absolute necessity. There is no currency but Confederate notes and private issues, of various and uncertain responsibility, but all resting on their exchangability into Confederate notes. To make the use of these notes a crime, was, as far as such a decree could be enforce against a people threatened by it with starvation, to extingush the capacity of a hundred thousand people to buy their daily food. It would have been little inferior, in its destructive effects, to a bombardment by Capt. Farragut's guns. The misery inflicted would have been as indiscriminating, only more prolonged in its horrors.--To the extent in which it could have been enforced, it would have been an awful courge, and it is fortunate for humanity that the commanding General was made so sensible of the inexpediency, at least, of the measure, as to have revoked the prohibition and to leave the people, for the time the use of the limited and only currency they have, in supplying their daily wants. The other
he facilitating of the transportation, by railroad and river, of market supplies and articles of food, subject to military regulations as to the entry and departure of persons. Advance of "Bronze John." The Yankee invaders are taking possession of buildings in the most populous parts of New Orleans for the purpose of establishing hospitals therein; and the papers of the city very properly protest against the proceeding. The Evans House, on Poyuras street, is thus occupied, and the Picayune says: As to the unsuitableness of the buiding for that purpose, we have nothing to say. That is their concern, not outs. We do say, however, that the location of a military hospital on one of our leading business thoroughfares, and in the heart of the city, is very indudicious and reprehensible. It is fraught with danger, and ought to be at once abandoned. We speak plainly because we are just entering on the summer and our unhealthy season, and it is our duty at all times to protes
George O. Strote (search for this): article 7
with in their duties. And, finally, it may be sufficient to add, without further enumeration, that all the requirements of martial law will be imposed so long as, in the judgment of the United States authorities, it may be necessary. And while it is the desire of these authorities to exercise this Government mildy and after the usages of the past, it must not be supposed that it will not be vigorously and firmly administered as occasion alls. By command of Major General Butler. Geo. O. Strote, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. The subsistence Guestion. In an editorial comment upon Gen. Buder's proclamation, the Picayane remarks: A very important omission in the proclamation, which touches us very nearly at this time, is noticeable in the want of distinct assurances on the subject of the subsistance of the great population in this city, and is imperilled by the obstacles thrown by the Federal occupation in the way of the importation of food. One part of this ques
l the requirements of martial law will be imposed so long as, in the judgment of the United States authorities, it may be necessary. And while it is the desire of these authorities to exercise this Government mildy and after the usages of the past, it must not be supposed that it will not be vigorously and firmly administered as occasion alls. By command of Major General Butler. Geo. O. Strote, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. The subsistence Guestion. In an editorial comment upon Gen. Buder's proclamation, the Picayane remarks: A very important omission in the proclamation, which touches us very nearly at this time, is noticeable in the want of distinct assurances on the subject of the subsistance of the great population in this city, and is imperilled by the obstacles thrown by the Federal occupation in the way of the importation of food. One part of this question was in the currency. The first idea of Gen. Butler was to prohibit totally the use or circulation of
season, and it is our duty at all times to protest against any measure that is calculated to jeopardize the health of the city. More especially is this duty not to be disregarded now that thousands of unacclimated persons have been thrust upon us. All the precautions which wisdom and experience have suggested have not hitherto prevented the almost annual visits of the devastating scourge of our sunny clime, and there is, in our present condition, very great reason to fear that the summer of 1862 will be frightfully memorable for the ravages of the yellow fever in New Orleans. In so former year has there been here so much food for the terrible pastilence, and we shudder when the probability of its outbreak is forced upon our attention by what we see around us. Already the effect of the climate on the strangers within our gates is apparent to every observer, and we know not at what moment the fearful harvest of death may commence. It is not only our duty to protest against any pr
May 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): article 7
From New Orleans.proclamation of the Federal Military commander. The following is the proclamation issued by the General in command of the invading forces at New Orleans, to which allusion was made in Tuesday's Dispatch. Headq'rs Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, may 1, 1862. The city of New Orleans and its envirous, with all its interior and exterior defences, having been surrendered to the combined naval and land forces of the United States, and having been evacuated by the rebel forces in whose possession they lately were, and being now in occupation of the forces of the United States, who have come to restore order, maintain public tranquility, enforce peace and quiet under the laws and constitution of the United States, the Major General commanding the forces of the United States in the Department of the Gulf, hereby makes known and proclaims the object and purposes of the Government of the United States in thus liking possession of the city of New Orleans and the