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Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
ames are not known, were slighly wounded in the hands. There have been no arrivals here from Pittsburg Landing since Sunday. The naval engagement near Fort Pillow--our Cotton-clad Boats Victorious. The Memphis Avalanche, of May 12, gives the following account of the recent naval engagement on the Mississippi: The r some interesting particulars of the grand naval battle which took place there on Saturday. Gen. Jeff. Thompson, who is in command of the gunboat fleet at Fort Pillow, on hearing that it was the intention of the enemy to come down to attack that place on Saturday, concluded that he would go up and anticipate their movements. — the enemy's shot penetrating into the cotton only a few inches, and none passing through. Therefore there is now no danger of the enemy reaching Memphis via Fort Pillow. From Gen. Halleck's army. Cairo, May 14. --Gen. Mitchell's division has formed a junction with Gen. Pope, and now forms the extreme left of our l
Plumb Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
ur boats. Gen. Thompson was on board the Bragg, which made the first attack. All did their duty nobly, though special mention is made of Capt. Fulkerson, of the Van-Dorn. The St. Louis was seriously damaged, and was run on a bar opposite Plumb Point. --Yesterday, at noon, she was still on the bar, with a transport alongside, supposed to be in a sinking condition. The fight was brought to a close by the Federal gunboats withdrawing into shoal water, where ours could not go. They then og and the steward on the Van-Dorn. The former had his leg shot off at the thigh, and the latter had his head shot off.--We also had four slightly injured. The Federal loss is known to be at least twenty five. The engagement took place at Plumb Point, and lasted an hour and a half, when our boats returned to the fort. The impregnability of our cotton-clad fleet is considered now to be fully demonstrated — the enemy's shot penetrating into the cotton only a few inches, and none passing
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
chmond, and has doubtless returned to the Federal Capital are this. The Petersburg Express has received the following statement from gentlemen who left Norfolk last Saturday afternoon: They represent the city as filled with Lincoln soldiers, but arrangements had been made which will reduce the number to 3,000, the balance advancing as far as Suffolk, where they will remain until a junction with Burnside can be effected. Among the soldiers at Norfolk is a regiment composed entirely of Dutch, from the Colonel down to the drummer boys. The orders are all given in the Dutch language, and one sees and hears nothing but Dutch while in their presence. The people of Norfolk keep aloof from the Federals, having no intercourse with them whatever. The stores are all closed, and it is a rare sight to see a male citizen on the streets — the ladies never. All the flags among the ships, and on the Custom-House and Atlantic Hotel, were flying at half- mast Saturday. Some distingu
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
fifteen miles South of Richmond, a short distauce above City Point on the James river. If the Navy Department had done its duty, it would have had gunboats up at City Point long ago, which could throw shells into that portion of the enemy. Iheir office. The capture and killing of Yankees at City Point. We find in the Petersburg Express of yesterday the annexed details of the exploit at City Point, which differs in some respcts from the brief account sent by telegraph and pubapers: Quite a brilliant little affair occurred at City Point yesterday afternoon, by which nine Yankee officers and mvessels lying in the James river approached the wharf at City Point, from which nine men were seen to land and proceed up tounderstand the immediate cause of the Surgeon's visit to City Point was in obedience to the request of a lady there, that he not at all expecting an attack from the Confederates at City Point. But for orders to the contrary, we understand, a large
Benton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 16
, though special mention is made of Capt. Fulkerson, of the Van-Dorn. The St. Louis was seriously damaged, and was run on a bar opposite Plumb Point. --Yesterday, at noon, she was still on the bar, with a transport alongside, supposed to be in a sinking condition. The fight was brought to a close by the Federal gunboats withdrawing into shoal water, where ours could not go. They then opened broadside after broadside at us, throwing some three hundred shot, but with no damage. The Benton gunboat, Com. Foote's flagship, did not leave the shore, but all the time poured a most destructive fire upon our boats. The Federals made an attempt to board the Sumter, but the boarding party were all dispersed by a shower of balls and hot water.--Several of the Federals were killed at their guns, and others at the forecastle. We fired from our big gun not exceeding twenty shots, mostly from the Jeff. Thompson. Our loss in the engagement is two--the cook on the Bragg and the stew
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
ve miles north of this, so that our whole army is now together. It is understood that the enemy has made a stand on the opposite side of a swamp, (Chickahominy,) about fifteen miles South of Richmond, a short distauce above City Point on the James river. If the Navy Department had done its duty, it would have had gunboats up at City Point long ago, which could throw shells into that portion of the enemy. Its failure to do so, will make the work of the army harder, but the work will be cers: Quite a brilliant little affair occurred at City Point yesterday afternoon, by which nine Yankee officers and men were taken prisoners, and seven or eight killed. About 8 o'clock a small boat from one of the war vessels lying in the James river approached the wharf at City Point, from which nine men were seen to land and proceed up to the town, while seven or eight remained behind in the boat. Stationed near at hand and completely hidden from view was a detachment of fifteen men, be
United States (United States) (search for this): article 16
ent wrecking derrick has gone down to raise her, and it is supposed she would be afloat again by to-day. The U. S. gunboat Mound City did excellent service during the engagement. She was struck in a similar manner to the Cincinnati, but was not so badly damaged. She was run into shoal water, when she settled to the bottom. She was afterwards pumped out, and arrived here to-day in tow for repairs. During the heat of the engagement, one of the rebel gunboats got hold of one of the United States bomb-ketchers and was towing it away, when the Benton bore down upon her, and after a brief skirmish, compelled the rebel to leave the prize. The following are the casualties on the Cincinnati: Capt. Stemble was shot through the neck, but the wound is not expectted to prove serious. Fourth master Reynolds was shot through the abdomen, and has since died. Two seamen, whose names are not known, were slighly wounded in the hands. There have been no arrivals here fro
Barhamsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
rebel regiment, while quartered here, were daily far greater than that of our whole army. The prisoners taken are representatives of over forty rebel regiments of infantry, besides independent volunteer corps, batteries, cavalry, &c. The 6th and 13th North Carolina, and 24th Virginia, are largely represented. The wounded remaining in the hospitals are doing well generally. Private Thorne, of the 11th Alabama regiment, died in the hospital last night of his wounds. From Barhamsville. Headquarters, Barhamsville, New Kent county, May 11. The first duty of the Army of the Potomac, since the evacuation of Yorktown, has been to overtake and fight the enemy. The army of Gen. McClellan has been pressing hard after the rebels ever since last Sunday. During all that time our cavalry has been almost entirely in sight of their rear guard, and prisoners have been constantly falling into our hands. We are now within five miler of West Point, which lies to the North
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
Abe Lincoln has lately been in Norfolk, but from all we can hear he met with a chilling reception. He concluded not to extend his visit to Richmond, and has doubtless returned to the Federal Capital are this. The Petersburg Express has received the following statement from gentlemen who left Norfolk last Saturday afternoon: They represent the city as filled with Lincoln soldiers, but arrangements had been made which will reduce the number to 3,000, the balance advancing as far as Suffolk, where they will remain until a junction with Burnside can be effected. Among the soldiers at Norfolk is a regiment composed entirely of Dutch, from the Colonel down to the drummer boys. The orders are all given in the Dutch language, and one sees and hears nothing but Dutch while in their presence. The people of Norfolk keep aloof from the Federals, having no intercourse with them whatever. The stores are all closed, and it is a rare sight to see a male citizen on the streets — the
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 16
rom Gen. Halleck's army. Cairo, May 14. --Gen. Mitchell's division has formed a junction with Gen. Pope, and now forms the extreme left of our line. On Tuesday, Gen. Pope moved forward his column to retake possession of Farmington, which was lost in the skirmish on Friday. The result of the expedition has not transspired up to the time the steamer left Pittsburg. As the steamer Gladiator, with the Fourth Minnesota Regiment aboard, was passing Paris Landing, on the Tennessee river, on route for Pittsburg, her upper works gave way, killing six of the troops outright, and injuring several others. The destruction of the Merrimac. The Yankee description of the destruction of our iron-clad steamer Virginia (Merrimac) presents a strange inconsistency in one respect. We make an extract from the Newport News correspondence of the New York Herald: Some officers who witnessed the burning and explosion of the Merrimac yesterday morning from the point on which
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