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Hardy County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
nder Commander John Rodgers, and learned the history of the fight of the day before at Fort Darling, and also of the bursting of the Haugatuck's large gun, and the evacuation by the rebels of all their James river fortifications and batteries below Fort Darling, which was supposed to have taken place on the previous Wednesday night. It seems that the Monitor and Galena were the only vessels of the squadron able to run past all the lower fortifications of the rebels on Dog's Point and at Hardy's Bluffs, which is fifteen miles above Newport News, and all the way up to Fort Darling, eight miles below Richmond, where they found the channel effectively blockaded, as stated in a previous dispatch. On arriving in range of the guns of Fort Darling, which is situated upon an elevation of two hundred feet above the water surface, the further progress of the two iron clads up the river was therefore prevented, and that of the remainder of the fleet stopped at points below. The heavy g
White House Point (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 23
ats of the Pamunney. The Philadelphia Inquirer's correspondent writing from "Waterico, New Kent county," Friday, May 16, says: To-day the pickets of the 3d Illinois cavalry advanced to this point, which is six miles by water from White House Point. Here is the residence of a wealthy planter named Braxton Garlick. His residence is built upon a high bluff, in a romantic and beautiful spot. He is as bitter a rebel as is to be found in the country. It was he who had the schooners sunhe Chickahominy. A reconnaissance was at once ordered, and they were found to have all gone, their cavalry pickets retreating whenever we came in sight. They no doubt feared being out off. Some nights since we moved up the whole army near White House Point. We can now open the railroad to within fifteen miles of Richmond. On to Richmond. The welcome face of Old Sol has again made its appearance, and the roads are drying so rapidly that by to morrow they will again be quite dusty. A
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 23
e, Gov. Wise's place. No prisoners were taken, and but little information was obtained. The place was found almost deserted. A flag of truce was sent out yesterday in the direction of Suffolk, to return a prisoner of State released from Fort Warren. The Seaboard and Roanoke railroad has been found in good condition to Suffolk, only a single bridge having been destroyed. The road will be repaired immediately, and the rolling stock put on as soon as possible. A large quantity ofictory by General Milroy. The Post Office was re-opened here to-day by Colonel Trott; of the Department. No Post-master has yet been selected. The flag of truce which left Norfolk on Saturday morning with the released prisoners from Fort Warren, returned yesterday afternoon. The rebel steamer Planter. In the Federal Senate on Monday, May 19, Mr. Grimes introduced a bill for the relief of Robert Small and others, colored, who recently delivered the rebel steamer Planter to Co
United States (United States) (search for this): article 23
re satisfactory under the authority of the United States then it was under rebel rule for some monte Secretary of the Navy invest the same in United States stocks, the interest to be paid to Small ace been, and now is, a citizen of the United States of America, and in the said State resident, inhacormorant under the Government of the United States of America, and that, since the last continuance on, between the Government of the Confederate States of America and the said Government of the UniUnited States of America, and that the said plaintiff is not and has never been engaged in the military service of the Confederate States of America, but was, on the said — day of--, in the year 1861, a, and is now, an alien enemy of the said Confederate States, aiding and abetting the United States iUnited States in the existing war against the Confederate States, and this he is ready to verify; wherefore he praConfederate States, and this he is ready to verify; wherefore he prays judgment if the said plaintiff ought further to have and maintain his said action against him."
Jamestown (Virginia) (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
ur hundred rebels evacuated it. He then proceeded up the river, finding all the rebel batteries, which were numerous, between Hardy's Point, Fort Huger, and Jamestown, deserted, with their guns mostly dismounted and rendered temporarily useless. Com. Goldsborough took the proper precautions to secure the ordnance thus left by the rebels. The affair at Fort Darling. Near Jamestown he met the division of his squadron that had previously gone up the river, under Commander John Rodgers, and learned the history of the fight of the day before at Fort Darling, and also of the bursting of the Haugatuck's large gun, and the evacuation by the rebels of squadron up the river. When last heard from on Friday, Commodore Goldsborough was continuing his progress, with the most of his squadron, up the river above Jamestown, securing the ordinaries, etc., abandoned by the rebels as he progressed. The general evacuation of their works be low Fort Darling has doubtless enabled Com
St. Peter's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 23
ation. He was arrested while passing the lines, by an officer of the Second Rhode Island, and escorted to close confinement by his own regiment. He has been turned over to General McClellan by General Stoneman, who caused his arrest. St. Peter's church occupied. The 6th cavalry occupied St. Peter's church to-day, the rebels falling back, Gen. Stuart and Col. Lee having been there but a few hours before. The church has been closed, and further desecration of it will be prevented by ouSt. Peter's church to-day, the rebels falling back, Gen. Stuart and Col. Lee having been there but a few hours before. The church has been closed, and further desecration of it will be prevented by our troops. Here it was that Gen. Washing promised to "love, honor, and protect" the beautiful widow. Another retreat. Contraband coming in last night say the rebels are again moving back over the Chickahominy. A reconnaissance was at once ordered, and they were found to have all gone, their cavalry pickets retreating whenever we came in sight. They no doubt feared being out off. Some nights since we moved up the whole army near White House Point. We can now open the railroad to withi
France (France) (search for this): article 23
g, for the first time since the occupation of the city by the Union forces. When the embargo upon trade is removed, business will revive. Already the good effects of the change of armies is seen in the increasing confidence of the inhabitants. The most absurd and exaggerated rumors are constantly circulating. Among the latest are reports of the defeat of the Union forces near Richmond, and wounding of General McClellan; the recognition of the Confederate Government by England and France, and visit of the French and English Ministers to Richmond; the blowing up of the Pensacola Navy-Yard, and a great victory by General Milroy. The Post Office was re-opened here to-day by Colonel Trott; of the Department. No Post-master has yet been selected. The flag of truce which left Norfolk on Saturday morning with the released prisoners from Fort Warren, returned yesterday afternoon. The rebel steamer Planter. In the Federal Senate on Monday, May 19, Mr. Grimes intro
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
the bridge. The telegraph "on to Richmond." The U. S. military telegraph has an office open and in operation in a saw-mill at the 14th mile post from Richmond. The lines to the various camps and stations between the headquarters and Fortress Monroe are in good condition, and working admirably under the personal superintendence of Mr. Thos. F. Eckert. Nation of the Secretaries. Secretaries Welles and Seward, and Attorney-General Blair, returned to-day from their visit to FortreFortress Monroe and the Peninsula. They appear to be well satisfied with their visit, and express the utmost confidence in the progress of Gen. McClellan's campaign. The war in Kansas. Leavenworth, May 19. --Gen. Blunt has issued marching orders to the New Mexican expedition. It consists of the Kansas 1st, 2d and 7th, and the Wisconsin 12th and 15th regiments, commanded by Gen. R. B. Mitchell, and is in every respect a splendid brigade.--It is said that Col. Barstow, of the Wisconsin 3
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
n in the least, and the cry is still, "On to Richmond!" Rebels advancing upon Fredericksburg. Washington, May 19. --Two contraband have just arrived at Gen. Bayard's headquarters below Fredericksburg, and report that the rebels are about fifteen miles below Fredericksburg, with a considerable force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery. The information seems reliable. The bridge across the Rappahannock will be completed to night; the Locomotive arrived over the road from Aquia Creek to Falmouth last evening, bringing one hundred and fifty workmen, who are to-day employed in finishing the bridge. The telegraph "on to Richmond." The U. S. military telegraph has an office open and in operation in a saw-mill at the 14th mile post from Richmond. The lines to the various camps and stations between the headquarters and Fortress Monroe are in good condition, and working admirably under the personal superintendence of Mr. Thos. F. Eckert. Nation of the Secretari
Centreville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 23
tive in persecuting Union man and having property confiscated. In his desk we found the following form all ready to have been signed. Perhaps our sudden appearance from behind his blockade prevented its execution: "Braxton Garlick vs. Clyde.--And now in this — day of — in the year 1862, comes the said defendant, Braxton Garlick, by R. T. Danfel, his counsel, and says the said plaintiff,--Clyde, ought not further to have and maintain his said action against him, because he says that Clyde, ought not further to have and maintain his said action against him, because he says that since the — day of--, in the year--, from which day until this present term of this Court, this suit has been continued, to wit, on the — day of--, in the year 1861, the said plaintiff was and has ever since been, and now is, a citizen of the United States of America, and in the said State resident, inhabiting and cormorant under the Government of the United States of America, and that, since the last continuance of this suit, to wit, on the said day of--, in the year 1861, a public war existe
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