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Paraje (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): article 15
ar's worth or property be wrapped up in one grand funeral pyte. The fight at Glorietta, New Mexico. The Jackson Mississippian, of the 17th inst. has the following: We learn from a passenger just through from Taxas. that an engagement between 1,700 of Gen. Sibly's brigade, and 2,300 Federals, occurred on the 10th ult., at Glorictta canton, New Mexico. Col. Scurry commanding, had his man posted in the canton through which the Federals were compelled to pass to communicate with Fort Craig. About six hundred of the enemy were killed and wounded, and less than 100 of Scurry's men — among whom however, were Majors Kaguct and Shropabire killed and Lieutenant. Col. Sutton mortally wounded. Gen, Sibley's A. D. C., Capt. Ochlitree, who was bearer of dispatches from Gen. Sibley, reported to our informant that the result of the battle at Glorietta would be the surrender of Fort-Craig to our forces, and the occupation of all New Mexico and Arizona by the Confederates.
Powhatan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
f the latter was a of the order to retreat. The fallure of the Yankees to pursue our retreating forces with activity was caused, as Captain Otey thinks, it, the fact that they had sent a part of their forces by a circultous route to the bridge, with the design of destroying it, and thus cutting off our retreat — a plan to which, however, they signally failed. Major Edgar, of Monror a good man and gallant officer, was killed on the field. Captain Finney, A. A. General, of Powhatan county, was wounded in the side nor dangerously. Capt Thompson, of the 45th Regiment, was mortally wounded. None of the Otey Battery, save Captain C., were injured. Captain Otey being ordered from the field to have his wound dressed, can give no correct extimate of the killed and wounded on either side, though he saw numbers of the enemy dead. Passangers by the Western train last night brought but in additional to the above — in the particular of our loss, reporte very con
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
Otey wounded. The enemy's less is supposed heavy. From the above, it would not appear that the defeat was so disastrous as at first reported, but merely a slight reverse. We understand that Gen. Heth is severely consured for the movement which brought on the engagement but whether there are just ground or not for the censure, we are ware. The gunboats at city point. The Petersburg Express, of Tuesday, says: We understand that two of the enemy's gunboats Often to City Point yesterday, and off down the river.--There are now nine left, and a schooner or two. Yesterday the enemy became a little deflant and landed about one hundred men at the Point. Having been informed that our pickets were not near, we understand that they marched boldly up and down the beach and seemed to feel free from danger. They remained ashore about one hour and then returned. We are informed that our pickets have received orders not to fire on these invaders if they merely come
Glorietta (California, United States) (search for this): article 15
khearted Butler licensed his brutal bords to perpetrate upon the virtuous women of New Orleans must be avonged. Let the of Vicksburg be made classic Let her example which will live in history and make her fame honorable for all time.--Let her people never consent to be ruled by the base of our unprincipled despot. Rather let the flames consume the of her beautiful buildings, and every life and every dollar's worth or property be wrapped up in one grand funeral pyte. The fight at Glorietta, New Mexico. The Jackson Mississippian, of the 17th inst. has the following: We learn from a passenger just through from Taxas. that an engagement between 1,700 of Gen. Sibly's brigade, and 2,300 Federals, occurred on the 10th ult., at Glorictta canton, New Mexico. Col. Scurry commanding, had his man posted in the canton through which the Federals were compelled to pass to communicate with Fort Craig. About six hundred of the enemy were killed and wounded, and less than 100
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
ge no more in such demonstrations of rebellious sentiment, under penalty of condign punishment. How many oboyed and how many were punished, our informant does not set forth. But she does state that Mrs. J. B. Walton, the lovely and accomplished lady of Col. J. B. Walton, of the Washington Artillery, is now in close confinement, because she refused to remove the little flag which formed part of the trimming of her boune. It is thus that the valorous Picayune avenges so much of the rout at Bull Run as was due to the well served guns of the Washington Artillery. Persons were being arrested and consigned to dungeons at the whim of the Yankee despot. Our intelligence from the above-mentioned source is to the effect that fifty thousand men had been landed in the city, and were now quartered within and about it, and garrisoning the works of the coast, lakes and rivers. A great deal of sickness, and of a very fatal type, was prevalling among the unacelimated Yankees of New England, a
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 15
mmission, to be appointed for the purpose, upon whose report that their conduct has been preseminently brave, they will receive this reward of patriotism and courage from the hands of their General G. T. Beauregard, Gen'l. Com'ding. North Alabama. Alluding to the report that Gen. Jero Clemens, and other prominent citisens of Huntaville, had deserted the cause of the South and gone over to the enemy, a correspondent or the montgomery Advertiser writes. The intelligent people of North Alabama are as true and loyal to the cause as in any district in South Carolian. Thus much I say for the people in general. But I have something more to say of certain prominat citizens who have been personally singled out as food for slander, on account, perhape, of their political antecedents. I allude to Gen. Clemens and Col. Nich. Davis. The report that either of these gentlemen have sworn allegiance to the Federal power. Their feeling, sympathies, hearts, are all with the Sout
New England (United States) (search for this): article 15
at Bull Run as was due to the well served guns of the Washington Artillery. Persons were being arrested and consigned to dungeons at the whim of the Yankee despot. Our intelligence from the above-mentioned source is to the effect that fifty thousand men had been landed in the city, and were now quartered within and about it, and garrisoning the works of the coast, lakes and rivers. A great deal of sickness, and of a very fatal type, was prevalling among the unacelimated Yankees of New England, and seventy dead invaders were carried out from one hospital and buried during a single night. Large numbers of buildings are being converted into hospitals for the accommodation of the great number of sick rascale, who, if they do not die from actual disease, probably do from fear, their imaginations being tormented with terrible visions of Yellow Jack. If all signede not fall, they have every reason to he frightened than ever they were by a Bayonet charge of the Confederates. O
to communicate with Fort Craig. About six hundred of the enemy were killed and wounded, and less than 100 of Scurry's men — among whom however, were Majors Kaguct and Shropabire killed and Lieutenant. Col. Sutton mortally wounded. Gen, Sibley's A. D. C., Capt. Ochlitree, who was bearer of dispatches from Gen. Sibley, reported to our informant that the result of the battle at Glorietta would be the surrender of Fort-Craig to our forces, and the occupation of all New Mexico and Arizona Gen. Sibley, reported to our informant that the result of the battle at Glorietta would be the surrender of Fort-Craig to our forces, and the occupation of all New Mexico and Arizona by the Confederates. [Some further mention of this battle will be found under the telegraphic head. Badgas of honor for Beauregard's troops — an Inspiring order. The following is the order recently issued by Gen. Beauregard, to which allusion has been made heretofore: Headquarters Western Department,Corinte, Miss.,may 18th, 1862. To do full justice to the private soldier, who is seldom accorded his meed of praise, and who rarely receives full credit for his gallant deeds
of the Yankees to pursue our retreating forces with activity was caused, as Captain Otey thinks, it, the fact that they had sent a part of their forces by a circultous route to the bridge, with the design of destroying it, and thus cutting off our retreat — a plan to which, however, they signally failed. Major Edgar, of Monror a good man and gallant officer, was killed on the field. Captain Finney, A. A. General, of Powhatan county, was wounded in the side nor dangerously. Capt Thompson, of the 45th Regiment, was mortally wounded. None of the Otey Battery, save Captain C., were injured. Captain Otey being ordered from the field to have his wound dressed, can give no correct extimate of the killed and wounded on either side, though he saw numbers of the enemy dead. Passangers by the Western train last night brought but in additional to the above — in the particular of our loss, reporte very considerably, some stating it only two killed and about twenty wo
in history and make her fame honorable for all time.--Let her people never consent to be ruled by the base of our unprincipled despot. Rather let the flames consume the of her beautiful buildings, and every life and every dollar's worth or property be wrapped up in one grand funeral pyte. The fight at Glorietta, New Mexico. The Jackson Mississippian, of the 17th inst. has the following: We learn from a passenger just through from Taxas. that an engagement between 1,700 of Gen. Sibly's brigade, and 2,300 Federals, occurred on the 10th ult., at Glorictta canton, New Mexico. Col. Scurry commanding, had his man posted in the canton through which the Federals were compelled to pass to communicate with Fort Craig. About six hundred of the enemy were killed and wounded, and less than 100 of Scurry's men — among whom however, were Majors Kaguct and Shropabire killed and Lieutenant. Col. Sutton mortally wounded. Gen, Sibley's A. D. C., Capt. Ochlitree, who was beare
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