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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
The freedom of the press in New Orleans. The following is the language of the True Delta which called form the Edict of Picayune Butler, threatening the publishers of that journal with punishment: "We have received further intelligence with regard to the cotton burning up the river, from which we learn that all stored on the banks of the river below Vicksburg has been destroyed, and that even in the interior, twenty miles from the river, planters were applying the torch to their crops until checked by order of the Governor. The actual destruction, however, is immense. The sacrifice thus made by the planters of Louisiana and Mississippi to the public welfare will be remembered as among the most exalted acts of patriotism in the present war."
Picayune Butler (search for this): article 3
The freedom of the press in New Orleans. The following is the language of the True Delta which called form the Edict of Picayune Butler, threatening the publishers of that journal with punishment: "We have received further intelligence with regard to the cotton burning up the river, from which we learn that all stored on the banks of the river below Vicksburg has been destroyed, and that even in the interior, twenty miles from the river, planters were applying the torch to their crops until checked by order of the Governor. The actual destruction, however, is immense. The sacrifice thus made by the planters of Louisiana and Mississippi to the public welfare will be remembered as among the most exalted acts of patriotism in the present war."